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1 - 10 of 15 results for: ARCHLGY ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ARCHLGY 1: Introduction to Prehistoric Archeology (ANTHRO 3)

Aims, methods, and data in the study of human society's development from early hunters through late prehistoric civilizations. Archaeological sites and remains characteristic of the stages of cultural development for selected geographic areas, emphasizing methods of data collection and analysis appropriate to each.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Rick, J. (PI)

ARCHLGY 10: The Archaeology of Home (ANTHRO 10A)

Homes evoke powerful emotions about place and also highlight the dynamic and complex nature of people, their relationships, and the broader society they live in. Focus on the ways that material traces from the past shed light on the diversity of domestic life, which includes household organization, economic strategies, diet and status, rituals, and identity. Archaeological case studies to see how archaeologists identify reoccurring patterns in material culture found in homes or domestic dwellings to reconstruct household patterns and social relations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Bautista, S. (PI)

ARCHLGY 103: History of Archaeological Thought

Introduction to the history of archaeology and the forms that the discipline takes today, emphasizing developments and debates over the past five decades. Historical overview of culture, historical, processual and post-processual archaeology, and topics that illustrate the differences and similarities in these theoretical approaches.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Meskell, L. (PI)

ARCHLGY 111: Emergence of Chinese Civilization from Caves to Palaces (CHINGEN 141, CHINGEN 241)

Introduces processes of cultural evolution from the Paleolithic to the Three Dynasties in China. By examining archaeological remains, ancient inscriptions, and traditional texts, four major topics will be discussed: origins of modern humans, beginnings of agriculture, development of social stratification, and emergence of states and urbanism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Liu, L. (PI)

ARCHLGY 124: Archaeology of Food: production, consumption and ritual (ARCHLGY 224)

This course explores many aspects of food in human history from an archaeological perspective. We will discuss how the origins of agriculture helped to transform human society; how food and feasting played a prominent role in the emergence of social hierarchies and the development of civilization; and how various foodways influenced particular cultures. We will also conduct experimental studies to understand how certain methods of food procurement, preparation, and consumption can be recovered archaeologically.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Liu, L. (PI)

ARCHLGY 13: Islamic Routes: Archaeology and Heritage of Muslim Societies (ANTHRO 13A, HISTORY 7E, HISTORY 107E)

How has archaeology changed our knowledge of the spread of Islam and past Muslim societies? How does archaeology shape heritage debates, conflicts and ideas about Islam today? Topics include the city and urban change, secular and religious life, gender, economy, and globalization. These topics are explored using archaeological and critical heritage approaches. Focus is on examples drawn from Syria-Palestine, Egypt, Iraq, Arabian Peninsula, India, and Africa. Sources include archaeological data and material culture, historical texts in translation, and photography.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Simpson, I. (PI)

ARCHLGY 151: Ten Things: An Archaeology of Design (CLASSICS 151)

(Formerly CLASSART 113/213.) Connections among science, technology, society and culture by examining the design of a prehistoric hand axe, Egyptian pyramid, ancient Greek perfume jar, medieval castle, Wedgewood teapot, Edison's electric light bulb, computer mouse, Sony Walkman, supersonic aircraft, and BMW Mini. Interdisciplinary perspectives include archaeology, cultural anthropology, science studies, history and sociology of technology, cognitive science, and evolutionary psychology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shanks, M. (PI)

ARCHLGY 224: Archaeology of Food: production, consumption and ritual (ARCHLGY 124)

This course explores many aspects of food in human history from an archaeological perspective. We will discuss how the origins of agriculture helped to transform human society; how food and feasting played a prominent role in the emergence of social hierarchies and the development of civilization; and how various foodways influenced particular cultures. We will also conduct experimental studies to understand how certain methods of food procurement, preparation, and consumption can be recovered archaeologically.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Liu, L. (PI)

ARCHLGY 34: Animals and Us (ANTHRO 34)

The human-animal relationship is dynamic, all encompassing and durable. Without exception, all socio-cultural groups have evidenced complex interactions with the animals around them, both domesticated and wild. However, the individual circumstances of these interactions are hugely complicated, and involve much more than direct human-animal contact, going far beyond this to incorporate social, ecological and spiritual contexts.n This course delves into this complexity, covering the gamut of social roles played by animals, as well as the methods and approaches to studying these, both traditional and scientific. While the notion of `animals as social actors¿ is well acknowledged, their use as proxies for human autecology (the relationship between a species and its environment) is also increasingly recognized as a viable mechanism for understanding our cultural and economic past. It will piece together the breadth of human-animal relationships using a wide geographic range of case studies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Seetah, K. (PI)

ARCHLGY 51: Introduction to the Archaeology of Greece (CLASSICS 51)

An introduction to the archaeology of ancient Greece, from the first city states through the cultural achievements of classical Athens to the conquest by Rome.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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