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1 - 10 of 84 results for: ENERGY

ENERGY 101: Energy and the Environment (EARTHSYS 101)

Energy use in modern society and the consequences of current and future energy use patterns. Case studies illustrate resource estimation, engineering analysis of energy systems, and options for managing carbon emissions. Focus is on energy definitions, use patterns, resource estimation, pollution. Recommended: MATH 21 or 42.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 102: Renewable Energy Sources and Greener Energy Processes (EARTHSYS 102)

The energy sources that power society are rooted in fossil energy although energy from the core of the Earth and the sun is almost inexhaustible; but the rate at which energy can be drawn from them with today's technology is limited. The renewable energy resource base, its conversion to useful forms, and practical methods of energy storage. Geothermal, wind, solar, biomass, and tidal energies; resource extraction and its consequences. Recommended: MATH 21 or 42.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 104: Transition to sustainable energy systems

This course explores the transition to a sustainable energy system at large scales (national and global), and over long time periods (decades). Explores the drivers of global energy demand and the fundamentals of technologies that can meet this demand sustainably. Focuses on constraints affecting large-scale deployment of technologies, as well as inertial factors affecting this transition. Problems will involve modeling global energy demand, deployment rates for sustainable technologies, technological learning and economics of technical change. Recommended: ENERGY 101, 102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 10SC: Energy in the West (CEE 15SC, POLISCI 23SC)

Students will explore practical, social, and political issues surrounding energy and the West. Using Wyoming--the largest energy provider in the United States--as a case study, students will consider the availability and viability of coal, oil, and gas (including coal-bed methane production and fracking), CO2 capture and storage, hydropower, and wind and solar energy. They will consider questions of the security of energy supply, global warming, environmental impacts, and economics and public policy, with particular attention to the so-called water-energy nexus, a critically important issue for Wyoming. nnStudents will spend the first week on campus, then travel to various field sites in Wyoming, including a coal mine, a CO2 capture plant, a CO2 enhanced oil recovery project, a wind power plant, a hydropower plant, and a shale-gas site. They will meet with relevant policy experts and public officials to consider such questions as: nn¿ Where our energy supplies come from and how energy is extracted from the ground and transported to urban centers where it is used;nn¿ The nexus between energy and water issues;nn¿ Tradeoffs and co-benefits between different types of energy supplies, including energy security, environmental impacts, and economic development; nn¿ Public policy issues surrounding energy, the environment, and the economy. nnDuring the trip, students will work on group projects to evaluate energy mix and will present their work at the conclusion of the course. Participants will return to Stanford on September 19. Travel to, from, and within Wyoming will be provided (except incidentals) and is made possible by the Bill Lane Center for the American West and Sophomore College.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENERGY 120: Fundamentals of Petroleum Engineering (ENGR 120)

Lectures, problems, field trip. Engineering topics in petroleum recovery; origin, discovery, and development of oil and gas. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of oil and natural gas. Material balance equations and reserve estimates using volumetric calculations. Gas laws. Single phase and multiphase flow through porous media.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 121: Fundamentals of Multiphase Flow (ENERGY 221)

Multiphase flow in porous media. Wettability, capillary pressure, imbibition and drainage, Leverett J-function, transition zone, vertical equilibrium. Relative permeabilities, Darcy's law for multiphase flow, fractional flow equation, effects of gravity, Buckley-Leverett theory, recovery predictions, volumetric linear scaling, JBN and Jones-Rozelle determination of relative permeability. Frontal advance equation, Buckley-Leverett equation as frontal advance solution, tracers in multiphase flow, adsorption, three-phase relative permeabilities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 123: When Technology Meets Reality; An In-depth Look at the Deepwater Horizon Blowout and Oil Spill

The Deepwater Horizon blowout and spill in April 2010 occurred on one of the most advanced deepwater drilling rigs in the world operated by one of the most experienced companies. In this course we will look at and discuss the technologies and management practices involved in deepwater drilling and discuss how an accident like this happens and what could have been done differently to avoid it. We will focus on the Horizon and also look briefly at other high profile industrial and technological accidents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sears, R. (PI)

ENERGY 141: Seismic Reservoir Characterization (ENERGY 241, GEOPHYS 241A)

(Same as GP241) Practical methods for quantitative characterization and uncertainty assessment of subsurface reservoir models integrating well-log and seismic data. Multidisciplinary combination of rock-physics, seismic attributes, sedimentological information and spatial statistical modeling techniques. Student teams build reservoir models using limited well data and seismic attributes typically available in practice, comparing alternative approaches. Software provided (SGEMS, Petrel, Matlab).nnRecommended: ERE240/260, or GP222/223, or GP260/262 or GES253/257; ERE246, GP112
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 171: Energy Infrastructure, Technology and Economics (ENERGY 271)

Oil and gas represents more than 50% of global primary energy. In delivering energy at scale, the industry has developed global infrastructure with supporting technology that gives it enormous advantages in energy markets; this course explores how the oil and gas industry operates. From the perspective of these established systems and technologies, we will look at the complexity of energy systems, and will consider how installed infrastructure enables technology development and deployment, impacts energy supply, and how existing infrastructure and capital invested in fossil energy impacts renewable energy development. Prerequisites: Energy 101 and 102 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 175: Well Test Analysis

Lectures, problems. Application of solutions of unsteady flow in porous media to transient pressure analysis of oil, gas, water, and geothermal wells. Pressure buildup analysis and drawdown. Design of well tests. Computer-aided interpretation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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