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CEE 32A: Psychology of Architecture

This course argues that architecture often neglects the interdisciplinary investigation of our internal psychological experience and the way it impacts our creation of space. How does our inner life influence external design? How are we impacted emotionally, physically, psychologically by the spaces we inhabit day to day? How might we intentionally imbue personal and public spaces with specific emotions? This seminar serves as a call to action for students interested in approaching architecture with a holistic understanding of the emotional impact of space. Sample topics addressed will include: conscious vs. unconscious design; the ego of architecture; psycho-spatial perspectives; ideas of home; integral/holistic architecture; phenomenology of inner and outer spaces; exploring archetypal architecture; and translating emotion through environment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 130: Architectural Design: 3-D Modeling, Methodology, and Process

Preference to Architectural Design majors; others by consent of instructor. Projects investigate conceptual approaches to the design of key architectural elements, such as wall and roof. Functional and structural considerations. Focus is on constructing 3-D models in a range of materials; 3-D computer modeling. Students keep a graphic account of the evolution of their design process. Final project entails design of a simple structure. Limited enrollment. Pre- or corequisite: CEE 31 or 31Q.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Debbas, C. (PI)

CEE 131D: Urban Design Studio (URBANST 171)

The practical application of urban design theory. Projects focus on designing neighborhood and downtown regions to balance livability, revitalization, population growth, and historic preservation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Glanz, D. (PI)

CHEMENG 12SC: An Exploration of Art Materials: The Intersection of Art and Science

There is growing interest in the intersection of art and science, whether from artists adapting technology to suit their visions or from scientists and engineers seeking to explain various visual effects. To take advantage of possible creative sparks at the art/science interface, it is necessary for fuzzies and techies to have some knowledge of the language used by the other side. This interface will be explored through examining approaches used by an artist and an engineer in the context of the materials science of cultural objects. In-class lectures, hands-on studio practice, and field trips will be used to illustrate these different perspectives. At the heart of the scientific approach is the notion that a cultural object, e.g., a painting, is a physical entity comprising materials with different physical properties and different responses to environmental stresses presented by light, heat, and water. In support of this outlook, in-class lectures and discussions will focus on the ba more »
There is growing interest in the intersection of art and science, whether from artists adapting technology to suit their visions or from scientists and engineers seeking to explain various visual effects. To take advantage of possible creative sparks at the art/science interface, it is necessary for fuzzies and techies to have some knowledge of the language used by the other side. This interface will be explored through examining approaches used by an artist and an engineer in the context of the materials science of cultural objects. In-class lectures, hands-on studio practice, and field trips will be used to illustrate these different perspectives. At the heart of the scientific approach is the notion that a cultural object, e.g., a painting, is a physical entity comprising materials with different physical properties and different responses to environmental stresses presented by light, heat, and water. In support of this outlook, in-class lectures and discussions will focus on the basic concepts of color, optics, mechanics, composite structures, and response of the object to environmental stress, and we will visit Bay Area museums to see how artists employ such techniques. The hands-on studio experience is designed to increase students' confidence and develop their appreciation of differences in materials. It is not necessary to have any artistic training, only a willingness to experiment. The in-class studio projects will include working with line and shadow; color, binders, and mordants; global sources of pigments; substrates and writing; and material failure. Students will make one technical presentation on a topic in one of the five areas relevant to a painting: color, optics, mechanics, composites, and stress response. In addition, they will prepare one essay on the issues surrounding the intersection of art and science. Finally, they will complete a project related to one of the thematic areas covered in the hands-on studio sessions and make a final oral presentation describing their project.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CLASSICS 16N: Sappho: Erotic Poetess of Lesbos (FEMGEN 24N)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 24N.) Preference to freshmen. Sappho's surviving fragments in English; traditions referring to or fantasizing about her disputed life. How her poetry and legend inspired women authors and male poets such as Swinburne, Baudelaire, and Pound. Paintings inspired by Sappho in ancient and modern times, and composers who put her poetry to music.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Peponi, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 19N: Eloquence Personified: How To Speak Like Cicero

This course is an introduction to Roman rhetoric, Cicero's Rome, and the active practice of speaking well. Participants read a short rhetorical treatise by Cicero, analyze one of his speeches as well as more recent ones by, e.g., Kennedy, Martin Luther King Jr., and Obama, and watch their oratorical performances. During the remainder of the term they practice rhetoric, prepare and deliver in class two (short) speeches, and write an essay.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Krebs, C. (PI)

COMM 104W: Reporting, Writing, and Understanding the News

Techniques of news reporting and writing. The value and role of news in democratic societies. Gateway class to journalism. Prerequisite for all COMM 177/277 classes. Limited enrollment. Preference to COMM majors.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 171: Moving Pictures: Video Journalism for mobile and social platforms (COMM 271)

(Graduate students register for 271.) Examine video journalism¿s crucial role in digital news media across mobile and social media platforms. What are the specific needs of mobile platforms? How is new technology utilized to produce effective video news content? We'll examine case studies and hear from guest speakers about innovations in video journalism. Students produce short video journalism pieces using mobile tools, optimized for viewing on mobile devices. Prerequisite: Journalism MA student or instructor's consent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 176: Advanced Digital Media Production (COMM 276)

In-depth reporting and production using audio, images and video. Focus on an in-depth journalism project with appropriate uses of digital media: audio, photography, graphics, and video. Topics include advanced field techniques and approaches (audio, video, still) and emphasis on creating a non-fiction narrative arc in a multimedia piece of 10-12 minutes. Prerequisite: COMM 275 or consent of instructor
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 177D: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Narrative Journalism (COMM 277D)

(Graduate students register for COMM 277D.) How to report, write, edit, and read long-form narrative nonfiction, whether for magazines, news sites or online venues. Tools and templates of story telling such as scenes, characters, dialogue, and narrative arc. How the best long-form narrative stories defy or subvert conventional wisdom and bring fresh light to the human experience through reporting, writing, and moral passion. Prerequisite: 104 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Chase, M. (PI)
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