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1 - 10 of 17 results for: URBANST ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

URBANST 101: Public Service Internship Preparation (ARTSINST 40, EARTHSYS 9, EDUC 9, HUMBIO 9, PUBLPOL 74)

Are you prepared for your internship this summer? This workshop series will help you make the most of your internship experience by setting learning goals in advance; negotiating and communicating clear roles and expectations; preparing for a professional role in a non-profit, government, or community setting; and reflecting with successful interns and community partners on how to prepare sufficiently ahead of time. You will read, discuss, and hear from guest speakers, as well as develop a learning plan specific to your summer or academic year internship placement. This course is primarily designed for students who have already identified an internship for summer or a later quarter. You are welcome to attend any and all workshops, but must attend the entire series and do the assignments for 1 unit of credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

URBANST 104: Civic Dreams, Human Spaces: Urban Design with People

Intensive two-week studio explores the principles underlying vibrant public spaces. Use observation and prototyping tools to inform the process of urban development. Decode public spaces from multiple perspectives: as sites of recreation, interaction, and political contention; as physical infrastructure that municipalities or grassroots citizen groups build and maintain for the common good; and as places with intangible qualities, such as historical memory, identity, and personal stories. In addition to on-campus meetings, this course requires immersive fieldwork in the City of San Francisco, including two weekend overnight stays and the opportunity to re-imagine the design and use of public spaces with local partners. Enrollment by application only. Find more info and apply at dschool.stanford.edu
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

URBANST 110: Utopia and Reality: Introduction to Urban Studies

Designed for freshmen and sophomores. Introduction to the study of cities and urban civilization focusing on the utopias that have been produced over time to guide and inspire city-dwellers to improve and perfect their urban environments. History of urbanization and the urban planning theories inspired by Ebenezer Howard, Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, the New Urbanists and Smart Growth advocates that address current issues such as urban community dynamics, suburbanization, sustainability, and globalization. Public policy approaches designed to address these issues and utopian visions of what cities could be, or should be, in the future. Topic of the final paper chosen by the student, with consent of instructor, and may be a historical research paper, a policy-advocacy paper, or a proposal for an urban utopia that addresses the challenges and possibilities of urban life today.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

URBANST 112: The Urban Underclass (SOC 149, SOC 249)

(Graduate students register for 249.) Recent research and theory on the urban underclass, including evidence on the concentration of African Americans in urban ghettos, and the debate surrounding the causes of poverty in urban settings. Ethnic/racial conflict, residential segregation, and changes in the family structure of the urban poor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 122: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 123B: Approaching Research in the Community: Design and Methods (CSRE 146B)

(Taught concurrently with CSRE 146; you may enroll in either course.) This course focuses on issues of research design and how to select specific methodological strategies to assure ethical and effective partnership-based research. In this course, students will plan for their own participation in a CB(P)R project. Topical themes will include best practice strategies for (a) defining and selecting community problems or issues to be addressed, (b) generating relevant and useful research questions, (c) choosing specific means and methods for data collection [e.g., surveys, interviews, focus groups, etc.], (d) storing, organizing and analyzing data, (e) reflecting on and critiquing research findings, and (f) carrying out dissemination in ways that can be expected to enhance community power and advance community development. Students will be provided with opportunities to workshop their respective projects-in-development, (e.g., developing and sharing research questions, data collection instruments, strategies for engaging community constituents as co-researchers, etc.). This is a required course for students participating in the Haas Center for Public Service¿s Community-based Research Fellows Program, but enrollment is open to all Stanford students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hurd, C. (PI)

URBANST 131: VIP: Very Impactful People - Social Innovation & the Social Entrepreneur

Invited lecture series. Perspectives and endeavors of entrepreneurs and thought leaders who address social needs in the U.S. and internationally through private, for-profit and nonprofit organizations or public institutions. The lecture and Q&A is from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., followed by an optional discussion period with the speaker including dinner.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Litvak, L. (PI)

URBANST 136: The Sharing Economy

The rapid growth of the sharing economy, sometimes also called the peer to peer economy, is made possible by the ubiquity of smart phones, inefficiency of ownership, and measures designed to create and measure trust among participants. The course will explore not only the rapid rise of certain companies but also the shadow side of commercialized relationships. We will examine the economics and development consequences of the sharing economy, primarily with an urban focus, along an emphasis on the design of platforms and markets, ownership, the nature of work, environmental degradation and inequality.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 170: Place-Making Policies (POLISCI 220, PUBLPOL 225)

This reading and research seminar considers the numerous ways that governments conduct social policy by shaping and remaking geographic places. Representative topics include: housing aid programs, exclusionary zoning, controls on internal migration and place of residence, cars and their place in cities, and the politics of western water projects. Students will conduct original field research on the consequences of these policies for economic, social, and political outcomes. Prerequisites: None.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Nall, C. (PI)

URBANST 182: Activating Urban Spaces (ARTSINST 182, CEE 131F)

This course will look at how public urban spaces are structured with a particular eye to the involvement of art and artists, whether formally or informally, in shaping the built and social environment of the city. Throughout the course particular focus will consider the possibilities for engaging social justice outcomes through spatial intervention drawing on examples from around the world. Interventions in urban spaces enact local change by making art the language of civic engagement; in this way a mural or performance or reconceptualized public space can become a method to address issues of locally prioritized inequality. We will use Stanford University and the Bay Area as our local research sites, making trips into the field to analyze methods, approaches, and experiences of urban spaces in action as well as bringing experts who work in related fields into the classroom. Sites of study include parks, public art, and street festivals by looking at arts organizations, city projects, community groups, and individual artists. The class will operate as a hybrid seminar and collaborative studio workspace which supports students in using ethnographic, visual, mapping, historical, and participatory methods in developing projects that respond to a particular site of their choosing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Taylor, J. (PI)
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