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141 - 150 of 457 results for: all courses

EDUC 110: Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools (EDUC 310, SOC 132, SOC 332)

Seminar. Key sociological theories and empirical studies of the links between education and its role in modern society, focusing on frameworks that deal with sources of educational change, the organizational context of schooling, the impact of schooling on social stratification, and the relationships between the educational system and other social institutions such as families, neighborhoods, and the economy.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 112: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 212, SOC 129X, SOC 229X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ball, A. (PI)

EDUC 115N: How to Learn Mathematics

What is going on in mathematics education in the United States? Why do so many people hate and fear math? What contributes to the high levels of innumeracy in the general population? Why do girls and women opt out of math when they get a chance? In this seminar we will consider seminal research on math learning in K-12 classrooms, including a focus on equity. We will spend time investigating cases of teaching and learning, through watching videos and visiting schools. This seminar is for those who are interested in education, and who would like to learn about ways to help students (and maybe yourselves?) learn and enjoy mathematics. If you have had bad math experiences and would like to understand them ¿ and put them behind you ¿ this seminar will be particularly good for you. The final project for this class will involve developing a case of one or more math learners, investigating their journeys in the world of math.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 120C: Education and Society (EDUC 220C, SOC 130, SOC 230)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ramirez, F. (PI)

EDUC 136: World, Societal, and Educational Change: Comparative Perspectives (EDUC 306D, SOC 231)

Theoretical perspectives and empirical studies on the structural and cultural sources of educational expansion and differentiation, and on the cultural and structural consequences of educational institutionalization. Research topics: education and nation building; education, mobility, and equality; education, international organizations, and world culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ramirez, F. (PI)

ENGLISH 172D: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, PSYCH 155, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 130: Science, Technology, and Contemporary Society

Key social, cultural, and values issues raised by contemporary scientific and technological developments; distinctive features of science and engineering as sociotechnical activities; major influences of scientific and technological developments on 20th-century society, including transformations and problems of work, leisure, human values, the fine arts, and international relations; ethical conflicts in scientific and engineering practice; and the social shaping and management of contemporary science and technology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 145: Technology Entrepreneurship

How do you create a successful start-up? What is entrepreneurial leadership in a large firm? What are the differences between an idea and true opportunity? How does an entrepreneur form a team and gather the resources necessary to create a great enterprise? Mentor-guided project focused on developing students' startup ideas, immersion in nuances of innovation and early stage entrepreneurship, case studies, research on the entrepreneurial process, and the opportunity to network with Silicon Valley's top entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. For undergraduates of all majors who seek to understand the formation and growth of high-impact start-ups in areas such as information, energy, medical and consumer technologies. No prerequisites. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 159Q: Japanese Companies and Japanese Society (MATSCI 159Q)

Preference to sophomores. The structure of a Japanese company from the point of view of Japanese society. Visiting researchers from Japanese companies give presentations on their research enterprise. The Japanese research ethic. The home campus equivalent of a Kyoto SCTI course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Sinclair, R. (PI)

ESS 163: Demography and Life History Theory (ESS 363)

Life history theory is the branch of evolutionary biology that attempts to understand patterns of investment in growth, reproduction, and survival across the life cycle. It is the theory that explains the major transitions that mark individual organisms' life cycles from conception to death. In this class, we will focus on the central themes of life history theory and how they relate to specific problems of the human life cycle. In addition to the classic questions of life history theory (e.g., evolution of reproductive effort, size vs. quality, etc.), we will discuss some peculiar issues that relate specifically to humans. In particular, we will explore the intersection of life history theory and more classical economic approaches to decision theory and rational choice. This will include an exploration of the evolution of economic transfers and their implications for demographic transitions, ecological resilience, and the consumption of natural resources. This discussion will explore how an understanding of life history theory might help in promoting investments in future welfare or developing policies that promote sustainability.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jones, J. (PI)
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