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1 - 9 of 9 results for: ITALIAN

ITALIAN 128: The Italian Renaissance and the Path to Modernity

The literature, art, and history of the Renaissance and beyond. Readings from the 15th through 18th centuries include Moderata Fonte, Machiavelli, Ariosto, Tasso, Galileo, and Goldoni. Taught in Italian. Prerequisites: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent (2 years of Italian)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Springer, C. (PI)

ITALIAN 154: Film & Philosophy (COMPLIT 154A, ENGLISH 154F, FRENCH 154, PHIL 193C, PHIL 293C)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ITALIAN 154E: Film & Philosophy CE (COMPLIT 154E, FRENCH 154E, PHIL 193E, PHIL 293E)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English. Satisfies the WAY CE.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ITALIAN 175: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, HISTORY 206E, ILAC 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to major capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Dante, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Gogol, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ITALIAN 286: Poetry and Philosophy (FRENCH 286, FRENCH 386, ITALIAN 386)

When and why do philosophers resort to poetry?nWhat is the relationship between poetic metaphor and philosophical argumentation?nWhy is the poetic often associated with empathy - recently touted as an essential human characteristic - whereas philosophy is considered more objective?nWhat is poetry's role in the pursuit of wisdom or the good life?nAuthors include Nietzsche, Heidegger, Bataille, Agamben, Ricoeur, Derrida, Irigaray, Wyschogrod, and Cavarero.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wittman, L. (PI)

ITALIAN 300: Italian Modernities: Lecture Series and Course

Over the course of the whole year, we will invite 6 speakers to present work on modern Italian culture and literature; these sessions will be supplemented by seminar meetings in which we discuss the work of our guests and prepare writing projects that relate to them.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wittman, L. (PI)

ITALIAN 321: Giambattista Vico (FRENCH 321)

An intensive reading of Vico¿s New Science. Emphasis will be on Vico¿s philosophy of history and theories of poetic wisdom, myth, and language. Vico will be put in dialogue with René Descartes, Rousseau, Auguste Compte, Claude Lévi Strauss, and Paul Feyerabend, whose ideas about myth and science converge in striking ways with Vico¿s.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Harrison, R. (PI)

ITALIAN 386: Poetry and Philosophy (FRENCH 286, FRENCH 386, ITALIAN 286)

When and why do philosophers resort to poetry?nWhat is the relationship between poetic metaphor and philosophical argumentation?nWhy is the poetic often associated with empathy - recently touted as an essential human characteristic - whereas philosophy is considered more objective?nWhat is poetry's role in the pursuit of wisdom or the good life?nAuthors include Nietzsche, Heidegger, Bataille, Agamben, Ricoeur, Derrida, Irigaray, Wyschogrod, and Cavarero.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wittman, L. (PI)

ITALIAN 395: Philosophical Reading Group (COMPLIT 359A, FRENCH 395)

Discussion of one contemporary or historical text from the Western philosophical tradition per quarter in a group of faculty and graduate students. For admission of new participants, a conversation with H. U. Gumbrecht is required. May be repeated for credit. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Harrison, R. (PI)
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