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1 - 10 of 16 results for: ILAC ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ILAC 130: Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives

The purpose of this course is to study major figures and historical trends in modern Iberia against the background of the linguistic plurality and social and cultural complexity of the Iberian world. We will study the fundamental issues of empire, the Napoleonic occupation of Spain, Latin American independence, recurring civil wars, federal republicanism, and the historic nationalisms (Galician, Basque, and Catalan), all leading up to the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), which is a defining moment in modern Spanish and European history, with ongoing consequences still felt and debated painfully today in contemporary Spain. This course is designed to help prepare students for their participation in the Stanford overseas study programs in Barcelona and Madrid. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 161: Modern Latin American Literature

From independence to the present. Topics include romantic allegories of thennation; modernism and postmodernism; avant-garde poetry; regionalism versus cosmopolitanism; indigenous and indigenist literature; magical realism and the literature of the boom; Afro-Hispanic literature; and testimonial narrative. Authors may include: Bolívar, Bello, Gómez de Avellaneda, Isaacs, Sarmiento, Machado de Assis, Darío, Martí­, Agustini, Vallejo, Huidobro, Borges, Cortázar, Neruda, Guillon, Rulfo, Ramos, Garcí­a Marquez, Lispector, and Bolaño. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 277: Spanish and Society: Rock en EspaƱol

Can music be a medium to study how a society communicates? This course wants to answer this question by paying attention to how has Spanish changed and adapted in recent history. Taking rock and pop as a global musical phenomenon, the focus of the course will be the most prominent bands and songs in Spanish language. Emphasis is on the analysis of the use of Spanish in real-world contexts. In Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Briceno, X. (PI)

ILAC 280: Latin@ Literature (CHILATST 200, CSRE 200, ILAC 382)

Examines a diverse set of narratives by U.S. Latin@s of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Guatemalan, and Dominican heritage through the lens of latinidad. All share the historical experience of Spanish colonization and U.S. imperialism, yet their im/migration patterns differ, affecting social, cultural, and political trajectories in the US and relationships to "home" and "homeland," nation, diaspora, history, and memory. Explores how racialization informs genders as well as sexualities. Emphasis on textual analysis. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 309: First Year Writing Workshop

This course enables students to develop the writing skills necessary in their academic careers. Course topics include writing in the discipline, critiques, and literature reviews.May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Hoyos, H. (PI)

ILAC 329: Luis de Camoes - Epic

Focus is on Camões's epic masterpiece, Os Lusiadas. Topics include empire, intertextuality, Indian Ocean Studies, history, prophecy, and poetics. Readings in English and Portuguese.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Barletta, V. (PI)

ILAC 382: Latin@ Literature (CHILATST 200, CSRE 200, ILAC 280)

Examines a diverse set of narratives by U.S. Latin@s of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Guatemalan, and Dominican heritage through the lens of latinidad. All share the historical experience of Spanish colonization and U.S. imperialism, yet their im/migration patterns differ, affecting social, cultural, and political trajectories in the US and relationships to "home" and "homeland," nation, diaspora, history, and memory. Explores how racialization informs genders as well as sexualities. Emphasis on textual analysis. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 110: Spanish Society in the 21st Century Through Film

Open to undergraduates with an interest in 21st Century Film and the social reality of Spain nowadays. Explores how Spain has evolved from being one of the most undeveloped European countries to become a first mover in social issues such as gay marriage or women's public role. Topics include racism, migration, the reconstruction of the past and the vision of the other. Themes are analyzed through movies directed by Spanish and American filmmakers such as: Cesc Gay, Bollain, Bigas-Luna, González-Iñárritu and Woody Allen. Class taught in Spanish, readings both in Spanish and English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Bota, M. (PI)

ILAC 199: Individual Work

Open only to students in the department, or by consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 216: Comparative Cities: Travel Literature as Urban Experience in Catalan Culture

Comparative reflection on travel literature, focused on some major Western cities, taking as a starting point the reflections on travel by some of the most prominent Catalan writers in the 20th century. Catalan travel literature, whether autobiographical or in essay form, is often related to literary journalism and exile. The foremost Catalan authors take notice of cities like Paris, Berlin, Madrid, Venice, Buenos Aires and New York, at historically decisive times: the two World Wars, the rise of fascism in Italy, Spain and Germany, the Cold War, the emergence of the United States as a world power. In this sense, travel writers offer a double comparative vantage point: on the one hand, between their own literature and that of other European travel writers; on the other hand, between Barcelona and some of the greatest cities in the world. These contrasts, perceived through the literary lens, help us understand the cosmopolitanism and modernity of Catalan culture. Taught in Spanish; all readings available both in Catalan and Spanish, some readings also available in english.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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