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1 - 10 of 88 results for: EESS

EESS 41N: The Global Warming Paradox (EARTHSYS 41N)

Preference to freshman. Focus is on the complex climate challenges posed by the substantial benefits of energy consumption, including the critical tension between the enormous global demand for increased human well-being and the negative climate consequences of large-scale emissions of carbon dioxide. Topics include: Earth¿s energy balance; detection and attribution of climate change; the climate response to enhanced greenhouse forcing; impacts of climate change on natural and human systems; and proposed methods for curbing further climate change. Sources include peer-reviewed scientific papers, current research results, and portrayal of scientific findings by the mass media and social networks.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EESS 46N: Exploring the Critical Interface between the Land and Monterey Bay: Elkhorn Slough (EARTHSYS 46N)

Preference to freshmen. Field trips to sites in the Elkhorn Slough, a small agriculturally impacted estuary that opens into Monterey Bay, a model ecosystem for understanding the complexity of estuaries, and one of California's last remaining coastal wetlands. Readings include Jane Caffrey's Changes in a California Estuary: A Profile of Elkhorn Slough. Basics of biogeochemistry, microbiology, oceanography, ecology, pollution, and environmental management.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EESS 57Q: Climate Change from the Past to the Future (EARTHSYS 57Q)

Preference to sophomores. Numeric models to predict how climate responds to increase of greenhouse gases. Paleoclimate during times in Earth's history when greenhouse gas concentrations were elevated with respect to current concentrations. Predicted scenarios of climate models and how these models compare to known hyperthermal events in Earth history. Interactions and feedbacks among biosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and lithosphere. Topics include long- and short-term carbon cycle, coupled biogeochemical cycles affected by and controlling climate change, and how the biosphere responds to climate change. Possible remediation strategies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EESS 61Q: Food and security (EARTHSYS 61Q, INTNLREL 61Q)

The course will provide a broad overview of key policy issues concerning agricultural development and food security, and will assess how global governance is addressing the problem of food security. At the same time the course will provide an overview of the field of international security, and examine how governments and international institutions are beginning to include food in discussions of security.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EESS 105: Food and Community: New Visions for a Sustainable Future (EARTHSYS 105)

Through this course students will learn about the community and outreach component of the urban gardening movement. Over the quarter students will learn about urban farming, about projects that work to increase access of the most underserved to fresh and local food, and about the challenges surrounding these efforts. The theme of the course will be stories- stories of food and community, of innovation, and of service. Students will learn through engaging in conversation with different leaders in the local food movement. Additionally, through hands-on learning and participation, students will become familiar with different types of community food projects in the Bay Area, including urban farms, free food giveaways, food banks, and gleaning projects. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Limited enrollment. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EESS 106: World Food Economy (EARTHSYS 106, ECON 106)

The interrelationships among food, populations, resources, and economic development. The role of agricultural and rural development in achieving economic and social progress in low-income nations. Emphasis is on public sector decision making as it relates to food policy.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EESS 111: Biology and Global Change (BIO 117, EARTHSYS 111)

The biological causes and consequences of anthropogenic and natural changes in the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Topics: glacial cycles and marine circulation, greenhouse gases and climate change, tropical deforestation and species extinctions, and human population growth and resource use. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core or graduate standing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EESS 112: Human Society and Environmental Change (EARTHSYS 112, HISTORY 103D)

Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding human-environment interactions with a focus on economics, policy, culture, history, and the role of the state. Prerequisite: ECON 1A
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EESS 117: Earth Sciences of the Hawaiian Islands (EARTHSCI 117, EARTHSYS 117)

Progression from volcanic processes through rock weathering and soil-ecosystem development to landscape evolution. The course starts with an investigation of volcanic processes, including the volcano structure, origin of magmas, physical-chemical factors of eruptions. Factors controlling rock weathering and soil development, including depth and nutrient levels impacting plant ecosystems, are explored next. Geomorphic processes of landscape evolution including erosion rates, tectonic/volcanic activity, and hillslope stability conclude the course. Methods for monitoring and predicting eruptions, defining spatial changes in landform, landform stability, soil production rates, and measuring biogeochemical processes are covered throughout the course. This course is restricted to students accepted into the Earth Systems of Hawaii Program.
Terms: alternate years, not given next year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EESS 118: Understanding Natural Hazards, Quantifying Risk, Increasing Resilience in Highly Urbanized Regions (EESS 218, GEOPHYS 118, GEOPHYS 218, GES 118, GES 218)

Integrating the science of natural hazards, methods for quantitatively estimating the risks that these hazards pose to populations and property, engineering solutions that might best ameliorate these risks and increase resilience to future events, and policy and economic decision-making studies that may increase long-term resilience to future events. Panel discussions by outside experts exploring the science, engineering, policy, and economics that underly the hazards, risks, and strategies for increasing resilience. Group assignments to evaluate the way in which natural hazards, and human population and developing interact in megacities to produce risk, and what strategies might be adopted in each area to reduce risks posted by the specific hazards faced by these urban areas.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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