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1 - 10 of 52 results for: REES

REES 18: Understanding the Jews of Russia and Poland

A preparatory course, for field trip to Moscow and Warsaw, that would cover Russian and Polish History, former Soviet Jewry, international relations, and current social realities
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2011 | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit

REES 23: Issues in Global Health: Russia and Eastern Europe

Activity course features Stanford faculty and researchers who lecture weekly on their experiences working international health issues. Focus this year will be on the global region including Russia, and East Europe.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2013 | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

REES 35: Films of Central Asia

Films with English subtitles from Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Turkmenistan. May be repeated once for credit. (AU)
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

REES 54A: Central Asia Through Films: A Weekly 3-Hour Seminar (ANTHRO 54A)

Through films this course explores major issues of contemporary peoples of Central Asia while learning fundamental concepts in cultural anthropology. In this seminar we will consider a wide range of examples, including first of all the new feature films, which will be used as a window into the modern reality and therefore could be served in a certain sense as anthropological fieldwork data. Films are prearranged by the instructor according to certain thematic subjects for in-class discussions.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

REES 85B: Jews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Visibility and Vulnerability (CSRE 85B, HISTORY 85B, JEWISHST 85B)

(Same as HISTORY 185B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 185B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

REES 100: Current Issues in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies (REES 200)

Enrollment limited to REEES students. Scholars present analyses of methodologies, challenges, and current issues in the study of Russia, E. Europe, and Eurasia.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

REES 105: Central and East European Politics (REES 205)

Focus is on how the states of Central and East Europe, including the Baltic states, have moved from communism and the Soviet Bloc to democracy, NATO and the EU. Topics include the communist legacy, transitions and their legacies, ethnic issues, and the evolution of economic and social policies, and the comparison of democratization processes in these countries to democracies in other regions, such as Latin America and southern Europe.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2008 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

REES 130: WIth God in Russia: Orthodox Christianity in the 19th and 20th Centuries (REES 330)

The experience of religion, particularly Orthodoxy, under tsars and commissars. Religion as a lived experience; practice and belief in the provinces and villages, intertwining of religion and folk customs (the so-called double faith); condition of the Church before and after the Revolutions of 1917; religion under Soviet control; and liberation of the Church since the collapse of the Soviet Union.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2008 | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

REES 145D: Jewish American Literature (AMSTUD 145D, ENGLISH 145D, JEWISHST 155D)

From its inception, Jewish-American literature has taken as its subject as well as its context the idea of Jewishness itself. Jewish culture is a diasporic one, and for this reason the concept of Jewishness differs from country to country and across time. What stays remarkably similar, though, is Jewish self-perception and relatedly Jewish literary style. This is as true for the first-generation immigrant writers like Isaac Bashevis Singer and Anzia Yezierska who came to the United States from abroad as it is for their second-generation children born in the United States, and the children of those children. In this course, we will consider the difficulties of displacement for the emigrant generation and their efforts to sustain their cultural integrity in the multicultural American environment. We'll also examine the often comic revolt of their American-born children and grandchildren against their (grand-)parents nostalgia and failure to assimilate. Only by considering these transnati more »
From its inception, Jewish-American literature has taken as its subject as well as its context the idea of Jewishness itself. Jewish culture is a diasporic one, and for this reason the concept of Jewishness differs from country to country and across time. What stays remarkably similar, though, is Jewish self-perception and relatedly Jewish literary style. This is as true for the first-generation immigrant writers like Isaac Bashevis Singer and Anzia Yezierska who came to the United States from abroad as it is for their second-generation children born in the United States, and the children of those children. In this course, we will consider the difficulties of displacement for the emigrant generation and their efforts to sustain their cultural integrity in the multicultural American environment. We'll also examine the often comic revolt of their American-born children and grandchildren against their (grand-)parents nostalgia and failure to assimilate. Only by considering these transnational roots can one understand the particularity of the Jewish-American novel in relation to mainstream and minority American literatures. In investigating the link between American Jewish writers and their literary progenitors, we will draw largely but not exclusively from Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

REES 185B: Jews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Vulnerability and Visibility (CSRE 185B, HISTORY 185B, HISTORY 385C, JEWISHST 185B)

(Same as HISTORY 85B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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