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1 - 10 of 17 results for: ILAC ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ILAC 102N: The Memory of the Eye: Traces of dictatorship in films form the Iberian Peninsula

Through major Spanish, Portuguese, Basque, and Catalan films from the last quarter of the 20th century to the present, this course will explore the complexities of individual recollection under conditions of collective trauma and political distortion of the past. Films by Saura, Almodovar, Amenobar, Erice, Marco Martins, Maria de Medeiros, Julio Medem, Almodovar, Bigas Luna, Ventura Pons, and Agusto­ Villaronga. A festival for the eye and the mind.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Resina, J. (PI)

ILAC 113Q: Borges and Translation (DLCL 113Q)

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 130: Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives

The purpose of this course is to study major figures and historical trends in modern Iberia against the background of the linguistic plurality and social and cultural complexity of the Iberian world. We will study the fundamental issues of empire, the Napoleonic occupation of Spain, Latin American independence, recurring civil wars, federal republicanism, and the historic nationalisms (Galician, Basque, and Catalan), all leading up to the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), which is a defining moment in modern Spanish and European history, with ongoing consequences still felt and debated painfully today in contemporary Spain. This course is designed to help prepare students for their participation in the Stanford overseas study programs in Barcelona and Madrid. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 161: Modern Latin American Literature

From independence to the present. Topics include romantic allegories of thennation; modernism and postmodernism; avant-garde poetry; regionalism versus cosmopolitanism; indigenous and indigenist literature; magical realism and the literature of the boom; Afro-Hispanic literature; and testimonial narrative. Authors may include: Bolívar, Bello, Gómez de Avellaneda, Isaacs, Sarmiento, Machado de Assis, Darío, Martí­, Agustini, Vallejo, Huidobro, Borges, Cortázar, Neruda, Guillon, Rulfo, Ramos, Garcí­a Marquez, Lispector, and Bolaño. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 199: Individual Work

Open only to students in the department, or by consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 219: Lusophone Africa

Focus on representative authors and works of modern Lusophone African literature (the literatures of Angola, Cabo Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, and São Tomé e Príncipe) as well as relevant work in post-colonial theory. Students may take the course in English (3 units) or in English and Portuguese (5 units). Students who choose to take the course for five units must attend the Friday Portuguese discussion section.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 239: Borges and Translation (DLCL 239)

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 268: Cultural Policies in Latin America and Europe. 1980-2015.

The purpose of this seminar is to provide an approach to the dominant conceptions about culture and cultural policies, starting with the doctrine of UNESCO about the protection of cultural diversity. We will compare different developments of those ideas and policies in Europe and in Latin America. We will study some policies on specific cultural fields (education, cultural heritage, infrastructures and access to culture, communications and social languages, entertainment and performing arts, content production and distribution industry, etc.) Finally, we will analyze the current public policies of European and Latin American states, in a changing cultural age determined by globalization, computing development, digitization and the prominence of networks and download and interconnection technologies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 277: Spanish and Society: Rock en EspaƱol

Can music be a medium to study how a society communicates? This course wants to answer this question by paying attention to how has Spanish changed and adapted in recent history. Taking rock and pop as a global musical phenomenon, the focus of the course will be the most prominent bands and songs in Spanish language. Emphasis is on the analysis of the use of Spanish in real-world contexts. In Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Briceno, X. (PI)

ILAC 279: Searching for identity

The course will involve extensive and detailed reading, in addition to listening and viewing of materials that represent different modes of artistic expression. We will use literature, music/voice/sound, and film as tools in the process of self-discovery and re-discovery. Some of the questions we will address are: why do we write or speak in a certain way? Why might a particular musical piece, or a certain film, allow us to express who we are? How might our cultural background affect our preference for a work of art? What does that say about us? Further, do we see ourselves as part of a collective or as individuals? Focusing on a different artistic medium each week, the students will choose a work reflecting their individuality to bring for discussion within the group.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Rulfo, J. (PI)
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