2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

121 - 130 of 135 results for: AMSTUD

AMSTUD 260: Disability, Gender, and Identity: Women's Personal Experiences (FEMGEN 260, FEMGEN 360)

This course explores visible and invisible disabilities, focusing on issues of gender and identity in the personal experiences of women. The course emphasizes psychological as well as physical health, the diversity of disability experiences, self-labeling, caretaking, stigma and passing, and social and political aspects. Disabilities covered include blindness, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, arthritis, emotional and learning disabilities, and conditions requiring wheelchairs and other forms of assistance. The readings draw from the disability studies literature and emphasize women's personal narratives in sociological perspective. Note: Instructor Consent Required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Krieger, S. (PI)

AMSTUD 261A: Geography, Time, and Trauma in Asian American Literature (ASNAMST 187)

The notion that homes can be stable locations for cultural, racial, ethnic, and similarly situated identity categories. Tthe possibility that there really is no place like home for Asian American subjects. How geography, landscape, and time situate traumas within fictional Asian American narratives.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AMSTUD 261E: Mixed Race Literature in the U.S. and South Africa (AFRICAAM 261E)

As scholar Werner Sollors recently suggested, novels, poems, stories about interracial contacts and mixed race constitute ¿an orphan literature belonging to no clear ethnic or national tradition.¿ Yet the theme of mixed race is at the center of many national self-definitions, even in our U.S. post-Civil Rights and South Africa¿s post-Apartheid era. This course examines aesthetic engagements with mixed race politics in these trans- and post-national dialogues, beginning in the 1700s and focusing on the 20th and 21st centuries.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AMSTUD 262C: African American Literature and the Retreat of Jim Crow (AFRICAAM 262C, CSRE 262C)

After the unprecedented carnage of WWII, the postwar era witnessed the slow decline of the segregated Jim Crow order and the onset of landmark civil rights legislation. What role did African American literature and culture play in this historical process? What does this shift in racial theory and praxis mean for black literary production, a tradition constituted by the experience of slavery and racial oppression? Focus on these questions against the backdrop of contemporaneous developments: the onset of the Cold War, decolonization and the formation of the Third World, and the emergence of the "new liberalism.".
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AMSTUD 262D: African American Poetics (AFRICAAM 262D)

Examination of African American poetic expressive forms from the 1700s to the 2000s, considering the central role of the genre--from sonnets to spoken word, from blues poetry to new media performance--in defining an evolving literary tradition and cultural identity.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AMSTUD 265: Writing Asian American History (ASNAMST 265, HISTORY 265, HISTORY 365)

Recent scholarship in Asian American history, with attention to methodologies and sources. Topics: racial ideologies, gender, transnationalism, culture, and Asian American art history. Primary research paper.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AMSTUD 267E: Martin Luther King, Jr. - His Life, Ideas, and Legacy (AFRICAAM 267E, HISTORY 267E)

Using the unique documentary resources and publications of Stanford's King Research and Education Institute, this course will provide a general introduction to King's life, visionary ideas, and historical significance. In addition to lectures and discussions, the course will include presentations of documentaries such as Eyes on the Prize. Students will be expected to read the required texts, participate in class discussions, and submit a research paper or an audio-visual project developed in consultation with the professor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AMSTUD 271: Mexicans in the United States (CHILATST 171, CSRE 171H, HISTORY 271)

This course explores the lives and experiences of Mexicans living in the United States, from 1848 to the present. Themes and topics include: the legacies of colonialism, the Mexican-American War, transnational migration, the effects of economic stratification, race and racialization, and the impact of sexual and gender ideologies on the lives of Mexicans residing north of the border.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AMSTUD 272E: Theories of Citizenship and Sovereignty in a Transnational Context (CHILATST 172, CSRE 172H, FEMGEN 272E, HISTORY 272E, HISTORY 372E)

This course explores the multiple meanings of citizenship and the ways in which they change when examined using different geographic scales (from the local to the transnational). The course will pair theoretical readings on citizenship with case studies that focus on North America. Topics include: definitions of citizenship; the interrelation of ideas of citizenship with those of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality; the relationship between sovereignty and territoriality; human and civil rights; and immigration.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AMSTUD 275B: History of Modern Mexico (CHILATST 275B, CSRE 275B, HISTORY 275B, HISTORY 375C)

Surveys the history of governance, resistance, and identity formation in Mexico from the nineteenth century to the present. Explores Mexico's historical struggles to achieve political stability, economic prosperity, and social justice and examines how regional, class, ethnic, and gender differences have figured prominently in the shaping of Mexican affairs. Topics include Mexico's wars and their legacies, the power of the state, violence and protest, debates over the meaning of "Mexicanness," youth culture, and the politics of indigenismo.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints