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11 - 20 of 33 results for: CARDCOURSES::general ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

FRENLANG 10SC: French Immersion: Contemporary Issues in the French-Speaking World

Are you interested in all things French? Do you want to learn about the issues that the Francophone world is facing today? Then the course French Immersion: Contemporary Issues in the French-speaking world offered next September is perfect for you! Immerse yourself in the French language and culture through an intense but rewarding program. You will read contemporary authors, work with films, news videos and songs, and learn about French and Francophone societies while improving your linguistic proficiency. The course will examine social and political topics such as national identity, immigration and post-colonial literatures. It will also include several organized student outings, an on-campus crêpe night, and many other French themed activities outside of the classroom.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FRENLANG 23C: Second-Year French: Cultural Emphasis, Third Quarter

Continuation of FRENLANG 22C. Sequence integrating culture and language. Emphasis is on advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse including presentational language and socio culturally appropriate discourse in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. Prerequisite: placement Test, FRENLANG 22C.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GSBGEN 381: Philanthropy: Strategy, Innovation and Social Change

Appropriate for any student driven to effect positive social change from either the for-profit or nonprofit sector, Philanthropy will challenge students to expand their own strategic thinking about philanthropic aspiration and action. In recent decades, philanthropy has become an industry in itself - amounting to over $358 billion in the year 2014. Additionally, the last decade has seen unprecedented innovation in both philanthropy and social value creation. This course explores the key operational and strategic distinctions between traditional philanthropic entities, such as community foundations, private foundations and corporate foundations; and innovative models, including funding intermediaries, open-source platforms, technology-driven philanthropies, impact investing and venture philanthropy. Course work will include readings and case discussions that encourage students to analyze both domestic and global philanthropic strategies as they relate to foundation mission, grantmaking, more »
Appropriate for any student driven to effect positive social change from either the for-profit or nonprofit sector, Philanthropy will challenge students to expand their own strategic thinking about philanthropic aspiration and action. In recent decades, philanthropy has become an industry in itself - amounting to over $358 billion in the year 2014. Additionally, the last decade has seen unprecedented innovation in both philanthropy and social value creation. This course explores the key operational and strategic distinctions between traditional philanthropic entities, such as community foundations, private foundations and corporate foundations; and innovative models, including funding intermediaries, open-source platforms, technology-driven philanthropies, impact investing and venture philanthropy. Course work will include readings and case discussions that encourage students to analyze both domestic and global philanthropic strategies as they relate to foundation mission, grantmaking, evaluation, financial management, infrastructure, knowledge management, policy change and board governance. Guest speakers will consist of high profile philanthropists, foundation presidents, social entrepreneurs and Silicon Valley business leaders creating new philanthropic models. The course will also provide students with real-world grantmaking experience in completing nonprofit organizational assessments and making grants to organizations totaling $20,000.n
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

LAW 805F: Policy Practicum: Endstage Decisions

(Formerly Law 413Z) Medical decisions toward the end of life can be crucial and difficult for patients, doctors, and families. Law and medicine have been struggling to find ways to strike a balance between what the patients might want (or say they want), and what makes medical, economic, and ethical sense. One standard is the "Advanced Health Care Directive" (Directive), which guides doctors and surrogates (usually a family member) on what to do when faced with end-of-life dilemmas. Another form, adopted in just over half the states (including California) is the POLST (Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment). The two types are supposed to complement each other, but they are different in important ways. The Advanced Health Care Directive expresses what a person wants and/or appoints a surrogate in case the patient is unable to express her wishes. Anybody can fill out a Directive, at any time of life. Ideally, a copy goes to the surrogate, if one is appointed, and another to the more »
(Formerly Law 413Z) Medical decisions toward the end of life can be crucial and difficult for patients, doctors, and families. Law and medicine have been struggling to find ways to strike a balance between what the patients might want (or say they want), and what makes medical, economic, and ethical sense. One standard is the "Advanced Health Care Directive" (Directive), which guides doctors and surrogates (usually a family member) on what to do when faced with end-of-life dilemmas. Another form, adopted in just over half the states (including California) is the POLST (Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment). The two types are supposed to complement each other, but they are different in important ways. The Advanced Health Care Directive expresses what a person wants and/or appoints a surrogate in case the patient is unable to express her wishes. Anybody can fill out a Directive, at any time of life. Ideally, a copy goes to the surrogate, if one is appointed, and another to the primary care physician. The POLST form is meant for people who are seriously ill. The Directive (for example "no artificial nutrition by tube") is supposed to be controlling; the patient, of course, can change her mind; but there is no surrogate. It is an agreement between the patient and the doctor. Who uses these different forms? How effective are they? To what extent and in what situations are they useful? Working closely with Stanford Hospital as the client, students will not only look at current literature on the topic and build on past practicum research, but also conduct interviews with doctors, nurses, and other health care specialists with the goal of finding out what local hospitals and nursing homes are doing. The aim is to get a more realistic picture of the what one might call the living law of the Directive and the POLST. The ultimate goal is policy recommendations to improve the forms and associated laws and to examine alternative approaches. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Final Paper. -- NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 805R: Policy Practicum: Rethinking Campus and School Title IX Policies and Procedures

