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71 - 80 of 250 results for: all courses

CHEM 31X: Chemical Principles Accelerated

Accelerated; for students with substantial chemistry background. Chemical equilibria concepts, equilibrium constants, acids and bases, chemical thermodynamics, quantum concepts, models of ionic and covalent bonding, atomic and molecular orbital theory, periodicity, and bonding properties of matter. Recitation. Prerequisites: AP chemistry score of 5 or passing score on chemistry placement test, and AP Calculus AB score of 4 or Math 20. Recommended: high school physics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 33: Structure and Reactivity of Organic Molecules

Introduction to organic chemistry. Learn to relate three dimensional structure of organic molecules to their chemical and physical properties. Introduced to a variety of functional groups that exhibit patterns of reactivity and learn how to predict products of a reaction in the context of thermodynamics and kinetics. Two hour weekly lab section accompanies the course to introduce the techniques of separation and identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: 31A,B, or 31X, or AP Chemistry score of 5.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 134: Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

Classical analysis methods, statistical analyses, chromatography, and spectroscopy will be covered with an emphasis upon quantitative measurements and data analysis. WIM course with full lab reports and oral communication. Concludes with student-developed quantitative project. Prerequisite: Chem 35
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHEMENG 20: Introduction to Chemical Engineering (ENGR 20)

Overview of chemical engineering through discussion and engineering analysis of physical and chemical processes. Topics: overall staged separations, material and energy balances, concepts of rate processes, energy and mass transport, and kinetics of chemical reactions. Applications of these concepts to areas of current technological importance: biotechnology, energy, production of chemicals, materials processing, and purification. Prerequisite: CHEM 31.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHEMENG 80Q: Art, Chemistry, and Madness: The Science of Art Materials

Preference to sophomores. Chemistry of natural and synthetic pigments in five historical palettes: earth (paleolithic), classical (Egyptian, Greco-Roman), medieval European (Middle Ages), Renaissance (old masters), and synthetic (contemporary). Composite nature of paints using scanning electron microscopy images; analytical techniques used in art conservation, restoration, and determination of provenance; and inherent health hazards. Paintings as mechanical structures. Hands-on laboratory includes stretching canvas, applying gesso grounds, grinding pigments, preparing egg tempera paint, bamboo and quill pens, gilding and illumination, and papermaking.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHPR 130: Human Nutrition (HUMBIO 130)

The study of food, and the nutrients and substances therein. Their action, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease. Emphasis is on the biological, chemical, and physiological processes by which humans ingest, digest, absorb, transport, utilize, and excrete food. Dietary composition and individual choices are discussed in relationship to the food supply, and to population and cultural, race, ethnic, religious, and social economic diversity. The relationships between nutrition and disease; ethnic diets; vegetarianism; nutritional deficiencies; nutritional supplementation; phytochemicals. HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 130. CHPR master's students must enroll for a letter grade. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Gardner, C. (PI)

COMPMED 80N: Animal behavior: sex, death, and sometimes food!

Preference to freshman. Behavior is what makes animals special (thirsty plants don't walk to water), but why do animals behave the way they do? What does their behavior tell us about their inner lives, and about ourselves? What do lipstick and cuckoos and fireflies have in common? Why would nobody want to be a penguin? What do mice say to each other in their pee-mail? Learning how to think about questions like these gives us a unique perspective on the natural world. Format: Discussion and criticism of video examples, documentaries, and research papers. Topics: History and approaches to animal behavior; development of behavior, from genetics to learning; mechanisms of behavior, from neurons to motivation; function of behavior, from honest signals to selfish genes; the phylogeny of behavior, from domestication to speciation; and modern applications of behavior, from abnormal behavior, to conservation, to animal welfare, and animal consciousness.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Garner, J. (PI)

COMPMED 81N: Comparative Anatomy and Physiology of Mammals

Preference to freshmen. Emphasis is on a comparative approach to anatomy and physiology of a wide range of mammals, the unique adaptations of each species in terms of its anatomical, and behavioral characteristics, and how these species interact with human beings and other animals. Dissection required. Class size is limited to 16.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Bouley, D. (PI)

COMPMED 84Q: Globally Emerging Zoonotic Diseases

Preference to sophomores. Infectious diseases impacting veterinary and human health around the world today. Mechanisms of disease, epidemiology, and underlying diagnostic, treatment and control principles associated with these pathogens.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Felt, S. (PI)

COMPMED 87Q: Laboratory Mouse in Biomedical Research

Preference to sophomores. Focus is on the laboratory mouse, a widely used and important research model. Topics include the ethics of animal use in research; the natural history, origin and husbandry of the mouse; characteristics of key mouse strains; its anatomy and physiology; common diseases and their effects on research; coat color genetics relative to human diseases; immunodeficient mouse models; and genetic engineering of mice. The laboratory includes necropsy, handling, introduction to anesthesia and surgery, identification methods, and common research techniques using live and dead mice. Enrollment limited to 14 students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Nagamine, C. (PI)
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