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1 - 10 of 12 results for: ITALIAN ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ITALIAN 41N: Imagining Italy

No city in Italy has inspired the imagination of writers, artists, and filmmakers more than Venice, with its golden dance of water and stone, its carnival masks, and its melancholic intimations of mortality. This course will be devoted to the city¿s imaginary life in literature and film. Readings include Marco Polo, Henry James¿s The Aspern Papers, Italo Calvino¿s Invisible Cities, John Ruskin¿s The Stones of Venice, and Joseph Brodsky¿s Watermarks. Films include ¿Dangerous Beauty,¿ ¿Casanova,¿ ¿Don¿t Look Now,¿ ¿Death in Venice,¿ and ¿The Comfort of Strangers.¿
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Harrison, R. (PI)

ITALIAN 101: Italy: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Renowned for its rich cultural tradition, Italy is also one of the most problematic nations in Europe. This course explores the contradictions at the heart of Italy by examining how art and literature provide a unique perspective onto modern Italian history. We will focus on key phenomena that contribute both positively and negatively to the complex "spirit" of Italy, such as the presence of the past, political realism and idealism, revolution, corruption, decadence, war, immigration, and crises of all kinds. Through the study of historical and literary texts, films, and news media, the course seeks to understand Italy's current place in Europe and its future trajectory by looking to its past as a point of comparison. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ITALIAN 102: Masterpieces: Boccaccio's Decameron

This course offer an in-depth consideration of Boccaccio's masterpiece The Decameron. We will pay special attention to Boccaccio's unparalleled art of storytelling; at his distinctly "modern" sensibility; and at the new kind of heroes his book champions: heroes of wit, imagination, free-thinking and self-reliance. Finally we will consider the erotic exuberance of many of Boccaccio's tales.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ITALIAN 128: The Italian Renaissance and the Path to Modernity

The literature, art, and history of the Renaissance and beyond. Readings from the 15th through 18th centuries include Moderata Fonte, Machiavelli, Ariosto, Tasso, Galileo, and Goldoni. Taught in Italian. Prerequisites: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent (2 years of Italian)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Springer, C. (PI)

ITALIAN 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

Required gateway course for Philosophical and Literary Thought; crosslisted in departments sponsoring the Philosophy and Literature track. Majors should register in their home department; non-majors may register in any sponsoring department. Introduction to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature, with particular focus on the question of value: what, if anything, does engagement with literary works do for our lives? Issues include aesthetic self-fashioning, the paradox of tragedy, the paradox of caring, the truth-value of fiction, metaphor, authorship, irony, make-believe, expression, edification, clarification, and training. Readings are drawn from literature and film, philosophical theories of art, and stylistically interesting works of philosophy. Authors may include Sophocles, Chaucer, Dickinson, Proust, Woolf, Borges, Beckett, Kundera, Charlie Kaufman; Barthes, Foucault, Nussbaum, Walton, Nehamas; Plato, Montaigne, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ITALIAN 199: Individual Work

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ITALIAN 228: Science, technology and society and the humanities in the face of the looming disaster (FRENCH 228, POLISCI 233F)

How STS and the Humanities can together help think out the looming catastrophes that put the future of humankind in jeopardy.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ITALIAN 257: Simone de Beauvoir, Hannah Arendt, and Adriana Cavarero (FRENCH 257, FRENCH 357, ITALIAN 357)

What does it mean to say the personal is the political, or, in the case of Arendt, that the personal is not political, especially if you are woman? This course explores how De Beauvoir, Arendt, and Caverero contend with this question and how all three of them think, each in her own way, outside the box of philosophy, of political science, of ethics, and of feminism. Particular attention will be given to the role of art in directing social change and personal transformation, and to the enduring relevance of these women's thought today. Texts include The Second Sex, The Ethics of Ambiguity, The Human Condition, Between Past and Future, Stately Bodies, and Relating Narratives.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ITALIAN 357: Simone de Beauvoir, Hannah Arendt, and Adriana Cavarero (FRENCH 257, FRENCH 357, ITALIAN 257)

What does it mean to say the personal is the political, or, in the case of Arendt, that the personal is not political, especially if you are woman? This course explores how De Beauvoir, Arendt, and Caverero contend with this question and how all three of them think, each in her own way, outside the box of philosophy, of political science, of ethics, and of feminism. Particular attention will be given to the role of art in directing social change and personal transformation, and to the enduring relevance of these women's thought today. Texts include The Second Sex, The Ethics of Ambiguity, The Human Condition, Between Past and Future, Stately Bodies, and Relating Narratives.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ITALIAN 395: Philosophical Reading Group (COMPLIT 359A, FRENCH 395)

Discussion of one contemporary or historical text from the Western philosophical tradition per quarter in a group of faculty and graduate students. For admission of new participants, a conversation with H. U. Gumbrecht is required. May be repeated for credit. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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