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1 - 10 of 38 results for: ARTSTUDI

ARTSTUDI 136: The Portable Studio

Using the concept behind the Post-Studio art practice as a starting point, this course will explore what it means to make art outside (in a landscape/cityscape, etc.) instead of inside the traditional Art Studio. With technology and equipment getting smaller and more handy and with the endless stream of apps and functions available on cell phones and other mobile devices, this course will furthermore investigate how this gives the artist the ability to work on the fly and produce most of their artwork on site. Given the interdisciplinary nature of this course, the students will be given 3 assignments throughout this course, where they will be introduced to sound, video, photography, and performance art. The goal of this course is to challenge the students to think differently about the use of their mobile devices and tablets and to be creative and experimental on the spot.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lynnerup, M. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 140: Drawing I

Functional anatomy and perspective as they apply to problems of drawing the form in space. Individual and group instruction as students work from still life set-ups, nature, and the model. Emphasis is on the development of critical skills and perceptual drawing techniques for those with little or no previous experience with pastels, inks, charcoal, conte, and pencil. Lectures alternate with studio work. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 141: Plein Air Painting Now

Surrounded by so many technologies for image production, why choose to take a course based on a style of painting developed over a hundred years ago? The standard answer to this question has changed remarkably little. Rather than answering that the camera cannot capture what the eye sees, we might instead respond that neither the computer, nor the camera, nor video, can reproduce in paint the subjective gaze of the contemporary viewer. Contained within this answer lies the trajectory for the class "PLEIN AIR PAINTING NOW!"nnIn this course students will be introduced to various water based media appropriate for plein air painting and learn various techniques and strategies for making paintings outdoors. The course will include the traditional discussions of brushes, paints, the different types of supports as well as easels, umbrellas and chairs. A broad variety of painting techniques will be demonstrated. We will set up in various locations around campus, paying particular attention to more »
Surrounded by so many technologies for image production, why choose to take a course based on a style of painting developed over a hundred years ago? The standard answer to this question has changed remarkably little. Rather than answering that the camera cannot capture what the eye sees, we might instead respond that neither the computer, nor the camera, nor video, can reproduce in paint the subjective gaze of the contemporary viewer. Contained within this answer lies the trajectory for the class "PLEIN AIR PAINTING NOW!"nnIn this course students will be introduced to various water based media appropriate for plein air painting and learn various techniques and strategies for making paintings outdoors. The course will include the traditional discussions of brushes, paints, the different types of supports as well as easels, umbrellas and chairs. A broad variety of painting techniques will be demonstrated. We will set up in various locations around campus, paying particular attention to the specifics of the siteas this will serve as the jumping off point for discussion of the readings that form the second component of the class.nnPlease note that this class takes place outdoors. Plan accordingly, as we will be meeting in various locations around campus, and will be subject to inclement weather.Freshmen and Sophomores receive priority for enrollment. This is a designated CREATIVE EXPRESSIONS course.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Deas, Y. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 143: Screen Print

TBA
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Bloch, B. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 145: Painting I

Introduction to techniques, materials, and vocabulary in oil painting. Still life, landscape, and figure used as subject matter. Emphasis is on painting and drawing from life. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 147: Art Book Object

Explores contemporary aesthetic interpretations of the book as an art object while invigorating traditional artistic practices of the art of the book. Through the medium of drawing, collage, and mixed media students produce their own artist's book. The course familiarizes students with bookbinding and the various techniques used, as well as exploring the narrative, text and image, and the book as a sculptural object.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wight, G. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 150Q: Queer Sculpture

This hands on studio based course explores, queering art practices is also about the strategic effort to appropriate and subvert the meanings, aims, and experiences of conventional art practices, tactics that may involve everything from shifts in the content of a work and its targeted audience to the methods by which it is produced and its formal properties. The political imperatives of a queer or queered position will shape thematic investigations of practices related to activism, failure, abstraction, mining the archive, camp, and drag. David Halperin defines queer as ¿whatever is at odds with the normal, the legitimate, the dominant. There is nothing in particular to which it necessarily refers. It is an identity without an essence.¿ Classes will require reading, thinking, discussing, and making. Students will produce artwork for critiques and participate in discussions of the readings. Guest artists and fieldtrips. n nArtists that will be covered in the course include Nao Bustamante, Cassils, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Keith Haring, Derek Jarman, Isaac Julien, Zoe Leonard, Catherine Opie, Marlon Riggs, Emily Roysdon, and David Wojnarowicz as well as theorists Sarah Ahmed and Jose Esteban Munoz.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Berlier, T. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 151: Sculpture I

Traditional and non-traditional approaches to sculpture production through working with materials including wood, metal, and plaster. Conceptual and technical skills, and safe and appropriate use of tools and materials. Impact of material and technique upon form and content; the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Historical and contemporary forming methods provide a theoretical basis for studio work. Field trips; guest lecturers.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 155: Social Sculpture

This course investigates the immediacy of the body as material and sculpture in order to investigate private and social spaces. Actions are often used to understand or question the function and psychological aspects of a space and are documented for the perpetuation of these ideas. Throughout the quarter we will investigate the body as material and develop site specific performances enacted for: Private/Domestic and Public Space; Constructed Space & Physical Space; ecological systems; and generate both Individual & Collaborative based Actions, Interventions, & Events."
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTSTUDI 160: Intro to Digital / Physical Design

Contemporary production processes ¿ both manufacturing and media processes ¿ often span the digital and the physical. 3D Depth cameras can scan real world models or movements, which can be manipulated or adjusted digitally, then re-output to the physical world via a myriad of 2D and 3D printing and laser cutting technologies. Crowd sourced information is uploaded to social media, which in turn guides our physical meeting places. Google street-view maps our physical world, and augmented reality displays overlay it. How as artists or designers to we grapple with and use this digital / physical permeability to create new experiences and meaning for our current time? This introductory studio course explores various tool sets as well as artists working across these genres. This course is a good baseline exploration for anyone interested in designing or making art with emerging contemporary tools.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Odell, J. (PI)
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