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241 - 250 of 432 results for: all courses

INTNLREL 110C: America and the World Economy (POLISCI 110C, POLISCI 110X)

Examination of contemporary US foreign economic policy. Areas studied: the changing role of the dollar; mechanism of international monetary management; recent crises in world markets including those in Europe and Asia; role of IMF, World Bank and WTO in stabilizing world economy; trade politics and policies; the effects of the globalization of business on future US prosperity. Enroll in PoliSci 110C for WIM credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

INTNLREL 110D: War and Peace in American Foreign Policy (AMSTUD 110D, POLISCI 110D, POLISCI 110Y)

(Students not taking this course for WIM, register for 110Y.) The causes of war in American foreign policy. Issues: international and domestic sources of war and peace; war and the American political system; war, intervention, and peace making in the post-Cold War period.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

INTNLREL 114D: Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (IPS 230, POLISCI 114D, POLISCI 314D)

Links among the establishment of democracy, economic growth, and the rule of law. How democratic, economically developed states arise. How the rule of law can be established where it has been historically absent. Variations in how such systems function and the consequences of institutional forms and choices. How democratic systems have arisen in different parts of the world. Available policy instruments used in international democracy, rule of law, and development promotion efforts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 197: Points in Japanese Grammar (JAPAN 297)

(Formerly JAPANLIT157/257) The course provides practical but in-depth analyses of selected points in Japanese grammar that are often difficult to acquire within the limited hours of language courses. We consider findings from linguistic research, focusing on differences between similar expressions and distinctions that may not be salient in English, with the aim to provide systematic analytical background for more advanced understanding of the language. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG23 or equivalent for JAPAN197; JAPANLNG103 or equivalent for JAPAN297.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JEWISHST 4N: A World History of Genocide (HISTORY 4N)

Reviews the history of genocide from ancient times until the present. Defines genocide, both in legal and historical terms, and investigates its causes, consequences, and global dimensions. Issues of prevention, punishment, and interdiction. Main periods of concern are the ancient world, Spanish colonial conquest; early modern Asia; settler genocides in America, Australia, and Africa; the Armenian genocide and the Holocaust; genocide in communist societies; and late 20th century genocide.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JEWISHST 282: Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II (HISTORY 228, HISTORY 328, JEWISHST 382)

Looks at the experience and representation of Poland's wartime history from the Nazi-Soviet Pact (1939) to the aftermath of Yalta (1945). Examines Nazi and Soviet ideology and practice in Poland, as well as the ways Poles responded, resisted, and survived. Considers wartime relations among Polish citizens, particularly Poles and Jews. In this regard, interrogates the traditional self-characterization of Poles as innocent victims, looking at their relationship to the Holocaust, thus engaging in a passionate debate still raging in Polish society.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

LINGUIST 1: Introduction to Linguistics

This course introduces students to the cognitive organization of linguistic structure and the social nature of language use. We will investigate language as it is used in our everyday lives, highlighting both the variability and systematic nature of all levels of linguistic structure. In doing so, we will discover how to approach language from a scientific perspective, learn the fundamentals of linguistic analysis, and understand the foundational concepts of the field of Linguistics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 5N: What's Your Accent? Investigations in Acoustic Phonetics

Preference to freshmen. Phonetic variation across accents of English; experimental design; practical experience examining accents of seminar participants; acoustic analysis of speech using Praat.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2011 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 35: Minds and Machines (PHIL 99, PSYCH 35, SYMSYS 1)

(Formerly SYMSYS 100). An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Undergraduates considering a major in symbolic systems should take this course as early as possible in their program of study.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 44N: Living with Two Languages

Preference to freshmen. The nature of bi- and multilingualism with emphasis on the social and educational effects in the U.S. and worldwide, in individual versus society, and in child and adult. The social, cognitive, psycholinguistic, and neurological consequences of bilingualism. Participation in planning and carrying out a research project in language use and bilingualism.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2014 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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