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21 - 30 of 33 results for: CARDCOURSES::general ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

POLISCI 236: Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector (ETHICSOC 232T, POLISCI 236S)

What is the basis of private action for the public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in a modern democracy? In the ¿Philanthropy Lab¿ component of the course, students will award $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits. Students will explore how nonprofit organizations operate domestically and globally as well as the historical development and modern structure of civil society and philanthropy. Readings in political philosophy, history, political sociology, and public policy. WIM for PoliSci students who enroll in PoliSci 236S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sievers, B. (PI)

POLISCI 236S: Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector (ETHICSOC 232T, POLISCI 236)

What is the basis of private action for the public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in a modern democracy? In the ¿Philanthropy Lab¿ component of the course, students will award $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits. Students will explore how nonprofit organizations operate domestically and globally as well as the historical development and modern structure of civil society and philanthropy. Readings in political philosophy, history, political sociology, and public policy. WIM for PoliSci students who enroll in PoliSci 236S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sievers, B. (PI)

PSYCH 7N: Learn to Intervene, Wisely

Do you ever look around and see ways that the world could be a better place, especially if people behaved a little differently? Do you wonder what prevents better outcomes? nnIn this seminar, we will examine social-psychological processes that lie behind diverse social problems, especially how people make sense of themselves, other people, or important situations, sometimes in pejorative ways that undermine outcomes. Then we will examine interventions that address critical processes to promote human flourishing. You¿ll have the opportunity to read and discuss classic and contemporary ¿wise¿ psychological interventions such as: how a change in the sign on a hospital soap dispenser can increase soap use; how a change in survey items can raise voter turnout; how a change in a single question can improve dating relationships; and how reading-and-writing exercises that address students¿ beliefs about intelligence and belonging in school can improve achievement years into the future. In lear more »
Do you ever look around and see ways that the world could be a better place, especially if people behaved a little differently? Do you wonder what prevents better outcomes? nnIn this seminar, we will examine social-psychological processes that lie behind diverse social problems, especially how people make sense of themselves, other people, or important situations, sometimes in pejorative ways that undermine outcomes. Then we will examine interventions that address critical processes to promote human flourishing. You¿ll have the opportunity to read and discuss classic and contemporary ¿wise¿ psychological interventions such as: how a change in the sign on a hospital soap dispenser can increase soap use; how a change in survey items can raise voter turnout; how a change in a single question can improve dating relationships; and how reading-and-writing exercises that address students¿ beliefs about intelligence and belonging in school can improve achievement years into the future. In learning about this research, you will discover more about psychological processes, how basic research helps clarify these processes, how they contribute in complex field settings to social problems, and how they can be altered.nnAs you learn from past research, you¿ll have the opportunity to design your very own ¿wise intervention¿ and to workshop others¿ efforts. You will identify a social problem on campus of interest to you, say: How can you reduce waste in the cafeteria? How can you get more people to take the stairs? How can you get people to hold more inclusive attitudes? Then you will identify a psychological process you think contributes to this problem, implement an intervention in the field and track the results. nnWhen you have completed this seminar, you will more fully understand the psychological aspect of social problems and how this can be addressed through rigorous research.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Walton, G. (PI)

PSYCH 150B: RACE AND CRIME PRACTICUM (CSRE 150B)

This practicum is designed to build on the lessons learned in Psych 150: Race & Crime. In this community service learning course, students will participate in community partnerships relevant to race and crime, as well as reflection to connect these experiences to research and course content. Interested students should complete an application for permission at: https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3. nnPrerequisite: Psych 150 (taken concurrently or previously).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 200A: Senior Practicum

Small student teams conduct policy analyses requested by government and nonprofit organizations. With guidance from the instructor and client organization, each team researches a real-world problem and devises implementable policy recommendations to help address it. The project culminates in a professional report and presentation to the client organization. Prerequisites: core courses in Public Policy or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Litvak, L. (PI)

PUBLPOL 200B: Senior Practicum

Small student teams conduct policy analyses requested by government and nonprofit organizations. With guidance from the instructor and client organization, each team researches a real-world problem and devises implementable policy recommendations to help address it. The project culminates in a professional report and presentation to the client organization. Prerequisites: core courses in Public Policy or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hehmeyer, P. (PI)

PUBLPOL 200C: Senior Practicum

Small student teams conduct policy analyses requested by government and nonprofit organizations. With guidance from the instructor and client organization, each team researches a real-world problem and devises implementable policy recommendations to help address it. The project culminates in a professional report and presentation to the client organization. Prerequisites: core courses in Public Policy or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Ajami, N. (PI)

PWR 2CR: Writing & Rhetoric 2: Communicating Science to the Public

As scientific knowledge and technology grow increasingly complex, the ability to explain science clearly and articulate science-based arguments to public audiences becomes more crucial, and more in demand. In this class, we will explore what makes written, spoken, and visual communication of science effective, compare the conventions of scholarly writing in the sciences to rhetorical strategies employed by popular science writers, and analyze problems with coverage of scientifically based issues in popular media and the promise and pitfalls of data visualization in conveying scientific information. For more information about PWR 2, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-2. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Ross, C. (PI)

SPANLANG 12SL: Spanlang 12SL Second-Year: Empahasis on Service Learning, second qtr

Continuation of SPANLANG 11. Identity and community. Sequence integrating community engagd learning, culture and language with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, community and academic contexts. SL content focuses on artistic projects with Spanish-speaking youth organizations in the local community. May require additional hours off campus immediately before and after class, in addition to regular class time. Projects may vary from quarter to quarter (e.g., mural art, environmental projects, poetry, etc.) but focus on themes surrounding community and youth identity. Cardinal Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 11C, 11R, or 11SL.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SPANLANG 101: The Structure of Spanish

Criteria and skills to analyze Spanish grammatical structure. Identification of word functions in sentences and texts, types of sentences, and terminology. Structure of nouns, adjectives, and verbs, and their relationship with meaning. The differences between Spanish grammar as a formal system and in everyday life.Students who wish to participate in the optional community engaged learning component should sign up for Spanlang 101SL (below). Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13C, SPANLANG 13R, SPANLANG 13SL, or SPANLANG 23B.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Language | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Miano, A. (PI)
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