Client: National Women's Law Center. This practicum continues policy research and advocacy undertaken in Spring 2017 (see description below). Day/Time: TBD scheduled in accordance with registered student availability. Students will refine and finalize policy and procedures , including suggestions from clients and stakeholders, and the priorities that emerged from "The Way Forward" Title IX Conference in Spring 2017 at Stanford Law School. We will seek further feedback from legal, survivor, and other stakeholder groups, and work in conjunction with the National Women's Law Center (NWLC) to disseminate the findings and recommendations to the target end-user groups. This Practicum builds on the skills of thinking about law in an integrated way and situating policy in a direct social context where it can be more readily applied. The project provides students with first-hand experience in gaining a broad and nuanced understanding of emerging social, legal, and policy dilemmas. Given all the more »
Client: National Women's Law Center. This practicum continues policy research and advocacy undertaken in Spring 2017 (see description below). Day/Time: TBD scheduled in accordance with registered student availability. Students will refine and finalize policy and procedures , including suggestions from clients and stakeholders, and the priorities that emerged from "The Way Forward" Title IX Conference in Spring 2017 at Stanford Law School. We will seek further feedback from legal, survivor, and other stakeholder groups, and work in conjunction with the National Women's Law Center (NWLC) to disseminate the findings and recommendations to the target end-user groups. This Practicum builds on the skills of thinking about law in an integrated way and situating policy in a direct social context where it can be more readily applied. The project provides students with first-hand experience in gaining a broad and nuanced understanding of emerging social, legal, and policy dilemmas. Given all the controversy surrounding sexual assault on college campuses, surprisingly little is actually known about the policies and processes that are currently in use, nor any way of easily ascertaining what the majority of an institution's "peer schools" are doing with respect to solving a challenge or addressing an issue. There is no set of "best practices" to which school administrators can easily turn. The goal of the practicum is to produce a free, web-based, open-source set of adaptable model policies and procedures that are targeted to different market segments and stakeholders (i.e., large private, large public, small private, HBCU, community colleges, and k12). Enrollment is limited and preference will be given to students enrolled in the Spring 2017 Seminar/Policy Lab Practicum. Students from CS or EE or who have coding and have an interest in the design and building of the online platform would be welcome to join the Policy Lab as well. Over the past four years, the issue of campus sexual assault has exploded into the public discourse. While definitive figures are difficult to obtain due to the necessarily private nature of these events, several recent studies estimate that between 20-25% of college women (and a similar proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as around 5-10% of male students)experience sexual assault. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators, launching one of the most successful, and surprising, social movements in recent memory. Statistics are equally disturbing in the middle and high school context. As a result, the federal government has stepped up its civil rights enforcement in this area, with over 250 colleges and universities currently under investigation for allegedly mishandling student sexual assault complaints. At the same time, students accused of sexual assault have complained of botched processes driven by a "campus rape over-correction" that denied them a fair disciplinary hearing. It is clear that schools are struggling to develop and implement policies and procedures that satisfy their legal obligations in this area. This course focuses on the legal and policy issues surrounding the highly challenging area of investigation and adjudication of sexual assault and other gender-motivated violence on college campuses and in K12 schools. It covers the federal and state legal frameworks governing these procedures including Title IX, the Violence Against Women Act, and the Clery Act, and examines current cases as well as the rapidly evolving legal, federal regulatory, and political environment surrounding this issue. Guest speakers working in the area will help to broaden students' understanding of the subject matter. NOTES: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Units: 1-3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: Dauber, M. (PI)

