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51 - 60 of 250 results for: all courses

BIOHOPK 47: Ecology and Ecological Physiology

This course is a field-based inquiry into rocky intertidal shores that introducesnstudents to ecology and environmental physiology and the research methods used to study them. Students will learn how to detect patterns quantitatively in nature through appropriate sampling methods & statistical analysis. Following exploration of appropriate background material in class and through exploration of the scientific literature, students will learn how to formulate testable hypotheses regarding the underlying causes of the patterns they discern. A variety of different aspects of ecology and physiology will be investigated cooperatively by the students during the quarter, culminating in development of an individual final paper in the form of a research proposal based on data collected during the course. The course will provide a broad conceptual introduction to the underlying biological principles that influence adaptation to the planet¿s dynamic habitats, as well as inquiry-based experience in how to explore and understand complex systems in nature. nThis course fulfills the same laboratory requirement as BIO 47. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 150H: Ecological Mechanics (BIOHOPK 250H)

(Graduate students register for 250H.) The principles of life's physical interactions. We will explore basic physics. fluid mechanics, thermal dynamics, and materials science to see how the principles of these fields can be used to investigate ecology at levels from the individual to the community. Topics include: diffusion, boundary layers, fluid-dynamic forces, locomotion, heat-budget models, fracture mechanics, adhesion, beam theory, the statistics of extremes, and the theory of self-organization. Open to students from all backgrounds. Some familiarity with basic physics and calculus advantageous but not necessary.
Terms: given next year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 154H: Animal Diversity: An Introduction to Evolution of Animal Form and Function from Larvae to Adults (BIOHOPK 254H)

Survey of invertebrate diversity, emphasizing form and function of both adult and larval life history stages. Focuses on how morphology, life histories, and development contribute to current views of the evolutionary diversification of multicellular animals. Labs are a hands-on exploration of animal diversity using local marine species as examples, as well as techniques of obtaining, handling, and maintaining larvae from early development through settlement. Lectures, labs, plus field trips. Satisfies Central Menu Area 3 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent of instructors.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 7 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 155H: Developmental Biology and Evolution (BIOHOPK 255H)

(Graduate students register for 255) This course focusses on how animals form their basic body plans; from the formation of their germ layers; ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm, to how they are organized along the main developmental axes; the anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes. The course will focus in part on the molecular mechanisms that underlie these developmental decisions from work carried out in established developmental model species. However, we will also explore the current understanding of how these mechanisms evolved from new insights from emerging models representing a broad range of animal phyla. The setting at Hopkins Marine Station will allow us to carry out experiments from animals collected in the field, and the course will involve a substantial lab component to complement concepts and approaches presented in lecture. nPre-requisites : Biocore or by permission of instructor
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 161H: Invertebrate Zoology (BIOHOPK 261H)

(Graduate students register for 261H.) Survey of invertebrate diversity emphasizing form and function in a phylogenetic framework. Morphological diversity, life histories, physiology, and ecology of the major invertebrate groups, concentrating on local marine forms as examples. Current views on the phylogenetic relationships and evolution of the invertebrates. Lectures, lab, plus field trips. Satisfies Central Menu Area 3 for Bio majors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Watanabe, J. (PI)

BIOHOPK 163H: Oceanic Biology (BIOHOPK 263H)

(Graduate students register for 263H.) How the physics and chemistry of the oceanic environment affect marine plants and animals. Topics: seawater and ocean circulation, separation of light and nutrients in the two-layered ocean, oceanic food webs and trophic interactions, oceanic environments, biogeography, and global change. Lectures, discussion, and field trips. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Bio majors. Recommended: PHYSICS 21 or 51, CHEM 31, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 172H: Marine Ecology: From Organisms to Ecosystems (BIOHOPK 272H)

(Graduate students register for 272H.) This course incorporates the approaches of experimental ecology, biomechanics (ecomechanics), and physiology to develop an integrated perspective on the factors that govern the structures of marine ecosystems and how environment change, including anthropogenic influences, affects ecosystems' species composition and health. Focus is on rocky intertidal, kelp forest, estuarine, and midwater ecosystems of Monterey Bay. Experimental projects done in the field offer experience in a variety of ecological techniques and in analysis of ecological data. Students will engage in presentation and debates of current topics in marine ecology and conservation. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Fulfills WIM in Biology.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Micheli, F. (PI)

BIOHOPK 179H: Physiological Ecology of Marine Megafauna (BIOHOPK 279H)

(Graduate students register for 279H.) The ocean is home to the largest animals of all-time. How, when, and why did gigantism evolve in different taxa? What are the consequences of large body size? This course will focus on how biological processes scale with body size, with an emphasis on oceanic megafauna including marine mammals, birds, fishes, and reptiles. In particular, the course will explore the functional mechanisms that generate the scaling relationships for physiological and ecological traits, such as metabolism, ecosystem function and body size evolution. Students will also be introduced to state-of-the-art technologies used to student marine megafauna in some of the most logistically challenging habitats on earth.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 182H: Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 323H, EARTHSYS 323, ESS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 16 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOHOPK 185H: Ecology and Conservation of Kelp Forest Communities (BIOHOPK 285H)

(Graduate students register for 285H.) Five week course. Daily lectures, labs, and scuba dives focused on kelp forest biology. Topics include identification and natural history of resident organisms, ecological processes that maintain biodiversity and community organization, field methods, data analysis, and research diving techniques. Class projects contribute to ongoing studies associated with Hopkins Marine Life Observatory. It is recommended that students complete one of Stanford's Scientific Diver Training sessions, offered during spring break and the week before the course starts, although this is not a requirement. Prerequisites: consent of instructor; advanced scuba certification and scuba equipment.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Watanabe, J. (PI)
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