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251 - 260 of 448 results for: all courses

LINGUIST 1: Introduction to Linguistics

This course introduces students to the cognitive organization of linguistic structure and the social nature of language use. We will investigate language as it is used in our everyday lives, highlighting both the variability and systematic nature of all levels of linguistic structure. In doing so, we will discover how to approach language from a scientific perspective, learn the fundamentals of linguistic analysis, and understand the foundational concepts of the field of Linguistics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 5N: What's Your Accent? Investigations in Acoustic Phonetics

Preference to freshmen. Phonetic variation across accents of English; experimental design; practical experience examining accents of seminar participants; acoustic analysis of speech using Praat.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 35: Minds and Machines (PHIL 99, PSYCH 35, SYMSYS 1)

(Formerly SYMSYS 100). An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Undergraduates considering a major in symbolic systems should take this course as early as possible in their program of study.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 44N: Living with Two Languages

Preference to freshmen. The nature of bi- and multilingualism with emphasis on the social and educational effects in the U.S. and worldwide, in individual versus society, and in child and adult. The social, cognitive, psycholinguistic, and neurological consequences of bilingualism. Participation in planning and carrying out a research project in language use and bilingualism.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 47N: Languages, Dialects, Speakers

Preference to freshmen. Variation and change in languages from around the world; language and thought; variation in sound patterns and grammatical structures; linguistic and social structures of variation; how languages differ from one another and how issues in linguistics connect to other social and cultural issues; the systematic study of language.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

LINGUIST 65: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21, CSRE 21)

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the ¿Living Arts¿ of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).nUNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular ¿AAVE Happenin¿ at the end of the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 83N: Translation

Preference to Freshman. What is a translation? The increased need for translations in the modern world due to factors such as tourism and terrorism, localization and globalization, diplomacy and treaties, law and religion, and literature and science. How to meet this need; different kinds of translation for different purposes; what makes one translation better than another; why some texts are more difficult to translate than others. Can some of this work be done by machines? Are there things that cannot be said in some languages?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kay, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 105: Phonetics (LINGUIST 205A)

Phonetics is the systematic study of speech. In this class, we will learn about the physical gestures and timing involved in the articulation of spoken language and about the resulting acoustic signal that is decoded into linguistic units by the human auditory system. The class is structured into two parts: A practical lab component, and a class component. This course highlights both the complexity of the physical nature of producing spoken language, and the highly variable acoustic signal that is interpreted by listeners as language. By the end of this course, you should: (1) Understand the process of preparing an utterance to articulating it; (2) Understand the basic acoustic properties of speech; (3) Provide detailed phonetic transcriptions of speech; (4) Produce and understand the gestures involved in nearly all of the world's speech sounds, and (5) Understand the ways this knowledge can be used to advance our understanding of spoken language understanding by humans and machines.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 110: Introduction to Phonology

Introduction to the sound systems of the world's languages, their similarities and differences. Theories that account for the tacit generalizations that govern the sound patterns of languages.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 120: Introduction to Syntax

Grammatical constructions, primarily English, and their consequences for a general theory of language. Practical experience in forming and testing linguistic hypotheses, reading, and constructing rules.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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