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1 - 10 of 137 results for: LAW

LAW 224B: Federal Litigation: Methods and Practice

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It is an introductory course in the litigation process. Students represent the plaintiff or defendant in a simulated public interest case set in a federal district court that raises complex issues of federal civil procedure, privacy, and first amendment law. Students plan litigation strategy, draft pleadings, conduct discovery, write short briefs, and orally argue major motions for dismissal, class action certification, and preliminary injunctive relief. While developing students' written and oral advocacy skills, the course also focuses on substantive issues of civil procedure and constitutional law. Attendance, class participation and written assignments. This course is open to first-year Law School students only.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 400: Directed Research

Directed Research is an extraordinary opportunity for students beyond the first-year to research problems in any field of law. The final product must be embodied in a paper or other form of written work involving a substantial independent effort on the part of the student. A student must submit a detailed petition of at least 250 words, approved by the sponsoring faculty member, outlining his or her proposed project and demonstrating that the research is likely to result in a significant scholarly contribution. A petition will not be approved for work assigned or performed in a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has or will receive credit. A petition must indicate whether the product is intended for publication in a law review or elsewhere. A student may petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development" when the work involves assisting a Law School faculty member in developing concepts or materials for new and innovative law school courses. Both the supervising more »
Directed Research is an extraordinary opportunity for students beyond the first-year to research problems in any field of law. The final product must be embodied in a paper or other form of written work involving a substantial independent effort on the part of the student. A student must submit a detailed petition of at least 250 words, approved by the sponsoring faculty member, outlining his or her proposed project and demonstrating that the research is likely to result in a significant scholarly contribution. A petition will not be approved for work assigned or performed in a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has or will receive credit. A petition must indicate whether the product is intended for publication in a law review or elsewhere. A student may petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development" when the work involves assisting a Law School faculty member in developing concepts or materials for new and innovative law school courses. Both the supervising faculty member and the Associate Dean for Curriculum must approve petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development." Students must meet with the instructor frequently for the purposes of report and guidance. Unit credit is by arrangement. Students whose projects warrant more than four units should consider a Senior Thesis or the Research Track. See SLS Student Handbook for requirements and limitations. With the approval of the instructor, a directed research project of two-units or more may satisfy one research writing course (R course). Elements used in grading: As agreed to by instructor. Directed Research petitions are available on the Law School Registrar's Office website (see Forms and Petitions).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 403: Senior Thesis

An opportunity for third-year students to engage in original research and to prepare a substantial written-work product on the scale of a law review article. The thesis topic should be chosen no later than two weeks after the beginning of the seventh term of law study and may be chosen during the sixth term. The topic is subject to the approval of the thesis supervisor, who may be any member of the Law School faculty under whose direction the student wishes to write the thesis and who is willing to assume the responsibility therefor. An oral defense of the thesis before members of the faculty, including the thesis supervisor, will be conducted late in the student's ninth academic term. Acceptance of the thesis for credit requires the approval of the thesis supervisor and one or more other members of the faculty who will be selected by the supervisor. Satisfactory completion of the senior thesis will satisfy graduation requirements to the extent of (a) 5 - 8 units of credit and (b) two research courses. The exact requirements for a senior thesis are in the discretion of the supervising faculty member. Special Instructions: Two Research credits are possible. Elements Used in Grading: Paper
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 406: Research Track

The Research Track is for students who wish to carry out a research project of a scope larger than that contemplated for a Senior Thesis. Research Track projects are to be supervised by two or more professors, at least one of whom must be a member of the Law School faculty. At least one faculty member in addition to the supervisors must read the written product of the research, and the student must defend the written work orally before the readers. Students will be admitted to Research Track only if they have a demonstrated capability for substantial independent research, and propose a significant and well-formulated project at the time of application. Special Instructions: Two Research credits are possible. Elements Used in Grading: Paper
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 9-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 411: Directed Writing

