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1 - 10 of 10 results for: EARTH

EARTH 1A: Know Your Planet: Research Frontiers

Planet Earth is our only home and so it is critical that we understand how it works, from large-scale geologic processes that shape our continents, to biological processes that produce the air we breathe, to the origins of the energy sources we rely on, to the impacts of the human societies we have created. This course provides an introduction to the cutting edge research of Stanford Earth faculty, who are leading the effort to ask and answers these critical questions about our planet. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTH 5: Geokids: Earth Sciences Education

Service learning through the Geokids program. Eight weeks of supervised teaching to early elementary students about Earth sciences. Hands-on teaching strategies for science standards-based instruction.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Saltzman, J. (PI)

EARTH 10: Design for a Habitable Planet

Climate change is happening. As a society, we know we need to accommodate it, design for it, and slow its progress, yet as individuals many of us struggle to take meaningful action. This class will use the iconic landscapes of California as a lens to address this challenge. How will they differ in 2025, 2050, 2100? During the course we will learn about the science of global change and the ways in which California may dramatically differ in the future as a result of changing temperatures and rainfall patterns, rising sea levels, shifts in flora and fauna, and decisions about the built environment and infrastructure. Using methodologies of human-centered design, we will explore how iconic landscapes influence perceptions of global change. We will generate ideas for communicating the impact of projected change and experiment with different ways of creating a sense of urgency. This class is for students interested in the impacts global change and in seeking new and innovative ways to commu more »
Climate change is happening. As a society, we know we need to accommodate it, design for it, and slow its progress, yet as individuals many of us struggle to take meaningful action. This class will use the iconic landscapes of California as a lens to address this challenge. How will they differ in 2025, 2050, 2100? During the course we will learn about the science of global change and the ways in which California may dramatically differ in the future as a result of changing temperatures and rainfall patterns, rising sea levels, shifts in flora and fauna, and decisions about the built environment and infrastructure. Using methodologies of human-centered design, we will explore how iconic landscapes influence perceptions of global change. We will generate ideas for communicating the impact of projected change and experiment with different ways of creating a sense of urgency. This class is for students interested in the impacts global change and in seeking new and innovative ways to communicate it. The course will be co-taught by faculty from the School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences and the d.school. Apply by September 8. You can read more about the course and apply here: https://dschool.stanford.edu/classes/design-for-a-habitable-planet. Applicants will be selected to ensure a diversity of backgrounds. Course will be limited to 16 participants. Meeting times: Tue: 4:30 to 5:50 beginning 10/24, Saturday 10/28 All day field trip.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Maher, K. (PI)

EARTH 15: Living on the Edge (GS 5)

A weekend field trip along the Pacific Coast. Tour local beaches, geology, and landforms with expert guides from the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences. Enjoy a BBQ dinner and stay overnight in tents along the Santa Cruz coast. Get to know faculty and graduate students in Stanford Earth. Requirements: Two campus meeting and weekend field trip (Fall Quarter: October 14-15 OR October 21-22) to Pacific Coast. Enrollment limited to 25. Freshman have first choice. If you are interested in signing up for the course, complete this form: http://web.stanford.edu/~aferree/GS5.fb. The form will open August 1st.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTH 42: Landscapes and Tectonics of the San Francisco Bay Area (GS 42)

Active faulting and erosion in the Bay Area, and its effects upon landscapes. Earth science concepts and skills through investigation of the valley, mountain, and coastal areas around Stanford. Faulting associated with the San Andreas Fault, coastal processes along the San Mateo coast, uplift of the mountains by plate tectonic processes, and landsliding in urban and mountainous areas. Field excursions; student projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hilley, G. (PI)

EARTH 126X: Hard Earth: Stanford Graduate-Student Talks Exploring Tough Environmental Dilemmas (CEE 126X)

Stanford's graduate students are a trove of knowledge -- and, just as important, curiosity -- about environmental sustainability. This seminar will feature talks by graduate students that explore the biggest, most bedeviling questions about environmental sustainability locally and around the world. The course will be structured as follows: every other week, we will hear hour-long graduate student talks about sustainability questions and their research, and on the off weeks, we will discuss the unanswered, debatable questions that relate to the previous week's talk.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Lepech, M. (PI)

EARTH 211: Software Development for Scientists and Engineers (CME 211)

Basic usage of the Python and C/C++ programming languages are introduced and used to solve representative computational problems from various science and engineering disciplines. Software design principles including time and space complexity analysis, data structures, object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, and modularity are emphasized. Usage of campus wide Linux compute resources: login, file system navigation, editing files, compiling and linking, file transfer, etc. Versioning and revision control, software build utilities, and the LaTeX typesetting software are introduced and used to help complete programming assignments. Prerequisite: introductory programming course equivalent to CS 106A or instructor consent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTH 214: Software Design in Modern Fortran for Scientists and Engineers (CME 214)

This course introduces software design and development in modern Fortran. Course covers the functional, object-oriented-, and parallel programming features introduced in the Fortran 95, 2003, and 2008 standards, respectively, in the context of numerical approximations to ordinary and partial differential equations; introduces object-oriented design and design schematics based on the Unified Modeling Language (UML) structure, behavior, and interaction diagrams; cover the basic use of several open-source tools for software building, testing, documentation generation, and revision control. Recommended: Familiarity with programming in Fortran 90, basic numerical analysis and linear algebra, or instructor approval
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTH 400: Directed Research

Independent research for graduate student projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTH 401: Curricular Practical Training

Curricular Practical Training
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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