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1 - 10 of 19 results for: URBANST

URBANST 27Q: Sophomore Seminar: Three Detectives, Three Cities

This seminar will analyze the social reality of three historic cities (London in the 1880s and 90s, San Francisco in the 1920s and 30s, and contemporary Shanghai) through the prism of popular crime fiction featuring three great literary detectives (Arthur Conan Doyle¿s Sherlock Holmes, Dashiell Hammett¿s Sam Spade, and Qiu Xiaolong¿s Chief Inspector Chen). As a student in this course, you will explore why crime fiction is so popular, why the fear of crime is so much a part of modern urban culture, and why the police detective and the private investigator have become iconic code heroes of pulp fiction, movies, TV shows, and even video games. If you take this class, you will have the opportunity to write a paper and present your research on one of the classic literary detectives or on one of today¿s related manifestations of the same impulse in mass-market tales of superheroes, vampires, and the zombie apocalypse.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Stout, F. (PI)

URBANST 101: Public Service Internship Preparation (ARTSINST 40, EARTHSYS 9, EDUC 9, HUMBIO 9, PUBLPOL 74)

Are you prepared for your internship this summer? This workshop series will help you make the most of your internship experience by setting learning goals in advance; negotiating and communicating clear roles and expectations; preparing for a professional role in a non-profit, government, or community setting; and reflecting with successful interns and community partners on how to prepare sufficiently ahead of time. You will read, discuss, and hear from guest speakers, as well as develop a learning plan specific to your summer or academic year internship placement. This course is primarily designed for students who have already identified an internship for summer or a later quarter. You are welcome to attend any and all workshops, but must attend the entire series and do the assignments for 1 unit of credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

URBANST 104: Civic Dreams, Human Spaces: Urban Design with People

Intensive two-week studio explores the principles underlying vibrant public spaces. Use observation and prototyping tools to inform the process of urban development. Decode public spaces from multiple perspectives: as sites of recreation, interaction, and political contention; as physical infrastructure that municipalities or grassroots citizen groups build and maintain for the common good; and as places with intangible qualities, such as historical memory, identity, and personal stories. In addition to on-campus meetings, this course requires immersive fieldwork in the City of San Francisco, including two weekend overnight stays and the opportunity to re-imagine the design and use of public spaces with local partners. Students who take the course for 4 units will contribute to a final exhibition and expo at the end of the quarter. Enrollment by application only. Find more info and apply at dschool.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Chan, D. (PI)

URBANST 110: Introduction to Urban Studies

Designed for freshmen and sophomores. Introduction to the study of cities and urban civilization focusing on the utopias that have been produced over time to guide and inspire city-dwellers to improve and perfect their urban environments. History of urbanization and the urban planning theories inspired by Ebenezer Howard, Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, the New Urbanists and Smart Growth advocates that address current issues such as urban community dynamics, suburbanization, sustainability, and globalization. Public policy approaches designed to address these issues and utopian visions of what cities could be, or should be, in the future. Topic of the final paper chosen by the student, with consent of instructor, and may be a historical research paper, a policy-advocacy paper, or a proposal for an urban utopia that addresses the challenges and possibilities of urban life today.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

URBANST 122: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Coyne, B. (PI)

URBANST 123B: Approaching Research in the Community: Design and Methods (CSRE 146B)

(Taught concurrently with CSRE 146; you may enroll in either course.) This course focuses on issues of research design and how to select specific methodological strategies to assure ethical and effective partnership-based research. In this course, students will plan for their own participation in a CB(P)R project. Topical themes will include best practice strategies for (a) defining and selecting community problems or issues to be addressed, (b) generating relevant and useful research questions, (c) choosing specific means and methods for data collection [e.g., surveys, interviews, focus groups, etc.], (d) storing, organizing and analyzing data, (e) reflecting on and critiquing research findings, and (f) carrying out dissemination in ways that can be expected to enhance community power and advance community development. Students will be provided with opportunities to workshop their respective projects-in-development, (e.g., developing and sharing research questions, data collection instruments, strategies for engaging community constituents as co-researchers, etc.). This is a required course for students participating in the Haas Center for Public Service¿s Community-based Research Fellows Program, but enrollment is open to all Stanford students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hurd, C. (PI)

URBANST 141: Gentrification (CSRE 141)

Neighborhoods in the Bay Area and around the world are undergoing a transformation known as gentrification. Middle- and upper-income people are moving into what were once low-income areas, and housing costs are on the rise. Tensions between newcomers and old timers, who are often separated by race, ethnicity, or sexual orientation, can erupt; high rents may force long-time residents to leave. In this class we will move beyond simplistic media depictions to explore the complex history, nature, causes and consequences of this process. Students will learn through readings, films, class discussions, and engagement with a local community organization. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kahan, M. (PI)

URBANST 147: Archaeology of Human Rights (ANTHRO 112A)

This introductory seminar provides a critical vantage point about human rights discourse from an archaeological perspective. The seminar is organized around four main questions: (1) Is cultural heritage a human right? (2) What are archaeologists learning about how the material and temporal dimensions of power and resistance? (3) How is archaeological evidence being used in investigations of human rights violations? (4) Can research about the past shape the politics of the present? Topics to be discussed include archaeological research on mass internment, colonialism, enslavement and coerced labor, ethnic cleansing, homelessness, gender discrimination, indigenous rights, and environmental justice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Voss, B. (PI)

URBANST 148: Who Owns Your City?: Institutional Real Estate Seminar

A hands-on introductory seminar designed to allow students to understand and interact with all aspects of the realnnestate investment process, including property development, local government interplay, value creation, assetnnmanagement, financial analysis, and capital markets.nnCourse activities will include asset tours, case studies, and project deep dives.nnThis class is intended for all students looking to better understand real estate as an investment asset class and anncritical part of the modern global economy. Course material will be appropriate for students interested in a variety ofnndisciplines, including Urban Studies - history, design, government, or community interests; institutional investment,nninvestment banking/consulting, construction/engineering, and general finance/economics
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

URBANST 171: Urban Design Studio (CEE 131D)

The practical application of urban design theory. Projects focus on designing neighborhood and downtown regions to balance livability, revitalization, population growth, and historic preservation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Glanz, D. (PI)
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