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1 - 10 of 126 results for: COMM

COMM 1A: Media Technologies, People, and Society (COMM 211)

(Graduate students register for COMM 211.) Open to non-majors. Introduction to the concepts and contexts of communication. A topics-structured orientation emphasizing the field and the scholarly endeavors represented in the department.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 1B: Media, Culture, and Society (AMSTUD 1B)

The institutions and practices of mass media, including television, film, radio, and digital media, and their role in shaping culture and social life. The media's shifting relationships to politics, commerce, and identity.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 104W: Reporting, Writing, and Understanding the News

Techniques of news reporting and writing. The value and role of news in democratic societies. Gateway class to journalism. Prerequisite for all COMM 177/277 classes. Limited enrollment. Preference to sophomores and juniors.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 106: Communication Research Methods (COMM 206)

(Graduate students register for COMM 206.) Conceptual and practical concerns underlying commonly used quantitative approaches, including experimental, survey, content analysis, and field research in communication. Pre- or corequisite: STATS 60 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 108: Media Processes and Effects (COMM 208)

(Graduate students register for COMM 208.) The process of communication theory construction including a survey of social science paradigms and major theories of communication. Recommended: 1 or PSYCH 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 117: Digital Journalism (COMM 217)

(Graduate students register for COMM 217.) Seminar and practicum. The implications of new media for journalists. Professional and social issues related to the web as a case of new media deployment, as a story, as a research and reporting tool, and as a publishing channel. Prerequisite: Journalism M.A. student or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Brenner, R. (PI)

COMM 119S: Social Psychology of Large-Scale Media Interventions

As Internet use continues to increase around the globe, social and entertainment media are quickly becoming the preferred modes of communication among the new generation of learners. A growing body of literature suggests that leveraging the psychologically powerful elements of these new forms of media and relevant content can be an effective way to motivate positive behavior and attitude change. Theory-based examples of using media for positive change can be found in areas such as energy consumption, health maintenance, driving safety, and classroom performance. Many other potential applications of this approach have also been identified.nThrough a review of social psychology and media effects literature, this course will provide an introduction to the social science of new media and its potential to affect positive change on a large scale. The first half of the course will be spent exploring psychological processes and associated media effects research to equip students with a fundamental understanding of how humans process interactive media. The second half of the course will leverage this foundation to explore highly social new media and innovative applications of this technology for positive social change. The course will conclude with a group project and presentation that discusses the possibility of using new media to address critical issues in society. Along the way, we will compare different theoretical approaches to media psychology, varying concepts of what constitutes a psychological intervention, and how social media might be used to overcome weaknesses in historical social systems.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 120W: Digital Media in Society (AMSTUD 120, COMM 220)

(Graduate students register for 220.) Contemporary debates concerning the social and cultural impact of digital media. Topics include the historical origins of digital media, cultural contexts of their development and use, and influence of digital media on conceptions of self, community, and state. Priority to Juniors and Seniors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 122: Content Analysis: Studying Communication Artifacts (COMM 222)

An empirical and systematic investigation of documented messages in print, graphical, and audio-visual forms and observed human communication behaviors. Focuses on the design and execution of content analytic studies, including manifest vs. latent content, measurement issues, reliability and validity assessment, computer text analysis, and traditional human-coder techniques. Prerequisite: junior, senior or grad standing; COMM 106/206 or an equivalent course in basic social science research. Limited enrollment; preference to doctoral students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Voelker, D. (PI)

COMM 123: Argumentation and Persuasion (COMM 223)

We all know that appeals based on logic and sound evidence often fail where less rational appeals that "shouldn't" work, succeed. This course examines persuasion, the influencing of attitudes, beliefs or behavior, and locates within that broad subject argumentation, the process of reasoning methodically from evidence. Argumentation, the socially acceptable method of persuasion, typically confines itself to the rules of logic and has as its goal the recognition of states and causal relationships held by the arguer to objectively exist. Other methods of persuasion can succeed while flouting those rules, but only within limits, as the story of the Emperor's New Clothes reminds us. This course will explore whether those limits be accounted for by the capacity limitations and heuristics and biases of human information processing. Topics to be covered include evolutionary explanations; the central and peripheral routes to persuasion; source, channel and receiver factors; attitude-behavior consistency; the roles of involvement, elaboration, affect and social influence; critical thinking skills and logical fallacies. Limited enrollment; preference to juniors, seniors and graduate students, and within these, to Communication majors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Voelker, D. (PI)
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