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31 - 40 of 50 results for: VPGE::Communication ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

EFSLANG 698B: Advanced Graduate Writing

Focus on clarity, accuracy, and appropriate style. For graduate students experienced in English writing and currently required to write for courses and research. Class meetings and individual conferences. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 698A. Enrollment limited to 14. May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EFSLANG 698C: Writing and Presenting Research

For advanced graduate students completing major research projects. Revising and editing strategies for preparing papers, conference abstracts, and poster presentations. Practice adapting written and oral presentational content and style to different audiences. Students present their research and receive instructor and peer feedback, with regular individual tutorials in addition to class work. Enrollment limited to 12. May be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: Students required by the EFS Placement Exam to take EFSLANG 691, 697, 698A, or 698B may not enroll in 698C until those requirements have been fulfilled. Others may sign up directly.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Hubbard, P. (PI)

ENGR 103: Public Speaking (ENGR 203)

Priority to Engineering students. Introduction to speaking activities, from impromptu talks to carefully rehearsed formal professional presentations. How to organize and write speeches, analyze audiences, create and use visual aids, combat nervousness, and deliver informative and persuasive speeches effectively. Weekly class practice, rehearsals in one-on-one tutorials, videotaped feedback. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Vassar, M. (PI)

ENGR 202S: Directed Writing Projects

Individualized writing instruction for students working on writing projects such as dissertations, proposals, grant applications, theses, journal articles, conference papers, and teaching and research statements. Weekly one-on-one conferences with writing instructors from the Technical Communication Program. Students receive close attention to and detailed feedback on their writing. No prerequisite. Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit. This course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: McDevitt, M. (PI)

ENGR 202W: Technical Communication

This course focuses on how to write clear, concise, and organized technical writing. Through interactive presentations, group workshops, and individual conferences, students learn best practices for communicating to academic and professional audiences for a range of purposes.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 281: d.media - Designing Media that Matters

The combination of always-on smartphones, instant access to information and global social sharing is changing behavior and shifting cultural norms. How can we design digital experiences that make this change positive? Join the d.media team and find out! This course is project-based and hands-on. Three projects will explore visual design, interaction design and behavioral design all in the context of today's technology landscape and in service of a socially positive user experience. See http://dmedia.stanford.edu, Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 311D: Portfolio to Professional: Supporting the Development of Digital Presence Through ePortfolios

This course guides graduate students in creating a professional ePortfolio and establishing an online presence. The course includes seminar-style presentations and discussions, opportunities for feedback with career mentors, classmates, alumni, employers, and other community members using think-aloud protocols and peer review approaches. Curriculum modules focus on strategies for telling your story in the digital environment, platform considerations, evidence and architecture, visual design and user experience. Open to all graduate students and majors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 205: Effective Scientific Presentation and Public Speaking

The ability to present your work in a compelling, concise, and engaging manner will enhance your professional career. This course breaks down presentations into their key elements: the opening, body of the talk, closing, slide and poster graphics, Q&A, pacing, pauses, and voice modulation. The class is a series of several minute log stand-and-deliver exercises in which you get immediate class feedback and then re-do it on the fly. In addition, each participant will use their upcoming conference talk or poster (e.g., AGU, SEG), or upcoming job talk or funding pitch, as a final project. In addition to the class sessions, I will spend 60-90 min with each student individually. Everyone will come away a more skilled and confident speaker than they were before. Instructor: Ross S. Stein (Temblor.net, Emeritus USGS). The course syllabus can be found at http://temblor.net/team/ross-stein/
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Stein, R. (PI)