LAW 805Y: Policy Practicum: Managing Gentrification

Gentrification is a concern for policy makers in successful and diverse cities. Gentrification can improve neighborhoods that suffer from underinvestment, but it can also cause the displacement of long-term residents, cherished landmarks and long-standing businesses and it can make neighborhoods homogenous, sterile and less able to meet the day-to-day needs of their residents. A gentrifying city can be a city in the process of losing the variety and dynamism that made it attractive to investors and successful people in the first place. And of course, gentrifying cities are unaffordable to low-income residents. Because of rising rents, many neighborhoods in San Francisco are already unable to sustain such businesses as dry cleaners, laundry services, drug stores and affordable restaurants. A neighborhood with nothing but fancy wine bars, chic clothing shops, gourmet restaurants and trendy coffee houses selling $5 drip coffee is not in crisis, but a city with only such neighborhoods argu more »
Gentrification is a concern for policy makers in successful and diverse cities. Gentrification can improve neighborhoods that suffer from underinvestment, but it can also cause the displacement of long-term residents, cherished landmarks and long-standing businesses and it can make neighborhoods homogenous, sterile and less able to meet the day-to-day needs of their residents. A gentrifying city can be a city in the process of losing the variety and dynamism that made it attractive to investors and successful people in the first place. And of course, gentrifying cities are unaffordable to low-income residents. Because of rising rents, many neighborhoods in San Francisco are already unable to sustain such businesses as dry cleaners, laundry services, drug stores and affordable restaurants. A neighborhood with nothing but fancy wine bars, chic clothing shops, gourmet restaurants and trendy coffee houses selling $5 drip coffee is not in crisis, but a city with only such neighborhoods arguably is. This practicum builds on previous Policy Lab research, working closely with the San Francisco Mayor's Office of Housing and Community Development, to examine the challenges of gentrification in San Francisco. Issues include researching policy responses to the displacement of legacy businesses and non-profit enterprises and analyzing the effects of rising property values and rents on the diversity of businesses in San Francisco neighborhoods. Students interested in this policy lab should submit a consent form with a C/V and statement of interest to be reviewed by Professor Ford and San Francisco city officials. Students wishing to undertake R credit will perform additional research for a white paper analyzing the issues and results of the collective research. R credit is possible only by consent of the instructor. After the term begins, and with the consent of the instructor, students accepted into the course may transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: Ford, R. (PI)

LAW 806C: Policy Practicum: Fake News and Misinformation

CLIENT: Hewlett Foundation Madison Initiative. This Practicum works closely with the Hewlett Foundation Madison Initiative on an exhaustive study of fake news, misinformation, disinformation and propaganda and their implications for democracy in America and around the world. The client, the Hewlett Foundation Madison Initiative, is developing a grant-making program for interventions in the spread of fake news and misinformation which also promote accurate information for a healthy, deliberative democracy. The Practicum builds on the work of a Spring 2017 Practicum, led by Senator Russ Feingold, which analyzed the roles of major online platforms -- Google, Facebook, Reddit, and Twitter -- in proliferating fake news and misinformation in the 2016 election. Students will contribute to that study with their own independent research focusing on such issues as self-regulation by the platforms, legal and regulatory frameworks, analysis of algorithms and user data, and other issues that arise more »
CLIENT: Hewlett Foundation Madison Initiative. This Practicum works closely with the Hewlett Foundation Madison Initiative on an exhaustive study of fake news, misinformation, disinformation and propaganda and their implications for democracy in America and around the world. The client, the Hewlett Foundation Madison Initiative, is developing a grant-making program for interventions in the spread of fake news and misinformation which also promote accurate information for a healthy, deliberative democracy. The Practicum builds on the work of a Spring 2017 Practicum, led by Senator Russ Feingold, which analyzed the roles of major online platforms -- Google, Facebook, Reddit, and Twitter -- in proliferating fake news and misinformation in the 2016 election. Students will contribute to that study with their own independent research focusing on such issues as self-regulation by the platforms, legal and regulatory frameworks, analysis of algorithms and user data, and other issues that arise with current events or through ongoing research findings. Students will undertake literature reviews, legal case analysis, investigations of business practices and algorithms associated with the relevant platforms, surveys of the roles of foreign governments, and analysis of policy proposals to combat fake news, misinformation, disinformation, and propaganda. In addition to law, students in the fields of communications, computer science, journalism, political science, and public policy are especially welcome to join the research team. Students will meet one on one with Professor Persily to frame their research and discuss their findings. Students may enroll in any quarter. Those law students seeking R credit may, with consent of the instructor, move from section 1 to section 2. Section 1 is open enrollment for any law or graduate student. Undergraduates may, in exceptional cases, be admitted to the Practicum with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation, Final Paper. NOTES: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: Persily, N. (PI)

MED 161A: Community Health Advocacy

First of a three-quarter course series providing students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service organizations, students broaden and deepen their understanding of the social and economic determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can be addressed. Fellows engage in structured activities centered around supporting the mission of placement organizations. Students must apply and be accepted into the program the winter preceding enrollment; application information at och.stanford.edu. Additional prerequisites: Med 157 or equivalent coursework. Spanish language proficiency required for most placements.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 161B: Community Health Advocacy

Second of a three-quarter course series that provides students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service organizations, student will broaden and deepen their understanding of the social and economic determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can ¿ and should ¿ be addressed. Student will engage in structured activities that center around supporting the mission of their placement organization: direct service with clients and design and implementation of a capacity-building project. Weekly Monday evening classroom meetings serve as a forum for teaching and training, discussion of class readings and placement experiences, project development, and troubleshooting and support. Prerequisites: MED 257A.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 161C: Community Health Advocacy

Third of a three-quarter course series that provides students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service organizations, students broaden and deepen their understanding of the social and economic determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can ¿ and should ¿ be addressed. Student engage in structured activities that center around supporting the mission of their placement organization: direct service with clients and design and implementation of a capacity-building project. Weekly evening classroom meetings serve as a forum for teaching and training, discussion of class readings and placement experiences, project development, and troubleshooting and support. Prerequisites: MED 257A/B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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