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1 - 10 of 15 results for: VPGE::Personal ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

ENGR 311B: Designing the Professional

How to Get a Life as well as a PhD: Seminar open to ALL doctoral students (Humanities, Sciences and Engineering). Apply principles of design thinking to designing your professional life following Stanford. Topics include: Introduction to "design thinking", a framework for vocational wayfinding and locating profession within life overall; tools to investigate multiple professional paths. Creation of personal "Odyssey Plan" to innovate multiple prototypes for post-PhD professional launch.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ETHICSOC 278M: Introduction to Environmental Ethics (ETHICSOC 178M, PHIL 178M, PHIL 278M, POLISCI 134L)

How should human beings relate to the natural world? Do we have moral obligations toward non-human animals and other parts of nature? And what do we owe to other human beings, including future generations, with respect to the environment? The first part of this course will examine such questions in light of some of our current ethical theories: considering what those theories suggest regarding the extent and nature of our environmental obligations; and also whether reflection on such obligations can prove informative about the adequacy of our ethical theories. In the second part of the course, we will use the tools that we have acquired to tackle various ethical questions that confront us in our dealings with the natural world, looking at subjects such as: animal rights; conservation; economic approaches to the environment; access to and control over natural resources; environmental justice and pollution; climate change; technology and the environment; and environmental activism.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMSCI 201: Graduate Environment of Support

Psychosocial, financial, and career issues in adapting graduate students to Stanford; how these issues relate to diversity, resources, policies, and procedures. Discussions among faculty, advanced graduate students, campus resource people, and the dean's office. (Thomas)
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Thomas, A. (PI)

LAWGEN 115N: Human Rights Advocacy

What are the origins of the human rights movement and where is it headed? What does it mean to be a human rights activist? What are the main challenges and dilemmas facing those engaged in human rights advocacy? In the space of sixty years, human rights advocates have transformed a marginal utopian ideal into a central element of global discussion, if not practice. In this seminar we will examine the actors and organizations behind this remarkable development as well as the vast challenges faced by advocates in the recent past and today. Together, we will learn to be critical of, as well as to think, and act, like human rights advocates. This seminar will introduce you to some the main debates and dilemmas within the human rights movement. We will consider and understand the differing agendas of western international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) and their counterparts in the frequently non-western) developing world, as well as tensions between and among rights advocates along other important dimensions (civil and political vs. economic, social and cultural rights; rights promotion through engagement of powerful actors vs. challenging structures of power, etc.). The seminar seeks to develop your ability: 1) to understand human rights and social justice issues as contested political, legal and cultural phenomena; 2) to review advocacy texts, videos and other interventions critically; 3) to appreciate the political dimensions of efforts to promote human rights; 4) to understand how recent history constrains and structures options and possibilities for social intervention to promote rights and justice. During the course of the quarter you will be required to submit several short reflection papers and develop a human rights advocacy campaign.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 366: Creative Gym: A Design Thinking Skills Studio

Build your creative confidence and sharpen your design thinking skills. Train your intuition and expand the design context from which you operate every day. This experimental studio will introduce d.school students to fast- paced experiential exercises that lay the mental and physical foundation for a potent bias toward action, and a wider knowledge of the personal skills that expert design thinkers utilize in all phases of their process. Recent research based on this course curriculum show that performing these class activities will expand your creative capacity in statistically significant ways.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ME 379: Fail Faster

Fail Faster will dive deeply into one of design thinking's key tenets: Fail early, fail often. Students will explore ways to: [1] become comfortable with uncertainty, [2] develop tools to navigate situations of failure, and [3] learn to turn failures into opportunities. This exercised-based workshop will examine the physiological impact of failure and practice the psychological traits and the power of resilience through hands-on activities. Participants will acquire techniques to help them navigate, bounce back, grow and even flourish in the face of their failures.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MS&E 277: Creativity and Innovation

Experiential course explores factors that promote and inhibit creativity and innovation in individuals, teams, and organizations. Teaches creativity tools using workshops, case studies, field trips, expert guests, and team design challenges. Enrollment limited to 40. Admission by application. See http://dschool.stanford.edu/classes.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MS&E 271: Global Entrepreneurial Marketing

Skills needed to market new technology-based products to customers around the world. Case method discussions. Cases include startups and global high tech firms. Course themes: marketing toolkit, targeting markets and customers, product marketing and management, partners and distribution, sales and negotiation, and outbound marketing. Team-based take-home final exam. Limited enrollment. Admission by application.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MS&E 274: Dynamic Entrepreneurial Strategy

Primarily for graduate students. How entrepreneurial strategy focuses on creating structural change or responding to change induced externally. Grabber-holder dynamics as an analytical framework for developing entrepreneurial strategy to increase success in creating and shaping the diffusion of new technology or product innovation dynamics. Topics: First mover versus follower advantage in an emerging market; latecomer advantage and strategy in a mature market; strategy to break through stagnation; and strategy to turn danger into opportunity. Modeling, case studies, and term project.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Tse, E. (PI)
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