GSBGEN 515: Essentials of Strategic Communication

Successful leaders understand the power of authentic, memorable communication.This course uses the lens of oral communication and presentations, to introduce the essential elements of the strategic communication strategies that make authentic, memorable communication work. Focusing on oral communication and presentation, we introduce the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, message construction, communicator credibility, and delivery. Deliverables include written documents, focusing on individual and team presentations, with students receiving continuous feedback to improve their communication effectiveness, and to sharpen their authentic leadership voice. This highly interactive, practical course, is focused on feedback to help students at all levels of communication mastery develop confidence in their speaking and writing. Course includes presentations, assignments, lectures, discussions, simulated activities, in-class feedback, and filmed feedback. more »
Successful leaders understand the power of authentic, memorable communication.This course uses the lens of oral communication and presentations, to introduce the essential elements of the strategic communication strategies that make authentic, memorable communication work. Focusing on oral communication and presentation, we introduce the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, message construction, communicator credibility, and delivery. Deliverables include written documents, focusing on individual and team presentations, with students receiving continuous feedback to improve their communication effectiveness, and to sharpen their authentic leadership voice. This highly interactive, practical course, is focused on feedback to help students at all levels of communication mastery develop confidence in their speaking and writing. Course includes presentations, assignments, lectures, discussions, simulated activities, in-class feedback, and filmed feedback. In this course you will learn to: 1) Recognize strategically effective communication 2) Implement the principles of strategic communication across different platforms 3) Develop clearly organized and effective presentations and documents 4) Diagnose and expand, your personal authentic communication style. As you make your super round selection, keep in mind that wait lists have been long for this course.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 565: Political Communication: How Leaders Become Leaders

Politics, perhaps like no other arena, provides a rich and dramatic laboratory for studying the art and science of influential communication. Whether it is a local school bond election or a Congressional race, a Presidential debate or a State of the Union Address, the demanding communications of politics provide insights into our own strengths and gaps as a communicator and leader. Political campaigns, by their very nature, are highly visible, oriented toward very specific objectives, and increasingly leverage a variety of new media platforms. They are often emotionally charged, and rife with conflict and drama. The principles of political communications transcend politics, and are useful guides for leaders in business, the non-profit community, as well as government. How candidates, elected officials, and leaders in all kinds of organizations communicate vision, values, and experience, as well as how they perform in very fluid environments, not the least of which may be during a crisi more »
Politics, perhaps like no other arena, provides a rich and dramatic laboratory for studying the art and science of influential communication. Whether it is a local school bond election or a Congressional race, a Presidential debate or a State of the Union Address, the demanding communications of politics provide insights into our own strengths and gaps as a communicator and leader. Political campaigns, by their very nature, are highly visible, oriented toward very specific objectives, and increasingly leverage a variety of new media platforms. They are often emotionally charged, and rife with conflict and drama. The principles of political communications transcend politics, and are useful guides for leaders in business, the non-profit community, as well as government. How candidates, elected officials, and leaders in all kinds of organizations communicate vision, values, and experience, as well as how they perform in very fluid environments, not the least of which may be during a crisis, has a great deal to do with their career success. In its ninth year, this highly interactive course allows students to explore both theory and practice behind effective positioning and presentation. Last year was a presidential election year in the United States, and was an extraordinary event in many respects. Students will analyze and evaluate both successful and unsuccessful communications strategies of political campaigns and candidates. They will explore historic examples of US Presidential debates, from Nixon/Kennedy to the present. Further they will experience political events as they happen -- like last year's campaigns -- with each class drawing lessons from political developments around the nation and the world. Students will also hone their own strategic communications skills in activities requiring both written and spoken communication. This is not a course in political science, American government, or in public speaking. However, the engaged student will gain insights into those areas as well.The course is taught by David Demarest, Vice President of Public Affairs for Stanford University. Demarest has broad communications experience across the public and private sector in financial services, education, and government. After serving as Assistant U.S. Trade Representative, and Assistant Secretary of Labor in the Reagan Administration, in 1988 he served as Communications Director for Vice President George H. W. Bush's successful presidential campaign. He then became a member of the White House senior staff as White House Communications Director. After leaving government in 1993, he spent the next decade leading communications for two Fortune 50 companies, before coming to Stanford in 2005.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
Instructors: Demarest, D. (PI)
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