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11 - 20 of 88 results for: GERMAN

GERMAN 120: Contemporary Politics in Germany

This course provides an opportunity to engage with issues and actors, politicians and parties in contemporary Germany, while building German language abilities. We will work with current events texts, news reports, speeches and websites. Course goals include building analytic and interpretive capacities of political topics in today's Europe, including the European Union, foreign policy, and environmentalism. Differences between US and German political culture are a central topic. At least one year German language study required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 120N: The Brothers Grimm and Their Fairy Tales

Historical, biographical, linguistic, and literary look at the Kinder- and Hausmarchen of Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm. Readings from the fairy tales, plus materials in other media such as film and the visual arts. Four short essays, one or two oral reports. Preference to Freshmen; class then opens to all. Fulfills WIM for German majors (must be taken for letter grade.) In German.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 120Q: Contemporary Politics in Germany

This course provides an opportunity to engage with issues and actors, politicians and parties in contemporary Germany, while building German language abilities. We will work with current events texts, news reports, speeches and websites. Course goals include building analytic and interpretive capacities of political topics in today's Europe, including the European Union, foreign policy, and environmentalism. Differences between US and German political culture are a central topic. At least one year German language study required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 121: Why So Serious? German Earnestness and its Cultural Origin

The stereotype of Germans having no sense of humor and being overly serious is a very persistent one. This course searches for the origins of this cultural stereotype and explores how this mentality manifests itself in modern German thought, literature, cinema, and popular culture. Do Germans find a particular joy in entertaining serious and depressive thoughts? Can we distinguish between different facets and styles of `genuinely German¿ seriousness? And finally, can we understand German culture better through an understanding of their genuine seriousness? Materials include works by: the brothers Grimm, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Murnau, Benn, Fassbinder, Bernhard, Adorno, Haneke. Taught in German. Prerequisite: Gerlang 1-3, or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fischer, A. (PI)

GERMAN 123: German Culture and Film

This course has two primary goals. First, it is designed to provide students with a visual and linguistic foundation for discussing and writing about German film from the Weimar period to the present. To that end we will review important genres, directors, and technological developments in the history of German film. Second, using film as a lens, we will examine several key moments in German cultural history from the 1920s to the present. Certain themes will reoccur throughout the course, including gender, the city, technology, violence, and social crisis. All materials and class discussion in German.(Meets Writing-in-the-Major requirement)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GERMAN 124: Introduction to German Lyric Poetry

Introduction to lyric poetry in German from the 18th century to the present. Readings include poems by Goethe, Holderlin, Brentano, Eichendorff, Heine, Rilke, Trakl, Celan, Brecht. Ways of thinking about and thinking with poetry. Focus on poetic form, voice, figural language, and the interaction of sensory registers. Taught in German, with attention to discussion and writing skills. Prerequisite: Gerlang 1-3 or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 126: Old Stories, New Media: Great German Tales and their Adaptations

There are some characters that we see again and again: the love-struck artist, the mad genius, and the valiant hero. Where do these tropes come from? How do they evolve through history? This course will survey German history through the eyes of some of its most well-known stories. We will explore how audience, medium, cultural ideals, and historical changes can transform the meaning of a narrative over time. The central aim of this course is to provide students with an analytical framework with which to approach an unfamiliar work of art or literature. The course also aims to improve students¿ German language proficiency and give students a broad understanding of German intellectual history. Taught in German.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 127: Modernity, Memory, Mourning: 20th Century German Short Fiction

Through a sampling of short stories and novellas from 1918 to 1952, this course will explore major historical and cultural questions related to Germany in the early 20th century. Students will develop an understanding of recent German history and of how German writers have chosen to engage with this history in various ways. Themes will include the impact of modernity on the individual, violence and war, fascism and its effect on personal agency, exile and mourning, memory and trauma, and tradition and its breakdown. Authors include Kafka, Mann, Seghers, and Böll. Readings and discussion in German.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 128: Writing with Kafka (GERMAN 328)

This course explores Franz Kafka his literary work and biography, its themes and his contemporary significance through an array of heterogeneous materials and creative practices. Discussions of Kafka's short writings, correspondences and diary entries; feuilletons about Kafka, film and radio adaptations of his works. Exploring ways to make Krafka's creativity productive for their writing, students may study topics such as questions of textual criticism, humor, parody, the uncanny and the Kafkaesque in Kafka and today. Throughout, the seminar will tease out historical and cultural backgrounds of Kafka's work and life, and trace the crisis of modernity in his writings. Readings, discussions and writing creative projects and analytical writing in German.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 128N: Medicine, Modernism, and Mysticism in Thomas Mann's the Magic Mountain

Published in 1924, The Magic Mountain is a novel of education, tracing the intellectual growth of a budding engineer through a maze of intellectual encounters during a seven- year sojourn in a sanatorium set high in the Swiss Alps. It engages with the key themes of modernism: the relativity of time, the impact of psychoanalysis, the power of myth, and an extended dispute between an optimistic belief in progress and a pessimistic vision of human nature. Through its detailed discussion of disease (tuberculosis), this remarkable text connects the study of medicine to the humanities. There will be an exploration of this rich and profound novel both as a document of early twentieth-century Europe and as a commentary on the possibilities of education that are urgent for liberal arts education today. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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