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1 - 10 of 66 results for: POLISCI

POLISCI 1: The Science of Politics

Why do countries go to war? How can we explain problems such as poverty, inequality, and pollution? What can be done to improve political representation in the United States and other countries? We will use scientific methods to answer these and other fundamental questions about politics.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 40SI: Rejecting Tyranny: Civil Resistance in Times of Crisis

Donald Trump's rise to power was anything but conventional. Although divisive among both Democrats and Republicans, he was still popular enough in the eyes of the electorate to become the leader of the free world. Is he a hero? Is he a dictator? Or something different altogether? As Trump often elicits comparisons to famous and infamous leaders of the past such as Hitler, Mussolini, and FDR, as well as right wing nationalists leaders in the present day such as Duterte and Le Pen, this class will examine the extent to which Trump's behavior resembles these authority figures and what our society should do to respond. Learning will be facilitated through discussion sections and guest professors from various Stanford departments including History, Political Science, and the Hoover Institution. Views from all sides of the political spectrum are welcome. Note: this class does not begin until the Tuesday of the second week of Spring quarter (Apr 11). Enrollment will be decided on the first day of class.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Diamond, L. (PI)

POLISCI 43Q: Immigration Crisis? Policy Dilemmas in the US and Europe

Immigration is a hotly contested social, economic, and political phenomenon in countries throughout the world. People migrate for many reasons, including the desire to start careers, reunite families, and escape oppression. While each story of migration is unique, migration in the modern world has certain commonalities, and these patterns often manifest as political conflict. Labor migration promises economic productivity and efficiency but may threaten existing labor protections and social welfare guarantees to natives. Facilitating migration from failed nation-states may protect the human rights of migrants but introduce security concerns. In the 21st century, the world has witnessed political violence¿by natives and migrants, both first and second generations¿including the September 11th attacks, the London bombings, the mass killings in Norway, and the Paris attacks. How can policymakers harness the promises of immigration without succumbing to its pitfalls? Why do some countries r more »
Immigration is a hotly contested social, economic, and political phenomenon in countries throughout the world. People migrate for many reasons, including the desire to start careers, reunite families, and escape oppression. While each story of migration is unique, migration in the modern world has certain commonalities, and these patterns often manifest as political conflict. Labor migration promises economic productivity and efficiency but may threaten existing labor protections and social welfare guarantees to natives. Facilitating migration from failed nation-states may protect the human rights of migrants but introduce security concerns. In the 21st century, the world has witnessed political violence¿by natives and migrants, both first and second generations¿including the September 11th attacks, the London bombings, the mass killings in Norway, and the Paris attacks. How can policymakers harness the promises of immigration without succumbing to its pitfalls? Why do some countries respond so differently than others in similar circumstances? When does the meaning of citizenship evolve and when does it stay the same? What lessons do other countries have for the United States as it considers immigration reform? n n This course is designed to provide students with an overview of immigration law and politics in the United States and other countries, particularly in the European Union. Students will develop the necessary tools to critically analyze immigration policies, starting with the historical evolution of immigration policy in the United States. We will visit Angel Island and discuss the legacy of the Chinese Exclusion Act as well as contemporary immigration politics in San Francisco, a so-called ¿sanctuary city¿ for undocumented immigrants. There will also be a screening on La Haine (Hate), an acclaimed French film which chronicles the challenges of immigrant integration. Students will study the economics of immigration and the politics of refugees in the context of post-9/11 security dilemmas. Students will design a concrete immigration policy proposal.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Mohanty, P. (PI)

POLISCI 71: Current Issues in European Security

Russia's annexation of Crimea in Spring 2014 posed not only a threat to post-World War II Europe formed around the norm of national sovereignty, but possibly also the very real threat that Russia had awakened from its 20 years of peacefulness to once again impose its will on Eastern Europe. Is Europe again under threat from the East? In Current Issues in European Security, students will attend public events organized by Stanford's Europe Center and Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. These events -- talks by political leaders and scholars from the U.S. and Europe -- will engage and encourage students to understand the deepening crises in Ukraine, conflict in the Baltics, and European security as a whole. Students will leave the course with a better understanding of the multi-faceted dilemmas policy makers face, historical background, and possible paths forward for global decision makers. In addition to attending the events, students will write a final memo recommending a course of action for US policy makers. Events will typically be scheduled from 12 noon to 1:30 p.m. but may be held at other times. There will be approximately six events in spring quarter, and students may also be required to attend one or two separate discussion sessions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: McFaul, M. (PI)

POLISCI 73: Energy Policy in California (CEE 263G, PUBLPOL 73)

This seminar will provide an in-depth analysis of the role of California state agencies in driving energy policy development, technology innovation, and market structures. The course will cover three areas: 1) roles and responsibilities of key state agencies; 2) current and evolving energy and climate policies; and 3) development of California's 21st century energy systems. Presentations will include experts from the California Energy Commission, the California Public Utilities Commission, the California Air Resources Board, the California Independent System Operator, the California Legislature, and the Governor's office. This class is required for all Stanford Energy internships in California (SEIC) fellowship awardees and is open to other interested undergraduate and graduate students. May be repeated for credit. Class dates are: April 22 (10am-2pm); May 13 (10am-1pm); June 3 (10am-1pm). Interested students please contact Jon Lo at cyjlo@stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 104: Introduction to Comparative Politics

(Formerly POLISCI 4) Why are some countries prone to civil war and violence, while others remain peaceful? Why do some countries maintain democratic systems, while others do not? Why are some countries more prosperous than others? This course will provide an overview of the most basic questions in the comparative study of political systems, and will introduce the analytical tools that can help us answer them.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 115E: Japan & the World: Innovation, Economic Growth, Globalization, and Int'l Security Challenges (EASTASN 153, EASTASN 253, ECON 120)

This course introduces students to the economy, politics, and international relations of contemporary Japan. The course puts a particular emphasis on several emerging issues in Japan including innovation and economic dynamism, Japan's contributions to international peace and cooperation, and Japan's response to international economic and geopolitical challenges. The course will invite several guest instructors, each of whom is an expert on at least one of the issues that Japan faces today, to give lectures in addition to the main instructors. The guest lecturers will also be available outside of the classroom for further discussion during their stays at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 116: The International History of Nuclear Weapons (HISTORY 103E)

An introduction to the history of nuclear weapons from World War II to the present. The focus is on politics, but the role of technology transfer, whether legal or illicit, in the development of nuclear weapons will be examined; so too will the theories about the military and political utility of nuclear weapons. We will look at the efforts to control and abolish nuclear weapons and at the international institutions created to reduce the danger of nuclear war.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 120C: American Political Institutions in Uncertain Times (PUBLPOL 124)

This course examines how the rules that govern elections and the policy process determine political outcomes. It explores the historical forces that have shaped American political institutions, contemporary challenges to governing, and prospects for change. Topics covered include partisan polarization and legislative gridlock, the politicization of the courts, electoral institutions and voting rights, the expansion of presidential power, campaign finance and lobbying, representational biases among elected officials, and the role of political institutions in maintaining the rule of law. Throughout, emphasis will be placed on the strategic interactions between Congress, the presidency, and the courts and the importance of informal norms and political culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 124A: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ARTHIST 152, ENGLISH 124, HISTORY 151)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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