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1 - 10 of 50 results for: SOC ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

SOC 8: Sport, Competition, and Society

This course uses the tools of social science to help understand debates and puzzles from contemporary sports, and in doing so shows how sports and other contests provide many telling examples of enduring social dynamics and larger social trends. We also consider how sport serves as the entry point for many larger debates about the morality and ethics raised by ongoing social change.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 14N: Inequality in American Society

An overview of the major forms of inequality in American society, their causes and consequences. Special attention will devoted to to public policy associated with inequality.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 17N: Race and Politics: Perspectives on the 2016 Presidential Election (AFRICAAM 17N, CSRE 17N)

This course is intended as a seminar-based exploration of the complex ways that race has informed political behavior and attitudes during the 2016 Presidential election. The class is designed to introduce freshman to sociological ways of understanding the social world, and the rigors of college thinking more broadly. As a group we will explore the mechanisms through which race informs political behavior, while also paying close attention to the ways that politics also informs our understanding of race. The course treats ¿race¿ as multifaceted construct, with multiple (and often times conflicting) influences on political behavior. The course stresses thenconstructed nature of both race and politics. The course will be split into 3 parts. In the first partnwe will explore the relationship between racial identity and political behavior at the individualnlevel. The second part of the course will examine how ideas about racial groups shape politicalnattitudes and behaviors, as well as policy outcomes. The third part of the course will explore hownrace is used to mobilize political and economic actors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fields, C. (PI)

SOC 45Q: Understanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society (CSRE 45Q)

Preference to sophomores. Historical overview of race in America, race and violence, race and socioeconomic well-being, and the future of race relations in America. Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 107E: Education and Inequality: Big Data for Large-Scale Problems (EDUC 107, EDUC 207, SOC 205)

In this course, students will use data from the Stanford Education Data Archive (SEDA) to study the patterns, causes, consequences, and remedies of educational inequality in the US. SEDA is based on 200 million test score records, administrative data, and census data from every public school, school district, and community in the US. The course will include lectures, discussion, and small group research projects using SEDA and other data.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 113: Comparative Corruption (POLISCI 143S)

Causes, effects, and solutions to various forms of corruption in business and politics in both developing regions (e.g. Asia, E. Europe) and developed ones (the US and the EU).
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Young, P. (PI)

SOC 114: Economic Sociology (SOC 214)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 130: Education and Society (EDUC 120C, EDUC 220C, SOC 230)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ramirez, F. (PI)

SOC 170: Classics of Modern Social Theory (SOC 270)

(Graduate students register for 270). Preference to Sociology majors. Contributions of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary sociology. Topics: the problem of social order and the nature of social conflict; capitalism and bureaucracy; the relationship between social structure and politics; the social sources of religion and political ideology; and the evolution of modern societies. Examples from contemporary research illustrate the impact of these traditions. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 190: Undergraduate Individual Study

Prior arrangement required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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