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71 - 80 of 311 results for: CSI::certificate ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

DESINST 423: Design for Healthy Behavior Change

In the U.S., 75% of medical expenditures are for illnesses that are predominantly lifestyle related such as type 2 diabetes, arthritis and heart disease. It has been shown as people modify their lifestyles with healthier habits, medical problems can be reduced or avoided and a healthier and happier life achieved. The class employs design thinking in teams while working directly with volunteers in the community to help them achieve their health goals. There is an individual project and a team project each with multiple milestones. Learn and experience the design thinking process through interactions and design working within student teams and working directly with patient-volunteers from the practice of Drs. Ann Lindsay and Alan Glaseroff from the Stanford Coordinated Care Clinic. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 102: Fundamentals of Renewable Power (ENERGY 102)

Do you want a much better understanding of renewable power technologies? Did you know that wind and solar are the fastest growing forms of electricity generation? Are you interested in hearing about the most recent, and future, designs for green power? Do you want to understand what limits power extraction from renewable resources and how current designs could be improved? This course dives deep into these and related issues for wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, tidal and wave power technologies. We welcome all student, from non-majors to MBAs and grad students. If you are potentially interested in an energy or environmental related major, this course is particularly useful. Recommended: Math 21 or 42.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 103: Understanding Energy (CEE 107A, CEE 207A)

Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storag more »
Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change, sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD based on student schedules). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Ginnebaugh. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ Course was formerly called Energy Resources.nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107S.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 160: Sustainable Cities (URBANST 164)

Service-learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. Focus will be on the relationship of land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in team-based projects in collaboration with local community partners and take part in significant off-site fieldwork. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Chan, D. (PI)

EARTHSYS 180: Principles and Practices of Sustainable Agriculture (ESS 280)

Field-based training in ecologically sound agricultural practices at the Stanford Community Farm. Weekly lessons, field work, and group projects. Field trips to educational farms in the area. Topics include: soils, composting, irrigation techniques, IPM, basic plant anatomy and physiology, weeds, greenhouse management, and marketing. Application required. Deadline: March 14 nnApplication: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bdBA34jEZxifdjf
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EASTASN 153: Japan & the World: Innovation, Economic Growth, Globalization, and Int'l Security Challenges (EASTASN 253, ECON 120, POLISCI 115E)

This course introduces students to the economy, politics, and international relations of contemporary Japan. The course puts a particular emphasis on several emerging issues in Japan including innovation and economic dynamism, Japan's contributions to international peace and cooperation, and Japan's response to international economic and geopolitical challenges. The course will invite several guest instructors, each of whom is an expert on at least one of the issues that Japan faces today, to give lectures in addition to the main instructors. The guest lecturers will also be available outside of the classroom for further discussion during their stays at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EASTASN 162: Seminar on the Evolution of the Modern Chinese State, 1550-Present (EASTASN 262)

This seminar will assess the evolving response of the late imperial, early Republican, Nanjing Republic, and the PRC regimes in response to China's changing international setting, to successive revolutions in warfare, and to fundamental economic, social and demographic trends domestically from the 16th century to present. It will assess the capacities of each successive Chinese state to extract resources from society and economy and to mobilize people behind national purposes, to elaborate centralized institutions to pursue national priorities, to marshal military forces for national defense and police forces to sustain domestic order, and to generate popular identities loyal to national authority.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Miller, A. (PI)

EASTASN 253: Japan & the World: Innovation, Economic Growth, Globalization, and Int'l Security Challenges (EASTASN 153, ECON 120, POLISCI 115E)

This course introduces students to the economy, politics, and international relations of contemporary Japan. The course puts a particular emphasis on several emerging issues in Japan including innovation and economic dynamism, Japan's contributions to international peace and cooperation, and Japan's response to international economic and geopolitical challenges. The course will invite several guest instructors, each of whom is an expert on at least one of the issues that Japan faces today, to give lectures in addition to the main instructors. The guest lecturers will also be available outside of the classroom for further discussion during their stays at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EASTASN 262: Seminar on the Evolution of the Modern Chinese State, 1550-Present (EASTASN 162)

This seminar will assess the evolving response of the late imperial, early Republican, Nanjing Republic, and the PRC regimes in response to China's changing international setting, to successive revolutions in warfare, and to fundamental economic, social and demographic trends domestically from the 16th century to present. It will assess the capacities of each successive Chinese state to extract resources from society and economy and to mobilize people behind national purposes, to elaborate centralized institutions to pursue national priorities, to marshal military forces for national defense and police forces to sustain domestic order, and to generate popular identities loyal to national authority.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Miller, A. (PI)

EASTASN 285: The United States, China, & Global Security

This graduate-level seminar will be taught simultaneously on the campuses of Stanford University and Peking University and will feature a lecture series in which prominent American and Chinese scholars provide presentations that focus on key global security issues. The course content will highlight topics relevant to current U.S.- China relations and their respective roles in Asian and global security. Proposed lecture topics include: an introduction to U.S.- China relations; finance, trade, and investment; cyber security; nonproliferation; maritime security; terrorism; and energy and the environment. Hosted jointly by Stanford University and Peking University, enrollment will be limited to 20 students at each campus and, at Stanford, will be restricted to graduate students and undergraduates with senior standing. Enrollment is competitive, so potential students must complete an application by March 12, 2018 at 5pm: https://web.stanford.edu/dept/CEAS/EASTASN285.fb
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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