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1 - 10 of 102 results for: LAW ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

LAW 201: Civil Procedure I

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. This course is a study of the process of civil litigation from the commencement of a lawsuit through final judgment under modern statutes and rules of court, with emphasis on the federal rules of civil procedure. May include class participation, written assignments, or other elements. Your instructor will advise you of the basis for grading.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 205: Contracts

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It provides exposure to basic contract law. The course will identify the scope and purpose of the legal protection accorded to interests predicated on contract and will focus on problems of contract formation, interpretation, performance, and remedies for breach.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 207: Criminal Law

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It examines the traditional general issues in the substantive criminal law, including the purposes of punishment and the appropriate limits on the use of the criminal sanction. It focuses predominantly on how criminal statutes are organized around objective offense elements (conduct, causation, and attendant circumstances) and mental states, and to a lesser degree on inchoate crimes, complicity, justification and excuse.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 219: Legal Research and Writing

Legal Research and Writing is a two-unit course taught as a simulation. Students work on a legal problem starting with an initial interview, and they conduct fact investigation and legal research related to that problem. Students receive rigorous training in reading and analyzing legal authority, and in using persuasive strategies--legal analysis, narrative, rhetoric, legal theory, and public policy--to frame and develop legal arguments. Students write predictive memos and persuasive briefs, and are introduced to the professional norms of ethics, timeliness, and courtesy. This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 223: Torts

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It considers issues involved in determining whether the law should require a person to compensate for harm intentionally or unintentionally caused. These problems arise in situations as diverse as automobile collisions, operations of nuclear facilities, and consumption of defective food products. Among other considerations, the course explores various resolutions in terms of their social, economic, and political implications.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 400: Directed Research

Directed Research is an extraordinary opportunity for students beyond the first-year to research problems in any field of law. The final product must be embodied in a paper or other form of written work involving a substantial independent effort on the part of the student. A student must submit a detailed petition of at least 250 words, approved by the sponsoring faculty member, outlining his or her proposed project and demonstrating that the research is likely to result in a significant scholarly contribution. A petition will not be approved for work assigned or performed in a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has or will receive credit. A petition must indicate whether the product is intended for publication in a law review or elsewhere. A student may petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development" when the work involves assisting a Law School faculty member in developing concepts or materials for new and innovative law school courses. Both the supervising more »
Directed Research is an extraordinary opportunity for students beyond the first-year to research problems in any field of law. The final product must be embodied in a paper or other form of written work involving a substantial independent effort on the part of the student. A student must submit a detailed petition of at least 250 words, approved by the sponsoring faculty member, outlining his or her proposed project and demonstrating that the research is likely to result in a significant scholarly contribution. A petition will not be approved for work assigned or performed in a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has or will receive credit. A petition must indicate whether the product is intended for publication in a law review or elsewhere. A student may petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development" when the work involves assisting a Law School faculty member in developing concepts or materials for new and innovative law school courses. Both the supervising faculty member and the Associate Dean for Curriculum must approve petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development." Students must meet with the instructor frequently for the purposes of report and guidance. Unit credit is by arrangement. Students whose projects warrant more than four units should consider a Senior Thesis or the Research Track. See SLS Student Handbook for requirements and limitations. With the approval of the instructor, a directed research project of two-units or more may satisfy one research writing course (R course). Elements used in grading: As agreed to by instructor. Directed Research petitions are available on the Law School Registrar's Office website (see Forms and Petitions).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 403: Senior Thesis

An opportunity for third-year students to engage in original research and to prepare a substantial written-work product on the scale of a law review article. The thesis topic should be chosen no later than two weeks after the beginning of the seventh term of law study and may be chosen during the sixth term. The topic is subject to the approval of the thesis supervisor, who may be any member of the Law School faculty under whose direction the student wishes to write the thesis and who is willing to assume the responsibility therefor. An oral defense of the thesis before members of the faculty, including the thesis supervisor, will be conducted late in the student's ninth academic term. Acceptance of the thesis for credit requires the approval of the thesis supervisor and one or more other members of the faculty who will be selected by the supervisor. Satisfactory completion of the senior thesis will satisfy graduation requirements to the extent of (a) 5 - 8 units of credit and (b) two research courses. The exact requirements for a senior thesis are in the discretion of the supervising faculty member. Special Instructions: Two Research credits are possible. Elements Used in Grading: Paper
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 406: Research Track

The Research Track is for students who wish to carry out a research project of a scope larger than that contemplated for a Senior Thesis. Research Track projects are to be supervised by two or more professors, at least one of whom must be a member of the Law School faculty. At least one faculty member in addition to the supervisors must read the written product of the research, and the student must defend the written work orally before the readers. Students will be admitted to Research Track only if they have a demonstrated capability for substantial independent research, and propose a significant and well-formulated project at the time of application. Special Instructions: Two Research credits are possible. Elements Used in Grading: Paper
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 9-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 411: Directed Writing

Teams of students may earn "Directed Writing" credit for collaborative problems involving professional writing, such as briefs, proposed legislation or other legal writing. Only projects supervised by a member of the faculty (tenured, tenure-track, senior lecturer, or professor from practice) may qualify for Directed Writing credit. It will not necessarily be appropriate to require each member of the team to write the number of pages that would be required for an individual directed research project earning the number of units that each team member will earn for the team project. The page length guidelines applicable to individual papers may be considered in determining the appropriate page length, but the faculty supervisor has discretion to make the final page-length determination. Students must meet with the instructor frequently for the purposes of report and guidance. Unit credit is by arrangement. A petition will not be approved for work assigned or performed in a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has or will receive credit. Special Instructions: A Directed Writing project may not count as the equivalent of a "PW" (Professional Writing) course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 802: TGR: Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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