Teams of students may earn "Directed Writing" credit for collaborative problems involving professional writing, such as briefs, proposed legislation or other legal writing. Only projects supervised by a member of the faculty (tenured, tenure-track, senior lecturer, or professor from practice) may qualify for Directed Writing credit. It will not necessarily be appropriate to require each member of the team to write the number of pages that would be required for an individual directed research project earning the number of units that each team member will earn for the team project. The page length guidelines applicable to individual papers may be considered in determining the appropriate page length, but the faculty supervisor has discretion to make the final page-length determination. Students must meet with the instructor frequently for the purposes of report and guidance. Unit credit is by arrangement. A petition will not be approved for work assigned or performed in a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has or will receive credit. Special Instructions: A Directed Writing project may not count as the equivalent of a "PW" (Professional Writing) course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 681C: Group Behavior

This discussion group will look at how ethical choices are shaped by organizational and group cultures. We'll read about some famous psychological experiments such as the Milgram and Zimbardo experiments; and some studies of decisions made in corporate organizations, government bureaucracies, and a battalion of ordinary middle-class Germans tasked with hunting down Jews; and talk about what insights from this work may be relevant to lawyers' ethics and working lives. Begin in Winter Quarter and run through Spring Quarter. Meeting Time: Wednesdays, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Meeting Dates: TBD. DISCUSSIONS IN ETHICAL & PROFESSIONAL VALUES COURSES RANKING FORM: To apply for this course, 2L, 3L and Advanced Degree students must complete and submit a Ranking Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Elements used in grading: Class attendance at all sessions and class participation.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: Gordon, R. (PI)

LAW 682D: Science and the Law

In an attempt to reach "correct," justified outcomes, areas of the law ranging from criminal justice to toxic torts look to science as a source of disinterested, objective fact. But while science is indeed at its heart a search for objective truths about the world, the incorporation of scientific results into legal institutions is often both fraught and unsatisfying. Problems may arise due to a misunderstanding of the underlying science by lawyers and judges, different norms in the legal and scientific worlds, or even for the simple reason that scientific results are not immutable but rather are often subject to reinterpretation and refinement. In this discussion group, we will explore a range of questions at the intersection of science and law. We will discuss how scientists reach consensus on the interpretation of research results, including the role of peer review and whether science is beset by a ¿replication crisis.¿ We will compare how different legal processes incorporate scient more »
In an attempt to reach "correct," justified outcomes, areas of the law ranging from criminal justice to toxic torts look to science as a source of disinterested, objective fact. But while science is indeed at its heart a search for objective truths about the world, the incorporation of scientific results into legal institutions is often both fraught and unsatisfying. Problems may arise due to a misunderstanding of the underlying science by lawyers and judges, different norms in the legal and scientific worlds, or even for the simple reason that scientific results are not immutable but rather are often subject to reinterpretation and refinement. In this discussion group, we will explore a range of questions at the intersection of science and law. We will discuss how scientists reach consensus on the interpretation of research results, including the role of peer review and whether science is beset by a ¿replication crisis.¿ We will compare how different legal processes incorporate scientific findings, ranging from active solicitation of expert input to independent research by legal decisionmakers. And, most importantly, we will discuss where and how these processes go wrong, and how communication from scientists to lawyers and policymakers might be improved. Spring Quarter. Class meeting dates: Five Mondays from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. DISCUSSIONS IN ETHICAL & PROFESSIONAL VALUES COURSES RANKING FORM: To apply for this course, 2L, 3L and Advanced Degree students must complete and submit a Ranking Form available on the SLS website (click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Elements used in grading: Attendance at all sessions and participation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

