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381 - 390 of 668 results for: all courses

GERMAN 144: Pop Feminism: Unrest and Unease in the Contemporary Feminist Moment (CSRE 144G, FEMGEN 144G)

This course examines feminist reaction/expression/ to and in German and American pop culture. We will examine a feminist approach using a variety of different media, including film, music videos, and literature. We will consider the intersections of race and gender constructions, as well as the cultural aspects of each iteration of "pop." The course will be taught in English, but German-speaking students are encouraged to read in the original. nNote: This course contains sexually explicit content.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 241: African Americans in Germany

In this class, we will wrestle with the question: How have African Americans understood their experiences with race outside of the United States? African Americans have been migrating and circulating the globe for centuries, and it is only recently that scholars have considered the ways in which an abroad experience has been transformative for African Americans. In this seminar style class, we will explore why and how African Americans have used their experiences in Germany to express a new understanding of their Black identity in the United States. We will also explore processes of oversexualization, stereotyping, and translation (of Black culture in Germany) in addition to interrogating the politics of identity in our examination of Blackness in Europe.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Watkins, J. (PI)

GLOBAL 137: Islam in America (AFRICAAM 135A, AMSTUD 135X, CSRE 135, RELIGST 135)

This course explores the history of Islam in North America with special emphasis on the experience of Muslims in the United States. Contrary to popularly held belief, Muslims have been critical participants in the construction of American identity from the 16th century onwards when Muslim slaves were forcibly brought to Colonial America. Our course will explore the diverse ways Muslims in America have imagined, practiced, and negotiated their religious identity. We will move chronologically, and we will focus upon three crucial themes: the convergence of constructions of racial, religious, and national identities in America; the ever-shifting terrain of notions of authority and authenticity amongst Muslims in America; and global resonances of the practices and ideas of American Muslims.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Morgan, A. (PI)

HISTORY 1A: Global History: The Ancient World (CLASSICS 76)

World history from the origins of humanity to the Black Death. Focuses on the evolution of complex societies, wealth, violence, and hierarchy, emphasizing the three great turning points in early history: the evolution of modern humans, the agricultural revolution, and the rise of the state.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 1B: Global History: The Early Modern World, 1300 to 1800

Topics include early globalization and cross-cultural exchanges; varying and diverse cultural formations in different parts of the world; the growth and interaction of empires and states; the rise of capitalism and the economic divergence of "the west"; changes in the nature of technology, including military and information technologies; migration of ideas and people (including the slave-trade); disease, climate, and environmental change over time. Designed to accommodate beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 1C: Global History: The Modern Age

Explores the making of our modern world. Investigates the interconnected histories of revolution, war, imperialism, migration, race, slavery, democracy, rebellion, nationalism, feminism, socialism, fascism, genocide, anti-colonialism, neoliberalism, and populist authoritarianism. Analyzing memoirs, novels, films, and other sources, we will investigate how key political ideas have transformed societies, cultures, and economies across the globe from the late eighteenth century through to the present.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Crews, R. (PI)

HISTORY 3N: Terrorism

Why do we categorize some acts of violence as terrorism? How do the practitioners of such violence legitimize their actions? What are the effects of terror on culture, society, and politics? This course explores these questions around the globe from the nineteenth century to the present. Topics include the Russian populists, Ku Klux Klan, IRA, al Qaida, state terror, and the representation of terrorism in law, journalism, literature, film, and TV.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Crews, R. (PI)

HISTORY 4N: A World History of Genocide (JEWISHST 4N)

Reviews the history of genocide from ancient times until the present. Defines genocide, both in legal and historical terms, and investigates its causes, consequences, and global dimensions. Issues of prevention, punishment, and interdiction. Main periods of concern are the ancient world, Spanish colonial conquest; early modern Asia; settler genocides in America, Australia, and Africa; the Armenian genocide and the Holocaust; genocide in communist societies; and late 20th century genocide.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 25N: Stalin's Europe, 1944-1948

This freshman seminar explores the history of wartime and postwar Europe through the lenses of the communist parties of Europe, the anti-Soviet forces on the continent, the devastation of the civilian population, and the intentions and actions of the Soviet Union on the one hand, and the United States on the other. We will analyze issues of resistance and collaboration under the Nazis, Allied occupation, and the division of Europe. We will also consider the forcible displacement of peoples and the fate of Jewish survivors. The idea is to understand the harsh and complex realities of European life and politics in this crucial time frame spanning war and peace. One can discover the beginnings of the Cold War in this period, the first signs of the "Iron Curtain," and the origins of the European Union. Our sources for the reconstruction of European life at this crucial time include documents, memoirs, literature, film, and various collections at the Hoover Archives. In addition to analyzing written and visual materials in discussion, presentations, and short essays, you will engage in a quarter long project on one thematic or country study during this period.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 36N: Gay Autobiography (FEMGEN 36N)

Preference to freshmen. Gender, identity, and solidarity as represented in nine autobiographies: Isherwood, Ackerley, Duberman, Monette, Louganis, Barbin, Cammermeyer, Gingrich, and Lorde. To what degree do these writers view sexual orientation as a defining feature of their selves? Is there a difference between the way men and women view identity? What politics follow from these writers' experiences?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Robinson, P. (PI)
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