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1 - 10 of 14 results for: ARCHLGY

ARCHLGY 21Q: Eight Great Archaeological Sites in Europe (CLASSICS 21Q)

(Formerly CLASSART 21Q.) Preference to sophomores. Focus is on excavation, features and finds, arguments over interpretation, and the place of each site in understanding the archaeological history of Europe. Goal is to introduce the latest archaeological and anthropological thought, and raise key questions about ancient society. The archaeological perspective foregrounds interdisciplinary study: geophysics articulated with art history, source criticism with analytic modeling, statistics interpretation. A web site with resources about each site, including plans, photographs, video, and publications, is the basis for exploring.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Shanks, M. (PI)

ARCHLGY 51: Introduction to Greek Archaeology (CLASSICS 51)

An introduction to the archaeology of ancient Greece, from the first city states through the cultural achievements of classical Athens to the conquest by Rome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shanks, M. (PI)

ARCHLGY 97: Archaeology Internship

Opportunity for students to pursue their specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, museums or government agency. May be repeated for credit. Prior instructor consent needed.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARCHLGY 110: Environmental Archaeology (ANTHRO 110, ANTHRO 210)

This course investigates the field of environmental archaeology. Its goals are twofold: 1) to critically consider the intellectual histories of environmental archaeology, and, 2) to survey the various techniques and methods by which archaeologists assess historical environmental conditions through material proxies. The course will include lab activities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Bauer, A. (PI)

ARCHLGY 125: ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD SURVEY METHODS

Practicum applying a variety of survey techniques to discover, map, and record archaeological sites. Basic cartographic skills for archaeologists and an introduction to GIS tools, GPS instruments, and geophysical techniques. Participants should be able to walk 3 - 4 miles over uneven terrain or make special arrangements with the instructor for transportation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jones, L. (PI)

ARCHLGY 136: Artifacts in the Atomic Age: Isotopes in Archaeology

Advances in material science over the 20th and 21st centuries have greatly expanded archaeologists' tool-kit for studying the material remains of the past. In particular, isotopic chemistry has come to play an important role in answering questions of prime importance to archaeological research: How old is this artifact? Where did it come from? What did people and animals eat in the past? How did humans and animals move in the landscape? In this course, we will explore a variety of methods that use isotopic chemistry to answer anthropological questions about human lives in the past. The course will provide a background in the science of isotopic abundance and fractionation in natural and technological systems. It will also investigate wide variety of archaeological case studies that use chemistry to explore topics of anthropological interest, including: migration, technology, social inequality, food & nutrition, human-animal interactions, and human-environment interactions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Chazin, H. (PI)

ARCHLGY 156: Design of Cities (CLASSICS 156)

Long-term, comparative and archaeological view of urban planning and design. Cities are the fastest changing components of the human landscape and are challenging our relationships with nature. They are the historical loci of innovation and change, are cultural hotspots, and present a tremendous challenge through growth, industrial development, the consumption of goods and materials. We will unpack such topics by tracking the genealogy of qualities of life in the ancient Near Eastern city states and those of Graeco-Roman antiquity, with reference also to prehistoric built environments and cities in the Indus Valley and through the Americas. The class takes an explicitly human-centered view of urban design and one that emphasizes long term processes.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shanks, M. (PI)

ARCHLGY 165: Roman Gladiators (CLASSICS 164)

In modern America, gladiators are powerful representatives of ancient Rome (Spartacus, Gladiator). In the Roman world, gladiators were mostly slaves and reviled, barred from certain positions in society and doomed to short and dangerous lives. A first goal of this course is to analyze Roman society not from the top down, from the perspective of politicians, generals and the literary elite, but from the bottom up, from the perspective of gladiators and the ordinary people in the stands. A second goal is to learn how work with very different kinds of evidence: bone injuries, ancient weapons, gladiator burials, laws, graffiti written by gladiators or their fans, visual images of gladiatorial combats, and the intricate architecture and social control of the amphitheater. A final goal is to think critically about modern ideas of Roman ¿bloodthirst.¿ Are these ideas justified, given the ancient evidence?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 173: Heritage Institutions Inside Out: The Power of Bureaucracies

Anyone interested in how objects, places and customs become heritage should be interested in bureaucracies. Given that dealing with bureaucratic procedures often cause something of an allergic reaction among people, heritage researchers included, it is perhaps no wonder that they have long been neglected as acts of heritage-making; considered less attractive research subjects than archaeological field ventures, World Heritage sites and grass root heritage communities. Yet it is precisely in the everyday practices of regional, national and international bureaucracies in the administrative tasks, paper shuffling and decisions taken across shiny tables that much of the power to define, select and configure the values of heritage lie. nThe main task of this course is to introduce bureaucracies as agents in sustaining and producing heritage regimes, and to discuss how to go about the study of such institutions. Drawing on the research of an emergent group of scholars dealing with UNESCO, th more »
Anyone interested in how objects, places and customs become heritage should be interested in bureaucracies. Given that dealing with bureaucratic procedures often cause something of an allergic reaction among people, heritage researchers included, it is perhaps no wonder that they have long been neglected as acts of heritage-making; considered less attractive research subjects than archaeological field ventures, World Heritage sites and grass root heritage communities. Yet it is precisely in the everyday practices of regional, national and international bureaucracies in the administrative tasks, paper shuffling and decisions taken across shiny tables that much of the power to define, select and configure the values of heritage lie. nThe main task of this course is to introduce bureaucracies as agents in sustaining and producing heritage regimes, and to discuss how to go about the study of such institutions. Drawing on the research of an emergent group of scholars dealing with UNESCO, the European Union, international corporations and national governments, the first set of seminars will explore the logics of Western bureaucracy and discuss specific examples relating to heritage. The second set of seminars will discuss some methods and analytical approaches to studying heritage bureaucracies, particularly ethnography and Actor Network Theory. Leaning on contemporary research in political anthropology, the points and pitfalls of document analysis, participant observation and interviewing will be covered, as will the challenges of analyzing such knowledge and turning it into academic text.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 190: Archaeology Directed Reading/Independent Study

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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