LAW 682E: Tocqueville's Democracy in America

The young Frenchman Alexis de Tocqueville traveled extensively in the Jacksonian America of the 1830s, and wrote a two-volume book based on his observations. Widely regarded as the most perceptive commentary ever written on the character of the American republic, it deals with the social preconditions for democracy, issues of religion, race, and gender, the conflict between freedom and equality, and the potential danger of soft despotism. The assigned readings will be excerpts from the book. We will meet five Tuesday evenings during winter and spring quarters, from 6:30 to 9:00, at my home. Precise dates will be determined in consultation with the class. We will begin each session with an informal dinner at 6:30, leaving about two hours for discussion. I will ask two students to lead the discussion each session. Enrollment will be limited to eight students. DISCUSSIONS IN ETHICAL & PROFESSIONAL VALUES COURSES RANKING FORM: To apply for this course, 2L, 3L and Advanced Degree students m more »
The young Frenchman Alexis de Tocqueville traveled extensively in the Jacksonian America of the 1830s, and wrote a two-volume book based on his observations. Widely regarded as the most perceptive commentary ever written on the character of the American republic, it deals with the social preconditions for democracy, issues of religion, race, and gender, the conflict between freedom and equality, and the potential danger of soft despotism. The assigned readings will be excerpts from the book. We will meet five Tuesday evenings during winter and spring quarters, from 6:30 to 9:00, at my home. Precise dates will be determined in consultation with the class. We will begin each session with an informal dinner at 6:30, leaving about two hours for discussion. I will ask two students to lead the discussion each session. Enrollment will be limited to eight students. DISCUSSIONS IN ETHICAL & PROFESSIONAL VALUES COURSES RANKING FORM: To apply for this course, 2L, 3L and Advanced Degree students must complete and submit a Ranking Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Elements used in grading: Class attendance at all sessions and class participation.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

LAW 802: TGR: Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR

LAW 805F: Policy Practicum: Endstage Decisions

(Formerly Law 413Z) Medical decisions toward the end of life can be crucial and difficult for patients, doctors, and families. Law and medicine have been struggling to find ways to strike a balance between what the patients might want (or say they want), and what makes medical, economic, and ethical sense. One standard is the "Advanced Health Care Directive" (Directive), which guides doctors and surrogates (usually a family member) on what to do when faced with end-of-life dilemmas. Another form, adopted in just over half the states (including California) is the POLST (Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment). The two types are supposed to complement each other, but they are different in important ways. The Advanced Health Care Directive expresses what a person wants and/or appoints a surrogate in case the patient is unable to express her wishes. Anybody can fill out a Directive, at any time of life. Ideally, a copy goes to the surrogate, if one is appointed, and another to the more »
(Formerly Law 413Z) Medical decisions toward the end of life can be crucial and difficult for patients, doctors, and families. Law and medicine have been struggling to find ways to strike a balance between what the patients might want (or say they want), and what makes medical, economic, and ethical sense. One standard is the "Advanced Health Care Directive" (Directive), which guides doctors and surrogates (usually a family member) on what to do when faced with end-of-life dilemmas. Another form, adopted in just over half the states (including California) is the POLST (Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment). The two types are supposed to complement each other, but they are different in important ways. The Advanced Health Care Directive expresses what a person wants and/or appoints a surrogate in case the patient is unable to express her wishes. Anybody can fill out a Directive, at any time of life. Ideally, a copy goes to the surrogate, if one is appointed, and another to the primary care physician. The POLST form is meant for people who are seriously ill. The Directive (for example "no artificial nutrition by tube") is supposed to be controlling; the patient, of course, can change her mind; but there is no surrogate. It is an agreement between the patient and the doctor. Who uses these different forms? How effective are they? To what extent and in what situations are they useful? Working closely with Stanford Hospital as the client, students will not only look at current literature on the topic and build on past practicum research, but also conduct interviews with doctors, nurses, and other health care specialists with the goal of finding out what local hospitals and nursing homes are doing. The aim is to get a more realistic picture of the what one might call the living law of the Directive and the POLST. The ultimate goal is policy recommendations to improve the forms and associated laws and to examine alternative approaches. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Final Paper. -- NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
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