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1 - 10 of 112 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 1B: Global History: The Early Modern World, 1300 to 1800

Topics include early globalization and cross-cultural exchanges; varying and diverse cultural formations in different parts of the world; the growth and interaction of empires and states; the rise of capitalism and the economic divergence of "the west"; changes in the nature of technology, including military and information technologies; migration of ideas and people (including the slave-trade); disease, climate, and environmental change over time. Designed to accommodate beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 6W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking Part I (FEMGEN 6W)

Two-quarter service-learning workshop to accompany course, "Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives." Considers purpose and practice of service learning. Provides training for students' work in community. Examines current scope of human trafficking in Bay Area, pressing concerns, capacity and obstacles to effectively address them. Students work with community partners dedicated to confronting human trafficking and problems it entails on a daily basis.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 10N: Thinking About War

This course examines classic approaches to war as an intellectual problem, looking at how a matter of such great physical violence and passions can be subjected to understanding and used in philosophy, political theory, and art. Questions to be examined include the definition of war, its causes, its moral value, the nature of its participants, its use in the self-definition of individuals and societies, its relation to political authority, warfare and gender, and the problem of civil war.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 16N: Heloise: Love, Learning, and Desire (for God?) in the Twelfth Century (FEMGEN 16N)

Few medieval women have been so often studied and yet so little understood as Heloise, abbess of the Paraclete (d. 1164). Her life, known primarily through the letters that she exchanged with her former husband, the philosopher Peter Abelard (d. 1142), offers a study in contradiction: she was an educated woman at a time when women were supposedly barred from education; a nun who, though dedicated to God, battled sexual desire; a mother, whose spiritual daughters seemingly displaced her one biological son; and a wife, whose husband became her ¿brother¿ in Christ. Traditional accounts have flattened these rich and various contradictions, presenting Heloise primarily as a tragic heroine. Seduced by her much older teacher, this Heloise conceives and bears a child, seeks a love unfettered by bonds of wedlock, and ultimately accepts enclosure in the monastery as her last desperate act of obedience to her lover, Abelard. This seminar revises the traditional image of Heloise, dignifying her as a scholar, monastic reformer, and administrator¿as well as a lover, wife, mother, and friend.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 25N: Stalin's Europe, 1944-1948

This freshman seminar explores the history of wartime and postwar Europe through the lenses of the communist parties of Europe, the anti-Soviet forces on the continent, the devastation of the civilian population, and the intentions and actions of the Soviet Union on the one hand, and the United States on the other. We will analyze issues of resistance and collaboration under the Nazis, Allied occupation, and the division of Europe. We will also consider the forcible displacement of peoples and the fate of Jewish survivors. The idea is to understand the harsh and complex realities of European life and politics in this crucial time frame spanning war and peace. One can discover the beginnings of the Cold War in this period, the first signs of the "Iron Curtain," and the origins of the European Union. Our sources for the reconstruction of European life at this crucial time include documents, memoirs, literature, film, and various collections at the Hoover Archives. In addition to analyzing written and visual materials in discussion, presentations, and short essays, you will engage in a quarter long project on one thematic or country study during this period.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 31: Leonardo's World: Science, Technology, and Art in the Renaissance (HISTORY 131)

What did Leonardo actually know? How did he acquire that knowledge? Explores Leonardo's interests and accomplishments in such fields as painting, architecture, engineering, physics, mathematics, geology, anatomy, and physiology, and more generally the nature of Renaissance science, art, and technology. Considers the nrelationship between the society of fifteenth century Italy and the work of the man nfrom Vinci: why did this world produce a Leonardo? How might we use him to understand creativity, innovation, and invention in the Renaissance and beyond? What was his legacy and how did he become a myth? Designed both for students interested in the history of science, medicine, and technology and for students interested in the history and art of Renaissance Italy.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Brege, B. (PI)

HISTORY 34S: Newspapers, Salons and Coffeehouses: The Rise of the Public in Early Modern Europe

Between Twitter and the NSA, it seems that every aspect of our lives can, voluntarily or involuntarily, be made public with a tap on a screen. But what exactly is the public and where did it come from? In this course, we will explore the rise of the public in 17th and 18th century Europe, through paintings, engravings, newspapers, memoirs, poetry, plays, political cartoons and song. At stake was-- and still is-- the very nature of sovereignty, power, and knowledge. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Barnet, E. (PI)

HISTORY 38A: Germany and the World Wars (JEWISHST 38A)

(Same as HISTORY 138A. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 138A.) Germany's tumultuous history from the Second Empire through the end of the Cold War. International conflict, social upheaval, and state transformation during Bismarck's wars of unification, World War One, the Weimar Republic, the rise of Nazism, World War Two, the Holocaust, the division of communist East and capitalist West Germany, and the fall of the Iron Curtain.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sheffer, E. (PI)

HISTORY 39: Modern Britain and the British Empire

(Same as HISTORY 139. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 139.) From American Independence to the latest war in Iraq. Topics include: the rise of the modern British state and economy; imperial expansion and contraction; the formation of class, gender, and national identities; mass culture and politics; the world wars; and contemporary racial politics. Focus is on questions of decline, the fortunes and contradictions of British liberalism in an era of imperialism, and the weight of the past in contemporary Britain.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Satia, P. (PI)

HISTORY 40: World History of Science

(Same as HISTORY 140. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 140.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Proctor, R. (PI)
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