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1 - 10 of 17 results for: AFRICAAM ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

AFRICAAM 10A: Introduction to Identity, Diversity, and Aesthetics: Arts, Culture, and Pedagogy (CSRE 10A)

This weekly lecture series introduces students to the study of identity, diversity, and aesthetics through the work of leading artists and scholars affiliated with the Institute for Diversity in the Arts (IDA). This year's course highlights the educational impact of arts and culture. How can arts and culture help to advance pedagogies of liberation? Among other things, we will examine hip-hop education and how it illuminates ideas around culturally relevant and culturally sustaining pedagogies, indigenous knowledges, embodied knowledges, hip-hop feminisms, and community engaged research. We will look at case studies from East Palo Alto, CA and Cape Town, South Africa.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

AFRICAAM 20A: Jazz Theory (MUSIC 20A)

Introduces the language and sounds of jazz through listening, analysis, and compositional exercises. Students apply the fundamentals of music theory to the study of jazz. Prerequisite: 19 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Nadel, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 28: Health Impact of Sexual Assault and Relationship Abuse across the Lifecourse (HUMBIO 28)

Cross-listed with SOMGEN 237 and FEMGEN 237. HumBio students must enroll in HumBio 28 or AFRICAAM 28. An overview of the acute and chronic physical and psychological health impact of sexual abuse through the perspective of survivors of childhood, adolescent, young and middle adult, and elder abuse, including special populations such as pregnant women, military and veterans, prison inmates, individuals with mental or physical impairments. Also addresses: race/ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, and other demographic and societal factors, including issues specific to college culture. Professionals with expertise in sexual assault present behavioral and prevention efforts such as bystander intervention training, medical screening, counseling and other interventions to manage the emotional trauma of abuse. Undergraduates must enroll for 3 units. Medical and graduate students should enroll in SOMGEN 237 for 1-3 units. To receive a letter grade in any listing, students must enroll for 3 units. This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 30: The Egyptians (CLASSICS 82, HISTORY 48, HISTORY 148)

Overview of ancient Egyptian pasts, from predynastic times to Greco-Roman rule, roughly 3000 BCE to 30 BCE. Attention to archaeological sites and artifacts; workings of society; and cultural productions, both artistic and literary. Participation in class is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAAM 31: RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora

Students to engage in an intellectual discussion about the African Diaspora with leading faculty at Stanford across departments including Education, Linguistics, Sociology, History, Political Science, English, and Theater & Performance Studies. Several lunches with guest speakers. This course will meet in the Program for African & African American Studies Office in Building 360 Room 362B (Main Quad). This course is limited to Freshman and Sophomore enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

AFRICAAM 37: Chocolate Heads Performance Project: Dance & Intercultural Performance Creation (DANCE 30)

Students from diverse dance styles (ballet to hip-hop to contemporary) participate in the dance-making/remix process and collaborate with musicians, visual artists, designers and spoken word artists, to co-create a multidisciplinary finished production and installation. Students of all dance or athletic backgrounds are welcome to audition on Wednesday, September 28th and Monday, October 4th during class time. Visual artists, musicians and dancers may also contact the instructor for further information at ahayes1@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 43: Introduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature (AMSTUD 12A, ENGLISH 12A)

(Formerly English 43/143). In his bold study, What Was African American Literature?, Kenneth Warren defines African American literature as a late nineteenth- to mid-twentieth-century response to the nation's Jim Crow segregated order. But in the aftermath of the Jim Crow era and the Civil Rights movement, can critics still speak, coherently, of "African American literature"? And how does this political conception of African American literary production compare with accounts grounded in black language and culture? Taking up Warren's intervention, this course will explore African American literature from its earliest manifestations in the spirituals and slave narratives to texts composed at the height of desegregation and decolonization struggles at mid-century and beyond.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Rasberry, V. (PI)

AFRICAAM 47: History of South Africa (CSRE 74, HISTORY 47)

(Same as HISTORY 147. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Campbell, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 94: Public Space in Iran: Murals, Graffiti, Performance

This course examines the history and traditions of artistic engagement in public space in Iran. It offers a unique glimpse into Iran's contemporary art and visual culture through the investigation of public art practices and cultural expression, as well as older traditions of performing arts such as Parde-khani and Ta zieh. The course will be held in conjunction with the Stanford symposium, Art, Social Space and Public Discourse in Iran.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ebtekar, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 102B: Art and Social Criticism (AMSTUD 102, ARTHIST 162B, CSRE 102A, FEMGEN 102)

Visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America. Since the 1960s, various visual strategies have helped emergent progressive political movements articulate and represent complex social issues. Which artists and particular art works/projects have become key anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic and social inequality, immigrant rights and climate change? We will learn about a spectrum of political art designed to raise social awareness, spark social change and rouse protest. The Art Workers Coalition¿s agit-prop opposing the Vietnam War and ACT-UP¿s emblematic signs and symbols during the AIDS/HIV crisis of the 1980s galvanized a generation into action. Works such as Judy Chicago¿s The Dinner Party (1979), Fred Wilson¿s Mining the Museum (1992), and Glenn Ligon¿s paintings appropriating fragments from African-American literature all raised awareness by excavating historical evidence of the long legacy resisting marginalization. For three decades more »
Visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America. Since the 1960s, various visual strategies have helped emergent progressive political movements articulate and represent complex social issues. Which artists and particular art works/projects have become key anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic and social inequality, immigrant rights and climate change? We will learn about a spectrum of political art designed to raise social awareness, spark social change and rouse protest. The Art Workers Coalition¿s agit-prop opposing the Vietnam War and ACT-UP¿s emblematic signs and symbols during the AIDS/HIV crisis of the 1980s galvanized a generation into action. Works such as Judy Chicago¿s The Dinner Party (1979), Fred Wilson¿s Mining the Museum (1992), and Glenn Ligon¿s paintings appropriating fragments from African-American literature all raised awareness by excavating historical evidence of the long legacy resisting marginalization. For three decades feminist artists Barbara Kruger and the Guerilla Girls have combined institutional critique and direct address into a provocative form of criticality. Recent art for social justice is reaching ever broadening publics by redrawing the role of artist and audience exemplified by the democratization of poster making and internet campaigns of Occupy and the Movement for Black Lives. We will also consider the collective aesthetic activisms in the Post-Occupy era including Global Ultra Luxury Faction, Climate Justice art projects, and the visual culture of Trump era mass protests. Why are each of these examples successful as influential and enduring markers of social criticism? What have these socially responsive practices contributed to our understanding of American history?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hertz, B. (PI)
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