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201 - 210 of 432 results for: all courses

HISTORY 195C: Modern Japanese History: From Samurai to Pokemon

(Same as HISTORY 95C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 195C.) Japan's modern transformation from the late 19th century to the present. Topics include: the Meiji revolution; industrialization and social dislocation; the rise of democracy and empire; total war and US occupation; economic miracle and malaise; Japan as soft power; and politics of memory. Readings and films focus on the lived experience of ordinary men and women across social classes and regions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 198: The History of Modern China

(Same as HISTORY 98. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 198.) Do you want to understand Modern China? If so, this course is for you. And even if you've studied China before, or grew up there, this course will deepen and challenge your perspectives. Through vivid and propulsive lectures - drawing on fiction, film, political essays, and more - Professor Tom Mullaney will chart out China¿s historical transformations from 1800 to today, equipping you to speak and write intelligently about Chinese politics, society, economy, culture, gender, ethnicity, and international affairs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 201: From Confederate Monuments to Wikipedia: The Politics of Remembering the Past (AFRICAAM 102, CSRE 201)

Gateway course for Public History/Public Service track. Examines various ways history is used outside of the classroom, and its role in political/cultural debates in the U.S. and abroad. Showcases issues and careers in public history with guest speakers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 202G: Peoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War (HISTORY 302G)

Clausewitz conceptualized war as always consisting of a trinity of passion, chance, and reason, mirrored, respectively, in the people, army and government. Following Clausewitz, this course examines the peoples, armies, and governments that shaped World War II. Analyzes the ideological, political, diplomatic and economic motivations and constraints of the belligerents and their resulting strategies, military planning and fighting. Explores the new realities of everyday life on the home fronts and the experiences of non-combatants during the war, the final destruction of National Socialist Germany and Imperial Japan, and the emerging conflict between the victors. How the peoples, armies and governments involved perceived their possibilities and choices as a means to understand the origins, events, dynamics and implications of the greatest war in history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 208A: Science and Law in History (HISTORY 308A)

How the intertwined modern fields of science and law, since the early modern period, together developed central notions of fact, evidence, experiment, demonstration, objectivity, and proof.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 208S: Facing the Past: The Politics of Retrospective Justice

Forms of injustice in history including slavery, genocide, ethnic cleansing, mass rape, forced religious conversion, and torture of prisoners. Mechanisms developed over the last century to define, deter, and alleviate the effects of such offenses, including war crimes tribunals, truth commissions, national apologies, and monetary reparations. Case studies chart the international field of retrospective justice, exploring the legal, political, and moral implications of confronting traumatic pasts.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2010 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 221B: The 'Woman Question' in Modern Russia (FEMGEN 221B)

Russian radicals believed that the status of women provided the measure of freedom in a society and argued for the extension of rights to women as a basic principle of social progress. The social status and cultural representations of Russian women from the mid-19th century to the present. The arguments and actions of those who fought for women's emancipation in the 19th century, theories and policies of the Bolsheviks, and the reality of women's lives under them. How the status of women today reflects on the measure of freedom in post-Communist Russia.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 224A: The Soviet Civilization (HISTORY 424A, REES 224A)

Socialist visions and practices of the organization of society and messianic politics; the Soviet understanding of mass violence, political and ethnic; and living space. Primary and secondary sources. Research paper or historiographical essay.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 228: Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II (HISTORY 328, JEWISHST 282, JEWISHST 382)

Looks at the experience and representation of Poland's wartime history from the Nazi-Soviet Pact (1939) to the aftermath of Yalta (1945). Examines Nazi and Soviet ideology and practice in Poland, as well as the ways Poles responded, resisted, and survived. Considers wartime relations among Polish citizens, particularly Poles and Jews. In this regard, interrogates the traditional self-characterization of Poles as innocent victims, looking at their relationship to the Holocaust, thus engaging in a passionate debate still raging in Polish society.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 239H: Colonialism and Empire in Modern Europe

To better understand the history of modern Europe within a global context, explores the following questions: What impact did more than a century of colonialism have on the social lives, cultural attitudes, political loyalties, and intellectual world views of European women and men during the nineteenth century? What accounts for the resiliency of empire during a period of rapid global change that witnessed the rise of modern democracy, economic liberalism, ethnic nationalism, and international socialism?
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2010 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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