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1 - 10 of 54 results for: PWR

PWR 1AK: Writing & Rhetoric 1: The Rhetoric of Humor

In this class we will explore the how and why of humor through readings, classroom discussion, rhetorical analysis, and, most importantly, through writing, and examine the ways that humor, as a rhetorical tool, is deployed in written and oral texts. As we consider theories of humor, we will begin to understand how humor works and why it is so powerful. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. For more information about PWR 1, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-1. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 1AN: Writing & Rhetoric 1: The Rhetoric of Identity Cultivated Through a Hip-Hop World

This course seeks to explore the ways that we read and write ourselves into a world that is engrossed in Hip-Hop culture by asking: What does it mean to live in a world where Hip-Hop permeates every aspect of society? How can Hip-Hop culture be used to understand the rhetoric that is used in broader society in reference to both this moment in history and the culture itself? By engaging both Hip-Hop artists such as Kendrick Lamar and Nicki Manij, and artists that operate in a Hip-Hop world like Beyoncé, this course investigates the ways that we write ourselves into a world engrossed in Hip-Hop culture that denies the humanity and value of its members. For more information about PWR 1, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-1. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Newby, A. (PI)

PWR 1BK: Writing & Rhetoric 1: Writing What You Eat: The Rhetoric of Food

In this course, we will focus on the rhetoric of food in order to explore how our relationship to what we eat is reflected in writing about ourselves, our society, and our world. Essays, recipes, blog posts, and newspaper articles are some of the genres we will examine in order to explore how issues of identity, community, ethics, and wellness can be expressed in food writing. How does what we choose to eat reflect on how we see ourselves and the world around us? What responsibilities do we have, if any, as consumers of food in one of the world's richest nations? For more information about PWR 1, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-1. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kim, B. (PI)

PWR 1BRB: Writing & Rhetoric 1: In Another's Shoes: The Rhetoric of Empathy

Rhetorical analysis of readings, research, and argument. Focus is on development of a substantive research-based argument using multiple sources. Individual conferences with instructor. For more information about PWR 1, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-1. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 1CA: Writing & Rhetoric 1: The Rhetoric of Gaming

Rhetorical analysis of readings, research, and argument. Focus is on development of a substantive research-based argument using multiple sources. Individual conferences with instructor. For more information about PWR 1, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-1. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Alfano, C. (PI)

PWR 1CK: Writing & Rhetoric 1: Investigating the News: Journalism, Technology & the Future

Rhetorical analysis of readings, research, and argument. Focus is on development of a substantive research-based argument using multiple sources. Individual conferences with instructor. For more information about PWR 1, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-1. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kamrath, C. (PI)

PWR 1EE: Writing & Rhetoric 1: Prowling Toward Certainty: Exploration as Argument

In a culture that rewards people who write and speak with conviction, ambivalence often seems like a personal shortcoming that must be remedied with certainty. Isn't it better to be confident and decisive? Writing teachers and textbooks tend to reinforce this view, insisting that students present a strong thesis as soon as possible. Even if you address counterarguments and offer concessions, your argument should override if not demolish them in the end. Even if you feel deeply ambivalent about a topic during your research, your final draft must demonstrate unwavering conviction: you slam your fist and make your point. nnRecent research questions the value of unwavering conviction. For example, management scholar Christina Ting Fong notes, "The results from two laboratory experiments demonstrate that individuals experiencing emotional ambivalence are better at recognizing unusual relationships between concepts, therefore showing an ability believed to be important to organizational crea more »
In a culture that rewards people who write and speak with conviction, ambivalence often seems like a personal shortcoming that must be remedied with certainty. Isn't it better to be confident and decisive? Writing teachers and textbooks tend to reinforce this view, insisting that students present a strong thesis as soon as possible. Even if you address counterarguments and offer concessions, your argument should override if not demolish them in the end. Even if you feel deeply ambivalent about a topic during your research, your final draft must demonstrate unwavering conviction: you slam your fist and make your point. nnRecent research questions the value of unwavering conviction. For example, management scholar Christina Ting Fong notes, "The results from two laboratory experiments demonstrate that individuals experiencing emotional ambivalence are better at recognizing unusual relationships between concepts, therefore showing an ability believed to be important to organizational creativity." nnWhat if, instead of sweeping your ambivalence under the rug, you tried to embrace it in your research and foreground it in your writing? Is ambivalence always a liability? What advantages can be found in the deep, risky waters of uncertainty? How do scientists, social scientists, and humanists regard ambivalence? What do ambivalent texts look and feel like? Can they move and persuade us? Is it possible to map and tap into a rhetoric of ambivalence? nnIn this course, we'll explore such questions in an attempt to understand the relationship between ambivalence and persuasion. We'll analyze and discuss the ways that writers such as Annie Dillard, Stephen Jay Gould, and Michael Pollan not only engage their ambivalence but weave it into their prose. Most importantly, we'll explore how you can develop rhetorical strategies and habits of mind to achieve results in your own analytical and persuasive writing. We'll study how to craft compelling arguments that do fuller justice to complex emotions and ideas.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Ellis, E. (PI)

PWR 1EP: Writing & Rhetoric 1: The Rhetoric of Global Development and Social Change

Since World War II, international development projects have marked every sector of global society. We will unpack and interrogate the numerous discourses around international "development" as a strategy for achieving social change and look at how culture, history, politics, and economics have informed development's connections to capitalism, modernity, and most recently, globalization. For more information about PWR 1, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-1. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Polk, E. (PI)

PWR 1IF: Writing & Rhetoric 1: The Rhetoric of Language and Social Identity in America

Language and social identity are closely intertwined. Have you ever noticed that you change the way you speak to present a particular social identity? For example, have you ever switched between dialects or languages to show alignment with certain social groups or mark your 'in-group' status? Because language is flexible (and somewhat controllable), it can be used as a resource to create and index identity. However, given its flexible nature, criticizing someone's language often becomes a more socially acceptable way of attacking someone than something that seems like bald-faced racism/sexism/homophobia, etc. In this course we'll explore this complex link between identity and language.nnThis course explores the way language and social identity are defined, discussed, and debated in America, and the assumptions this rhetoric presents about race, class, education and other social identities more broadly. Together, we¿ll consider: What's it like to grow up monolingual versus bilingual or more »
Language and social identity are closely intertwined. Have you ever noticed that you change the way you speak to present a particular social identity? For example, have you ever switched between dialects or languages to show alignment with certain social groups or mark your 'in-group' status? Because language is flexible (and somewhat controllable), it can be used as a resource to create and index identity. However, given its flexible nature, criticizing someone's language often becomes a more socially acceptable way of attacking someone than something that seems like bald-faced racism/sexism/homophobia, etc. In this course we'll explore this complex link between identity and language.nnThis course explores the way language and social identity are defined, discussed, and debated in America, and the assumptions this rhetoric presents about race, class, education and other social identities more broadly. Together, we¿ll consider: What's it like to grow up monolingual versus bilingual or multilingual? What role do our ethnicity and/or race play in how our language skills are perceived? What role do language attitudes and stereotypes play in influencing our daily lives? What role does the media play? How is language discussed in politics? Students will be able to work on a research project related to social identity and language on a topic of their choice.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 1JJ: Writing & Rhetoric 1: The Rhetoric of Language and Thought

Rhetorical analysis of readings, research, and argument. Focus is on development of a substantive research-based argument using multiple sources. Individual conferences with instructor. For more information about PWR 1, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-1. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Johnson, J. (PI)
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