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411 - 420 of 451 results for: all courses

SOC 138: American Indians in Comparative Historical Perspective (NATIVEAM 138, SOC 238)

(Graduate students register for 238.) Demographic, political, and economic processes and events that shaped relations between Euro-Americans and American Indians, 1600-1890. How the intersection of these processes affected the outcome of conflicts between these two groups, and how this conflict was decisive in determining the social position of American Indians in the late 19th century and the evolution of the doctrine of tribal sovereignty.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 139: American Indians in Contemporary Society (NATIVEAM 139, SOC 239)

(Graduate students register for 239.) The social position of American Indians in contemporary American society, 1890 to the present. The demographic resurgence of American Indians, changes in social and economic status, ethnic identification and political mobilization, and institutions such as tribal governments and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Recommended: 138 or a course in American history.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 140: Introduction to Social Stratification (SOC 240)

(Graduate students register for 240.) The main classical and modern explanations of the causes of social, economic, and political inequality. Issues include: power; processes that create and maintain inequality; the central axes of inequality in contemporary societies (race, ethnicity, class, and gender); the consequences of inequality for individuals and groups; and how social policy can mitigate and exacerbate inequality. Cases include technologically simple groups, the Indian caste system, and the modern U.S.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 141: Controversies about Inequality (SOC 241)

(Graduate students register for 241.) Debate format involving Stanford and guest faculty. Forms of inequality including racial, ethnic, and gender stratification; possible policy interventions. Topics such as welfare reform, immigration policy, affirmative action, discrimination in labor markets, sources of income inequality, the duty of rich nations to help poor nations, and causes of gender inequality.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 145: Race and Ethnic Relations in the USA (CSRE 145, SOC 245)

(Graduate students register for 245.) Race and ethnic relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. The processes that render ethnic and racial boundary markers, such as skin color, language, and culture, salient in interaction situations. Why only some groups become targets of ethnic attacks. The social dynamics of ethnic hostility and ethnic/racial protest movements.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 146: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, ENGLISH 172D, PSYCH 155, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 148: Comparative Ethnic Conflict (CSRE 148, SOC 248)

Causes and consequences of racial and ethnic conflict, including nationalist movements, ethnic genocide, civil war, ethnic separatism, politics, indigenous peoples' movements, and minority rights movements around the world.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 149: The Urban Underclass (CSRE 149A, SOC 249, URBANST 112)

(Graduate students register for 249.) Recent research and theory on the urban underclass, including evidence on the concentration of African Americans in urban ghettos, and the debate surrounding the causes of poverty in urban settings. Ethnic/racial conflict, residential segregation, and changes in the family structure of the urban poor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 150: Race and Political Sociology (CSRE 150, SOC 250)

How race informs the theories and research within political sociology. The state's role in creation and maintenance of racial categories, the ways in which racial identity motivates political actors, how race is used to legitimate policy decisions, comparisons across racial groups. Emphasis on understanding the ways race operates in the political arena.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 152: The Social Determinants of Health (SOC 252)

Our social and physical environments are widely recognized as playing a central role in shaping patterns of health and disease within and across populations. Across disciplines, a key question has been: How does the social environment ¿gets under the skin to influence health? In this course, we will explore how social scientists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and physicians tackle this question. Reflecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches, we will draw on literatures in social science, public health, and medicine to understand the processes through which our environments shape health outcomes. We will examine a number of key social determinants of health, wellness and illness. These determinants include socioeconomic status, gender. race/ethnicity, religious affiliation, neighborhoods, environments, social relationships, and health care. We will also discuss a host of mechanisms through which these factors are hypothesized to influence health, such as stress, life more »
Our social and physical environments are widely recognized as playing a central role in shaping patterns of health and disease within and across populations. Across disciplines, a key question has been: How does the social environment ¿gets under the skin to influence health? In this course, we will explore how social scientists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and physicians tackle this question. Reflecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches, we will draw on literatures in social science, public health, and medicine to understand the processes through which our environments shape health outcomes. We will examine a number of key social determinants of health, wellness and illness. These determinants include socioeconomic status, gender. race/ethnicity, religious affiliation, neighborhoods, environments, social relationships, and health care. We will also discuss a host of mechanisms through which these factors are hypothesized to influence health, such as stress, lifestyle, and access to health resources. An overall theme will be how contextual factors that adversely affect health are inequitably distributed and thereby fuel health disparities. Through all of this, we will assess the promise of public policy, planning and research for generating more equitable health outcomes across society.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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