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21 - 30 of 311 results for: CSI::certificate ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

CEE 64: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions (CEE 263D)

Survey of Survey of air pollution and global warming and their renewable energy solutions. Topics: evolution of the Earth's atmosphere, history of discovery of chemicals in the air, bases and particles in urban smog, visibility, indoor air pollution, acid rain, stratospheric and Antarctic ozone loss, the historic climate record, causes and effects of global warming, impacts of energy systems on pollution and climate, renewable energy solutions to air pollution and global warming. UG Reqs: GER: DBNatSci
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jacobson, M. (PI)

CEE 100: Managing Sustainable Building Projects

Managing the life cycle of buildings from the owner, designer, and contractor perspectives emphasizing sustainability goals; methods to define, communicate, coordinate, and manage multidisciplinary project objectives including scope, quality, life cycle cost and value, schedule, safety, energy, and social concerns; roles, responsibilities, and risks for project participants; virtual design and construction methods for product, organization, and process modeling; lifecycle assessment methods; individual writing assignment related to a real world project.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Fischer, M. (PI)

CEE 107A: Understanding Energy (CEE 207A, EARTHSYS 103)

Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storag more »
Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change, sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD based on student schedules). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Ginnebaugh. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ Course was formerly called Energy Resources.nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107S.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 125: Defining Smart Cities: Visions of Urbanism for the 21st Century (CEE 225, URBANST 174)

In a rapidly urbanizing world, the city paves the way toward sustainability and social well-being. But what does it mean for a city to be smart? Does that also make it sustainable or resilient or livable? This seminar delves into current debates about urbanism through weekly talks by experts on topics such as big data, human-centered design, urban sustainability, and natural capital. The goal of the seminar is to explore how advances in information communication technologies affect the built environment at various scales (e.g., cities, districts, neighborhoods, blocks, buildings and to understand the role of multiple actors working at the intersection of technology and urbanism. The seminar will provoke vigorous discussion of how urban spaces are shaped, for better or worse, by the complex interaction of technology, human societies, and the natural environment. Students taking the course for 2 units / letter grade will propose an independent research project and present their work at a final symposium.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 141A: Infrastructure Project Development (CEE 241A)

Infrastructure is critical to the economy, global competitiveness and quality of life. Topics include energy, transportation, water, public facilities, and communications sectors. Analysis of the condition of the nation's infrastructure and how projects are planned and financed. Focus is on public works in the U.S. The role of public and private sectors through a step-by-step study of the project development process. Case studies of real infrastructure projects. Industry guest speakers. Student teams prepare project environmental impact statements.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 141C: Global Infrastructure Projects Seminar (CEE 241C)

Nine current global infrastructure projects presented by top project executives or company leaders from industry. Water, transportation, energy and communication projects are featured. Course provides comparisons of project development, win and delivery approaches for mega-projects around the world. Alternative project delivery methods, the role of public and private sector, different project management and construction strategies, and lessons learned. The course also includes field trips to local mega-projects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Sedar, B. (PI)

CEE 144: Design and Innovation for the Circular Economy

The last 150 years of our industrial evolution have been material and energy intensive. The linear model of production and consumption manufactures goods from raw materials, wells and uses them, and then discards the products as waste. Circular economy provides a framework for systems-level redesign. It builds on schools of thought including regenerative design, performance economy industrial ecology, blue economy, biomimicry, and cradle to cradle. This course introduces the concepts of the circular economy and applies them to case studies of consumer products, household goods, and fixed assets.n nStudents will conduct independent projects on circular economy. Students may work alone or in small teams under the guidance of the teaching team and various collaborators worldwide. Class is limited to 14 students. All disciplines are welcome. This class fulfills the Writing & Rhetoric 2 requirement. Prerequisite: PWR 1.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 155: Introduction to Sensing Networks for CEE (CEE 255)

Introduce the design and implementation of sensor networks for monitoring the built and natural environment. Emphasis on the integration of modern sensor and communication technologies, signal processing and statistical models for network data analysis and interpretation to create practical deployments to enable sustainable systems, in areas such as energy, weather, transportation and buildings. Students will be involved in a practical project that may involve deploying a small sensor system, data models and analysis and signal processing. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 156: Building Systems (CEE 256)

HVAC, lighting, and envelope systems for commercial and institutional buildings, with a focus on energy efficient design. Knowledge and skills required in the development of low-energy buildings that provide high quality environment for occupants.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kolderup, E. (PI)

CEE 174A: Providing Safe Water for the Developing and Developed World

This course will cover basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to provide and control water, and will introduce the basics of engineering design. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved. The course should enable students to work competently in environmental engineering firms or on non-profit projects in the developing world such as Engineers without Borders. Pre-requisite: Chem31B/X.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Mitch, W. (PI)
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