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41 - 50 of 50 results for: REES

REES 320G: Demons, Witches, Old Believers, Holy Fools, and Folk Belief: Popular Religion in Russia (HISTORY 220G, HISTORY 320G, REES 220G)

19th and early 20th centuries. Peasants, parish priests, witches, possessed persons, cults and sects, old believers, saints, and women's religious communities. Nominally Christian, and members of the Orthodox Church, Russians embraced beliefs and customs that combined teaching from Church and folk traditions.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

REES 325: The Russian Empire Between Europe and Asia (HISTORY 225, HISTORY 325)

Analyzes theoretical construct of "Eurasian Empire" and assesses how well the early modern Russian empire (1450- 1800) fits the concept; sets Russian empire in European and Asian context.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kollmann, N. (PI)

REES 327: All Quiet on the Eastern Front? East Europe and Russia in the First World War (HISTORY 227D, HISTORY 327D, REES 227)

Until recently history has been comparatively quiet about the experience of World War I in the east. Far from being a peripheral theater of war, however, the experiences of war on the Eastern Front were central to shaping the 20th century. Not only was the first shot of the war fired in the east, it was also the site of the most dramatic political revolution. Using scholarly texts, literature and film, this course combines political, military, cultural and social approaches to introduce the causes, conduct and consequences of World War I with a focus on the experiences of soldiers and civilians on the Eastern Front. Topics include: the war of movement, occupation, extreme violence against civilians, the Armenian genocide, population exchanges, the Russian Revolution and civil war, and the disintegration of empires and rise of nation-states.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Knezevic, J. (PI)

REES 330: WIth God in Russia: Orthodox Christianity in the 19th and 20th Centuries (REES 130)

The experience of religion, particularly Orthodoxy, under tsars and commissars. Religion as a lived experience; practice and belief in the provinces and villages, intertwining of religion and folk customs (the so-called double faith); condition of the Church before and after the Revolutions of 1917; religion under Soviet control; and liberation of the Church since the collapse of the Soviet Union.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

REES 335A: Animism and Alter-Native Modernities (ANTHRO 335A, FRENCH 335A)

For many years indigenous knowledges were treated as a field of research for anthropologists and as "mistaken epistemologies," i. e., unscientific and irrational folklore and childish worldviews. This old view of animism was a product of the evolutionist and anthropocentric worldview of the Enlightenment. However within the framework of ecological humanities, current interest in posthumanism, postsecularism and discussions on building altermodernity (Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri), indigenous thought is used to critique modern epistemology and develop an alternative to the Western worldview. Treating native thought as an equivalent to Western knowledge is presented as a decolonizing and liberating practice. The term alter-native modernities as response to the challenges of Euromodernity and suggests modernities that might emerge out of indigenous ways of being in the world. Comparison between literature on indigenous cultures from Latin America and from Russia (animism in Amazonia an more »
For many years indigenous knowledges were treated as a field of research for anthropologists and as "mistaken epistemologies," i. e., unscientific and irrational folklore and childish worldviews. This old view of animism was a product of the evolutionist and anthropocentric worldview of the Enlightenment. However within the framework of ecological humanities, current interest in posthumanism, postsecularism and discussions on building altermodernity (Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri), indigenous thought is used to critique modern epistemology and develop an alternative to the Western worldview. Treating native thought as an equivalent to Western knowledge is presented as a decolonizing and liberating practice. The term alter-native modernities as response to the challenges of Euromodernity and suggests modernities that might emerge out of indigenous ways of being in the world. Comparison between literature on indigenous cultures from Latin America and from Russia (animism in Amazonia and Siberia). Following recent works by anthropologists and archaeologists such as Nurit Bird-Rose, Philippe Descola, Graham Harvey, Tim Ingold and Viveiros de Castro, new animism is treated as an alternative (relational) ontology that allows rethinking the problem of matter and agency, goes beyond human exeptionalism and embraces non-humans. Topics include: alternative and alter-native modernities; Jean Piaget's theory of childhood animism; problem of anthropomorphism and personification; indigenous knowledge and the problem of epistemic violence; vitalist materialism (Jane Bennett, Rosi Braidotti); connectedness as the principle of life (relational epistemologies and ontologies); non-human agency (Bruno Latour).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

REES 340A: Post-secular Humanities: Religion and Spirituality in the Contemporary World (ANTHRO 340A, FRENCH 341A)

The term ¿postsecularism¿ refers to various theories and approaches regarding the revival of religion in the present, as well as current reevaluations of the relationship between faith and reason in knowledge building. When thinking about a postsecular humanities, the course would follow scholars that are usually associated with this trend (like Agamben, Badiou, Derrida, Habermas), on the one hand, and discuss Braidotti's ideas of a new vitalism, Chakrabarty's postcolonial postsecularism, and Harvey's new animism, on the other. The course will examine the way interactions and collisions among various worldviews can provoke the rethinking of key ideas of our times: what it means to be secular, religious, a citizen, a hybrid, an indigenous, a non-human.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

REES 371B: New Methodologies in the Humanities and Social Sciences (ANTHRO 371B, DLCL 371)

The course will discuss how social virtues are converted into methods of research (hope, friendship, sincerity, trust, utopia), and how they affect processes of knowledge building within the humanities and social sciences in terms of revival of futurity. The concepts will be critically examined in their positive as well as negative potential for practicing prefigurative politics the creation of desirable modes of social relationships of conviviality and co-existence in the world.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

REES 408C: Architecture, Acoustics and Ritual in Byzantium (ARTHIST 208C, ARTHIST 408C, CLASSICS 175, MUSIC 208C, MUSIC 408C, REES 208C, RELIGST 208C, RELIGST 308C)

Onassis Seminar "Icons of Sound: Architecture, Acoustics and Ritual in Byzantium". This year-long seminar explores the creation and operations of sacred space in Byzantium by focusing on the intersection of architecture, acoustics, music, and ritual. Through the support of the Onassis Foundation (USA), nine leading scholars in the field share their research and conduct the discussion of their pre-circulated papers. The goal is to develop a new interpretive framework for the study of religious experience and assemble the research tools needed for work in this interdisciplinary field.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

REES 409: Iconoclasm (ARTHIST 209C, ARTHIST 409, CLASSICS 158, CLASSICS 258)

By the seventh century three large political entities formed in the Mediterranean the Umayyads, the Carolingians, and the Byzantines each competed for legitimacy; all three emerged from the ashes of Late Antique culture, yet each tried to carve out an identity out of this common foundation. In this parting of the ways, the three empires took among others the issue of what constitutes an image and what role it plays in devotion. Eik'n, imago, ura became the basis on which to built differences and accuse the other political players of idolatry. This course explores medieval image theory, especially the phenomena of iconoclasm, iconophobia, and aniconism. The discussions focus on monuments in the Mediterranean as well as objects in the Cantor collection and facsimiles of manuscripts at the Bowes Art Library.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

REES 801: TGR Project

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Grading: TGR
Instructors: Knezevic, J. (PI)
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