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61 - 70 of 131 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 241D: Einstein and the Structure of Reality (HISTORY 341D)

Albert Einstein once remarked "One cannot help but be in awe when one contemplates the mysteries of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries to contemplate only a little of this mystery each day." In this course we will contemplate the history, science, and philosophy involved in three pathbreaking and contentious episodes in Einstein's lifelong quest to unveil the structure of reality: the special theory of relativity, the general theory of relativity, and the quantum theory.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 242D: Knowledge and Information Infrastructures (STS 166)

This course introduces historical, theoretical, and comparative perspectives on knowledge and information systems from the medieval world to the present. Cases include libraries, meteorology, climate science, the Internet, the World Wide Web, and social science data systems. It theorizes how infrastructures form, how they change, and how they shape (and are shaped by) social systems. The course ends with challenges to modern knowledge infrastructures, such as crowdsourcing, citizen science, and alternative and bogus knowledge.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

HISTORY 247C: Revolutionary Mothers, National Fathers: Household, Politics and Nation in 20th Century Africa

A luta continua! This cry, Latin for "the struggle continues," evokes sub-Saharan African liberation struggles. Yet histories of these struggles sometimes cast them narrowly: as quests to transform European colonies into African-governed sovereign nation-states; struggles led by men; or public struggles, conducted in government buildings or on the streets. This course examines how freedom fighting intersected with other processes: changing gender norms, ethnic or religious identification, and labor or housing conditions, paying attention to ways political struggles came into homes.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Quinn, S. (PI)

HISTORY 256G: Constructing Race and Religion in America (AFRICAAM 236, AMSTUD 246, CSRE 246, HISTORY 356G, RELIGST 246, RELIGST 346)

This seminar focuses on the interrelationships between social constructions of race, and social interpretations of religion in America. How have assumptions about race shaped religious worldviews? How have religious beliefs shaped racial attitudes? How have ideas about religion and race contributed to notions of what it means to be "American"? We will look at primary and secondary sources, and at the historical development of ideas and practices over time.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lum, K. (PI)

HISTORY 257: Was the American Revolution a Social Revolution? (HISTORY 357)

What kind of a revolution was the American Revolution? The revolution gave colonial Americans political independence from Britain to found the United States. But did the revolution also transform American society in its wake? This course explores how historians and historical participants alike have answered this question paying attention to historical changes (or lack thereof) that took place in American society between c. 1750-1820 as well as grappling with what conceptually constitutes a "social" revolution in the first place.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gienapp, J. (PI)

HISTORY 260: California's Minority-Majority Cities (CSRE 260, URBANST 169)

Historical development and the social, cultural, and political issues that characterize large cities and suburbs where communities of color make up majority populations. Case studies include cities in Los Angeles, Santa Clara, and Monterey counties. Comparisons to minority-majority cities elsewhere in the U.S. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: McKibben, C. (PI)

HISTORY 261G: Presidents and Foreign Policy in Modern History (INTNLREL 173)

Nothing better illustrates the evolution of the modern presidency than the arena of foreign policy. This class will examine the changing role and choices of successive presidential administrations over the past century, examining such factors as geopolitics, domestic politics, the bureaucracy, ideology, psychology, and culture. Students will be encouraged to think historically about the institution of the presidency, while examining specific case studies, from the First World War to the conflicts of the 21st century.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Rakove, R. (PI)

HISTORY 265G: African-American Independent Film- On Both Sides of the Camera (AFRICAAM 265G, HISTORY 365G)

From D. W. Griffith's controversial "Birth of A Nation" (1915) to Nate Parker's also controversial "Birth of a Nation" (2016), Black Americans have played roles in Hollywood movies while also seeking to define how they are depicted in these movies. This course will introduce students to this history by featuring works of pioneering black filmmakers who challenged Hollywood racial stereotypes and created alternative images of the African-American experience.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 268C: Poverty in America (AMSTUD 268C, CSRE 268C, HISTORY 368C)

During the twentieth century, Americans launched numerous bold efforts to reduce poverty in the United States. Federal welfare policy, community-based programs, academic research, philanthropic charity, and grassroots activism committed time and resources to the cause, but poverty-- and inequality-- have persisted. Why? This seminar considers the origins, implementation, and consequences of these remedies, noting in particular how race, gender, citizenship, family composition, and geography have shaped the lives of those in poverty and the public and private responses to it.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dunning, C. (PI)

HISTORY 272D: Teaching Mexican American History in High School (CHILATST 272A, CSRE 272A)

The purpose of the course is two fold: 1) to expose students to salient historical themes and topics in Mexican American history, and 2) to establish a mentoring project with students currently enrolled in Mexican American history courses at Luis Valdez Leadership Academy (LVLA) high school in San Jose. Students will gain a broad understanding of Mexican American history, especially since the early twentieth century, with a particular focus on the Chicano Movement of the 1960s and 1970s. Students must also commit to enrollment in Hist 272F in spring quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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