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31 - 40 of 64 results for: URBANST

URBANST 137: Innovations in Microcredit and Development Finance (PUBLPOL 137)

The role of innovative financial institutions in supporting economic development, the alleviation of rural and urban poverty, and gender equity. Analysis of the strengths and limits of commercial banks, public development banks, credit unions, and microcredit organizations both in the U.S. and internationally. Readings include academic journal articles, formal case studies, evaluations, and annual reports. Priority to students who have taken any portion of the social innovation series: URBANST 131, 132, or 133. Recommended: ECON 1A or 1B.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 138SI: Scaling Impact with VIP

Social entrepreneurship is innovating new ways to create social value. This course will focus on the challenges of scaling social enterprises during the many stages of maturity. This class will act an adjunct (auxiliary, complementary) class to VIP: Very Impactful People Speaker Series ( URBANST 131). VIP speakers will stay after their lectures to provide insight on their experience in scaling, be it through detailed case studies or structured Q&A discussion. Note: students do not need to separately register for Urban Studies 131. The two credit units for this course is inclusive of the one credit unit a student would otherwise receive for Urban Studies 131.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

URBANST 139: Urban Africa (AFRICAST 138B, ANTHRO 138B)

This course explores the production of urban space and the social, cultural, and political significance of cities in sub-Saharan Africa. Topics include: architecture and the built environment; urban planning and colonial public health; migration and rural-urban dynamics; youth, politics, and popular culture; violence, policing, and the privatization of public space; (in)formality in housing, transportation, and employment; class, gender, and mobility in the public sphere; urban citizenship and `right to the city¿ movements; gentrification, tourism, and the commodification of poverty; and efforts to (re)theorize postcolonial African cities. Readings are drawn from anthropology, history, urban studies, and geography. Discussion will situate struggles over urban forms and the contours of everyday life within broader trends in the political economy of the region from the late colonial period to the present.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

URBANST 140: Urban Ethnography (ANTHRO 102)

Ethnographic research and writing focuses on the ways our lives are shaped by interacting forces such as history, political economy, and creative cultural practices. In the last fifty years, more and more cultural anthropology has been carried out in urban contexts, due to both urbanization around the world and changes in anthropology as a field. This seminar focuses on careful reading and analysis of book-length ethnographies about urban cultures, people and dynamics to consider what the theory and methodological tools of anthropology have to offer us as we seek to better understand ¿the city.¿ Readings include a variety of approaches to ethnographic research in and/or about cities, with a mix from different eras and about different cities around the world.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 141: Gentrification (CSRE 141)

Neighborhoods in the Bay Area and around the world are undergoing a transformation known as gentrification. Middle- and upper-income people are moving into what were once low-income areas, and housing costs are on the rise. Tensions between ¿newcomers¿ and ¿old timers,¿ who are often separated by race, ethnicity, or sexual orientation, can erupt; high rents may force long-time residents to leave. In this class we will move beyond simplistic media depictions to explore the complex history, nature, causes and consequences of this process. Students will learn through readings, films, class discussions, and engagement with a local community organization
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kahan, M. (PI)

URBANST 142: Paris: The Making of a Modern Icon (FRENCH 227, HISTORY 239E)

Few places have been as heavily romanticized and mythologized as Paris. To many observers, Paris and its attractions serve as icons of modernity itself. By engaging with fiction, film, journalism, painting, photography, poetry, song, and other media, we¿ll trace how different people at different times have used Paris as both backdrop and main protagonist, and we'll consider how the city itself has incorporated and rebelled against such representations. The scope of our inquiry will stretch from the late 18th century to the present, covering a host of topics, figures, and sites: from the French Revolution to the protests of May '68, from Baudelaire to Hemingway, from the Impressionists to the Situationists. Taught in English
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 144: Cities and Citizens in the Middle East (ANTHRO 149A)

This course will explore historical formation of cities and citizens in the Eastern Mediterranean since the 19th century.We will explore urban development, economy, social classes and local politics with a focus Egypt and Turkey and in particular two world-historical cities, Cairo and Istanbul. Drawing on history, cultural anthropology, geography and sociology disciplines, we will examine how urban space in Egypt and Turkey have reconfigured through histories of colonialism, nationalism, developmentalism and globalization. Rural to urban immigration, informality, gendered places, consumption, urban regeneration, local politics and branding the city will be the themes of our discussion. We will study these themes in relation to two main questions: How do spatial changes engender new social practices and redefine cultural difference?; How do power struggles at the intersection of local and global interests shape urban change? It will be of interest for urban studies majors and other students at all levels who would like to study urban struggles and change in Turkey, Egypt, the Middle East and the Global South.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

URBANST 145: International Urbanization Seminar: Cross-Cultural Collaboration for Sustainable Urban Development (CEE 126, EARTHSYS 138, IPS 274)

Comparative approach to sustainable cities, with focus on international practices and applicability to China. Tradeoffs regarding land use, infrastructure, energy and water, and the need to balance economic vitality, environmental quality, cultural heritage, and social equity. Student teams collaborate with Chinese faculty and students partners to support urban sustainability projects. Limited enrollment via application; see internationalurbanization.org for details. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor(s).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 150: From Gold Rush to Google Bus: History of San Francisco (AMSTUD 150X, HISTORY 152E)

This class will examine the history of San Francisco from Native American and colonial settlement through the present. Focus is on social, environmental, and political history, with the theme of power in the city. Topics include Indians and Spanish settlers, the Gold Rush, immigration and nativism, earthquake and fire, progressive reform and unionism, gender, race and civil rights, sexuality and politics, redevelopment and gentrification.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 160: Environmental Policy and the City in U.S. History

Looks at the historical backgrounds of current issues in urban environmental policy, including waste, transportation, air pollution, and other major issues. Covers the period 1800 to the present. Explores the relevance of historical scholarship
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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