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1 - 10 of 18 results for: URBANST

URBANST 105: The Hipster and the City: Race, Ethnicity, Hip-Hop, and Gentrification in Oakland

This course introduces undergraduate students to the theory and methods of the geospatial approaches to urban problems like gentrification through urban storytelling, i.e.,listening to the stories that people tell about their experience in the city and interpreting these narratives with the aforementioned tools and analytical framework. nn Using social media, History pin software, Detour (Walking Tours,) and other spatial theory and technical learning methodologies including Google Street view and Tagging collectives, we will take Walking Tours through Oakland to understand gentrification. Students will select one of five areas of Oakland and interview people and record their stories. This is a course that is place-based audio storytelling with the Detour software that is used in Stanford¿s Media X department.nn As an urban storyteller, the student learns that stories are place-based. Next, the student learns how to find a Narrator, who can tell the story, and; finally, the student mus more »
This course introduces undergraduate students to the theory and methods of the geospatial approaches to urban problems like gentrification through urban storytelling, i.e.,listening to the stories that people tell about their experience in the city and interpreting these narratives with the aforementioned tools and analytical framework. nn Using social media, History pin software, Detour (Walking Tours,) and other spatial theory and technical learning methodologies including Google Street view and Tagging collectives, we will take Walking Tours through Oakland to understand gentrification. Students will select one of five areas of Oakland and interview people and record their stories. This is a course that is place-based audio storytelling with the Detour software that is used in Stanford¿s Media X department.nn As an urban storyteller, the student learns that stories are place-based. Next, the student learns how to find a Narrator, who can tell the story, and; finally, the student must discover what the story really is.nn We will meet the President of SPUR, an important lobbying organization for Oakland. We will also visit rapper and political leader, Boots Reily, and Radio DJ JR, visit with the Oakland Mayor, Libby Schaaf, and finally an interview with Crazy Kyle, who is self-described as a ¿White Negro.¿ nn Thus, the Urban Storyteller is both an observer and a participant who speaks to us about race, ethnicity, hip-hop, and gentrification in the American City, such as Oakland. The Corner is the place-based site for the intersection of oral and digital culture. But the Walking Tour is more dynamic.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Brown, C. (PI)

URBANST 111: Political Power in American Cities (AMSTUD 121Z, POLISCI 121, PUBLPOL 133)

The major actors, institutions, processes, and policies of sub-state government in the U.S., emphasizing city general-purpose governments through a comparative examination of historical and contemporary politics. Issues related to federalism, representation, voting, race, poverty, housing, and finances.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 131: VIP: Very Impactful People - Social Innovation & the Social Entrepreneur

Invited lecture series. Perspectives and endeavors of entrepreneurs and thought leaders who address social needs in the U.S. and internationally through private, for-profit and nonprofit organizations or public institutions. The lecture and Q&A is from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., followed by an optional discussion period with the speaker including dinner.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Litvak, L. (PI)

URBANST 134: Justice and Cities (POLISCI 233)

Cities have most often been where struggles for social justice happen, where injustice is most glaring and where new visions of just communities are developed and tested. This class brings political theories of justice and democracy together with historical and contemporary empirical work on city design, planning, and policies to ask the following questions: What makes a city just or unjust? How have people tried to make cities more just? What has made these efforts succeed or fail? Each session will include a case study of a particular city, largely with a focus on the United States. Students will develop research projects examining a city of their choice through the lens of a particular aspect of justice and injustice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Coyne, B. (PI)

URBANST 146: Retaking the Commons: Public Space and Heritage for Sustainable Cities

As cities develop and grow, green spaces, heritage sites, parks, and historic neighborhoods have come under increasing pressure. While common pool resources are held in the public trust, who governs them? Who advocates for them, and who enjoys them? Using economic, social, environmental and cultural lenses, this course explores how maintaining civic spaces, protecting heritage resources, and re-imagining the role of ¿public goods¿ in the life of a city can yield more sustainable and beneficial outcomes. We also consider best practices from UNESCO and UN HABITAT, and the crucial role of citizenship and democracy. Recommended field work in Hong Kong in September 2017
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Credit/No Credit

URBANST 156A: The Changing American City (CSRE 156, SOC 156A, SOC 256A)

After decades of decline, U.S. cities today are undergoing major transformations. Young professionals, Millenials, and members of the creative class are flocking to cities. Massive waves of immigration have transformed the racial and ethnic compositions of cities and their neighborhoods. Public housing projects that once defined the inner city are disappearing, and the recent housing boom and bust shook up the urban landscape. This class will include readings and discussion on contemporary developments in U.S. cities and how they relate to race, ethnicity, and class. Topics include immigration, gentrification, crime, public housing, and the housing crisis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hwang, J. (PI)

URBANST 164: Sustainable Cities (EARTHSYS 160)

Service-learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. Focus will be on the relationship of land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in team-based projects in collaboration with local community partners and take part in significant off-site fieldwork. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Chan, D. (PI)

URBANST 165: Sustainable Urban and Regional Transportation Planning

Environmental, economic, and equity aspects of urban transportation in 21st-century U.S. Expanded choices in urban and regional mobility that do not diminish resources for future generations. Implications for the global environment and the livability of communities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kott, J. (PI)

URBANST 174: Defining Smart Cities: Visions of Urbanism for the 21st Century (CEE 125, CEE 225)

In a rapidly urbanizing world, the city paves the way toward sustainability and social well-being. But what does it mean for a city to be smart? Does that also make it sustainable or resilient or livable? This seminar delves into current debates about urbanism through weekly talks by experts on topics such as big data, human-centered design, urban sustainability, and natural capital. The goal of the seminar is to explore how advances in information communication technologies affect the built environment at various scales (e.g., cities, districts, neighborhoods, blocks, buildings and to understand the role of multiple actors working at the intersection of technology and urbanism. The seminar will provoke vigorous discussion of how urban spaces are shaped, for better or worse, by the complex interaction of technology, human societies, and the natural environment. Students taking the course for 2 units / letter grade will propose an independent research project and present their work at a final symposium.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 177: Utopia and Reality in Modern Urban Planning

Although the word utopia was not coined by Thomas More until 1516, the idea of utopia is as old as the idea of the city itself. Visions of a perfect society or at least a better world, variously defined have always motivated builders of cities and guided their plans. And in the 19th and 20th centuries, a series of bold utopian proposals were central to the birth, development, and practice of a modern urban planning profession that continues to shape the urban world as we enter the 21st century. This course will examine the work of the classic urban utopian visionaries Ebenezer Howard's garden cities, Arturo Soria y Mata's linear cities, Le Corbusier's skyscrapers in a park, and Frank Lloyd Wright's Broadacre City within the larger context of the social critiques to be found in the vast literature of utopia everything from Edward Bellamy's Looking Backward of 1888 and Ernest Callenbach's Ecotopia of 1975 to the many contemporary visions of cyber-cities, autonomous technologies, online communities, and previously unimagined modalities of social progress and personal liberation. Bring your imagination.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Stout, F. (PI)
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