2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 16 results for: AFRICAAM

AFRICAAM 18A: Jazz History: Ragtime to Bebop, 1900-1940 (MUSIC 18A)

From the beginning of jazz to the war years.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Low, M. (PI)

AFRICAAM 31: RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora

Students to engage in an intellectual discussion about the African Diaspora with leading faculty at Stanford across departments including Education, Linguistics, Sociology, History, Political Science, English, and Theater & Performance Studies. Several lunches with guest speakers. This course will meet in the Program for African & African American Studies Office in Building 360 Room 362B (Main Quad). This course is limited to Freshman and Sophomore enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

AFRICAAM 43: Introduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature (AMSTUD 12A, ENGLISH 12A)

(Formerly English 43/143). In his bold study, What Was African American Literature?, Kenneth Warren defines African American literature as a late nineteenth- to mid-twentieth-century response to the nation's Jim Crow segregated order. But in the aftermath of the Jim Crow era and the Civil Rights movement, can critics still speak, coherently, of "African American literature"? And how does this political conception of African American literary production compare with accounts grounded in black language and culture? Taking up Warren's intervention, this course will explore African American literature from its earliest manifestations in the spirituals and slave narratives to texts composed at the height of desegregation and decolonization struggles at mid-century and beyond.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Elam, M. (PI)

AFRICAAM 48Q: South Africa: Contested Transitions (HISTORY 48Q)

Preference to sophomores. The inauguration of Nelson Mandela as president in May 1994 marked the end of an era and a way of life for South Africa. The changes have been dramatic, yet the legacies of racism and inequality persist. Focus: overlapping and sharply contested transitions. Who advocates and opposes change? Why? What are their historical and social roots and strategies? How do people reconstruct their society? Historical and current sources, including films, novels, and the Internet.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Samoff, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 50B: Nineteenth Century America (CSRE 50S, HISTORY 50B)

(Same as HISTORY 150B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: White, R. (PI)

AFRICAAM 105: Introduction to African and African American Studies

Interdisciplinary. Central themes in African American culture and history related to race as a definitive American phenomenon. African survivals and interpretations of slavery in the New World, contrasting interpretations of the Black family, African American literature, and art. Possible readings: Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Richard Wright, Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Malcolm X, Alice Walker, and Bell Hooks. Focus may vary each year.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AFRICAAM 111: AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa (AFRICAST 112, AFRICAST 212)

Foreign aid can help Africa, say the advocates. Certainly not, say the critics. Is foreign aid a solution? or a problem? Should there be more aid, less aid, or none at all? Africa has developed imaginative and innovative approaches in many sectors. At the same time, many African countries have become increasingly dependent on foreign aid. How do foreign aid and local initiatives intersect? We will examine several contentious issues in contemporary Africa, exploring roots, contested analyses, and proposed solutions, examining foreign aid and the aid relationship. As African communities and countries work to shape their future, what are the foreign roles, and what are their consequences?
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Samoff, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 132: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health (HUMBIO 122S)

Examines health disparities in the U.S., looking at the patterns of those disparities and their root causes. Explores the intersection of lower social class and ethnic minority status in affecting health status and access to health care. Compares social and biological conceptualizations of race and ethnicity. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Barr, D. (PI)

AFRICAAM 133: Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean (AFRICAST 132, FRENCH 133, JEWISHST 143)

This course aims to equip students with an understanding of the cultural, political and literary aspects at play in the literatures of Francophone Africa and the Caribbean. Our primary readings will be Francophone novels and poetry, though we will also read some theoretical texts. The assigned readings will expose students to literature from diverse French-speaking regions of the African/Caribbean world. This course will also serve as a "literary toolbox," with the intention of facilitating an understanding of literary forms, terms and practices. Students can expect to work on their production of written and spoken French (in addition to reading comprehension) both in and outside of class. Special guest: LEILA SLIMANI (Goncourt Prize 2016). Required readings include: Leila Slimani, "Sexe et Mensonges au Maroc", Albert Memmi, "La Statue de Sel," Kaouther Adimi, "L'Envers des autres", Maryse Condé, "La Vie sans fards". Movies include "Goodbye Morocco", "Aya de Yopougon", "Les Baies d'Alger". nTaught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ulloa, M. (PI)

AFRICAAM 141X: Activism and Intersectionality (CSRE 141X, FEMGEN 141, SOC 153)

How are contemporary U.S. social movements shaped by the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality? This course explores the emergence, dynamics, tactics, and targets of social movements. Readings include empirical and theoretical social movement texts, including deep dives into Black, White, and Chicana feminisms; the KKK; and queer/LGBT movements. We will explore how social movement emergence and persistence is related to participants¿ identities and experiences with inequality; how the dynamics, targets, and tactics of mobilized participants are shaped by race, class, gender, and/or sexuality; and how social movement scholars have addressed the intersectional nature of inequality, identity, and community.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Crossley, A. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints