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1 - 10 of 83 results for: ME

ME 21: Renaissance Machine Design

Preference to freshmen. Technological innovations of the 1400s that accompanied the proliferation of monumental art and architecture by Brunelleschi, da Vinci, and others who designed machines and invented novel construction, fresco, and bronze-casting techniques. The social and political climate, from the perspective of a machine designer, that made possible and demanded engineering expertise from prominent artists. Hands-on projectsto provide a physical understanding of Renaissance-era engineering challenges and introduce the pleasure of creative engineering design. Technical background not required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Cutkosky, M. (PI)

ME 22N: Smart Robots in our Mix: Collaborating in High Tech Environments of Tomorrow

This course invites students to explore rules of engagement in a global digitally interconnected world they will create with the robots in their society. The material will be taught in the context of ubiquitous integrated technology that will be part of their future reality. Human-robot interactions will be an integral part of future diverse teams. Students will explore what form will this interaction take as an emerging element of tomorrow's society, be it medical implanted technology or the implications of military use of robots and social media in future society. Students will learn to foster their creative confidence to explore collaboration by differences for social innovation in a digitally networked world.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Waldron, K. (PI)

ME 30: Engineering Thermodynamics

The basic principles of thermodynamics are introduced in this course. Concepts of energy and entropy from elementary considerations of the microscopic nature of matter are discussed. The principles are applied in thermodynamic analyses directed towards understanding the performances of engineering systems. Methods and problems cover socially responsible economic generation and utilization of energy in central power generation plants, solar systems, refrigeration devices, and automobile, jet and gas-turbine engines.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 70: Introductory Fluids Engineering

Elements of fluid mechanics as applied to engineering problems. Equations of motion for incompressible ideal flow. Hydrostatics. Control volume laws for mass, momentum, and energy. Bernoulli equation. Dimensional analysis and similarity. Flow in ducts. Boundary layer flows. Lift and drag. Lab experiment demonstrations. Prerequisites: ENGR 14 and 30.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 80: Mechanics of Materials

Mechanics of materials and deformation of structural members. Topics include stress and deformation analysis under axial loading, torsion and bending, column buckling and pressure vessels. Introduction to stress transformation and multiaxial loading. Prerequisite: ENGR 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 101: Visual Thinking

Lecture/lab. Visual thinking and language skills are developed and exercised in the context of solving design problems. Exercises for the mind's eye. Rapid visualization and prototyping with emphasis on fluent and flexible idea production. The relationship between visual thinking and the creative process. Limited enrollment, attendance at first class required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 103: Foundations of Product Realization

Students develop the language and toolset to transform design concepts into tangible models/prototypes that cultivate the emergence of mechanical aptitude. Visual communication tools such as sketching, orthographic projection, and 2D/3D design software are introduced in the context of design and prototyping assignments. Instruction and practice with hand, powered, and digital prototyping tools in the Product Realization Lab support students¿ implementation and iteration of physical project work. Project documentation, reflection, and in-class presentations are opportunities for students to find their design voice and practice sharing it with others.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 103D: Engineering Drawing and Design

Designed to accompany 203. The fundamentals of engineering drawing including orthographic projection, dimensioning, sectioning, exploded and auxiliary views, assembly drawings, and SolidWorks. Homework drawings are of parts fabricated by the student in the lab. Assignments in 203 supported by material in 103D and sequenced on the assumption that the student is enrolled in both courses simultaneously.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 104B: Designing Your Life

The course employs a design thinking approach to help students develop a point of view about their life and career. The course focuses on an introduction to design thinking, the integration of work and worldview, and practices that support vocation formation. Includes seminar-style discussions, role-playing, short writing assignments, guest speakers, and individual mentoring and coaching. Open to juniors, seniors and 5th year coterms, all majors. Additional course information at http://www.designingyourlife.org.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 104S: Designing Your Stanford (EDUC 118S)

DYS uses a Design Thinking approach to help Freshmen and Sophomores learn practical tools and ideas to make the most of their Stanford experience. Topics include the purpose of college, major selection, educational wayfinding, and innovating college outcomes - all applied through an introduction to Design Thinking. This seminar class incorporates small group discussion, in-class activities, field exercises, personal reflection, and individual coaching. Admission to be confirmed by email to Axess registered students prior to first class session. DYS uses a Design Thinking approach to help Freshmen and Sophomores learn practical tools and ideas to make the most of their Stanford experience. Topics include the purpose of college, major selection, educational wayfinding, and innovating college outcomes - all applied through an introduction to design mindsets and practices. This seminar class incorporates small group discussion, in-class activities, field exercises, personal reflection, and individual coaching. Additional course information at http://www.designingyourstanford.org.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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