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51 - 60 of 70 results for: VPGE::Leadership ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

MS&E 489: d.Leadership: Design Leadership in Context (ME 368)

d.Leadership is a course that teaches the coaching and leadership skills needed to drive good design process in groups. d.leaders will work on real projects driving design projects within organizations and gain real world skills as they experiment with their leadership style. Take this course if you are inspired by past design classes and want skills to lead design projects beyond Stanford. Preference given to students who have taken other Design Group or d.school classes. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OB 381: Conflict Management and Negotiation

Conflict is unavoidable in every organization. The key question is how it will be handled: will it escalate to dysfunctional levels or will it be effectively managed? Hence, a first aim of the course is to develop your ability to analyze conflicts, to look beneath the surface rhetoric of a conflict, to isolate the important underlying interests, and to determine what sort of agreement (if any) is feasible. We'll analyze which negotiation strategies are effective in different conflicts. We'll also examine psychological and structural factors that create conflict and often pose a barrier to its resolution. But understanding how to analyze a conflict is not enough. To manage conflict effectively, you need a broad repertoire of behavioral skills. Developing these is the second aim of the course. To achieve this, negotiation exercises are used in every session. When playing a role in a simulated conflict, you will be free to try out tactics that might feel uncomfortable in a real one. You will get feedback from your classmates about how you come across. In sum, you can use this course to expand your repertoire of skills, to hone your skills, and to become more adept in choosing when to apply each skill.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF
Instructors: Bendor, J. (PI)

OB 512: Creating, Building, and Sustaining Breakthrough Ventures

This course is designed to provide students with a summary of entrepreneurial processes that have successfully created, developed, and sustained breakthrough ventures. By "breakthrough" we mean ventures that have a lasting and positive impact, touching millions of lives. Examples are based on the experiences of Norman Winarsky, formerly President of SRI Ventures, Charles O¿Reilly, and invited speakers who are leading investors and entrepreneurs. They include companies like Siri, Nuance, Intuitive Surgical, Sandisk, Facebook, and others. nnThink of this course as a ¿master class¿. You will work with the professors and invited speakers to create and build your venture concept. We focus on all elements of building a breakthrough company, starting with the source of breakthrough venture ideas, advancing to building a great value proposition and business plan, recruiting a team, finding investors and board members, scaling the company, deciding whether to sell or go IPO, and ending with wha more »
This course is designed to provide students with a summary of entrepreneurial processes that have successfully created, developed, and sustained breakthrough ventures. By "breakthrough" we mean ventures that have a lasting and positive impact, touching millions of lives. Examples are based on the experiences of Norman Winarsky, formerly President of SRI Ventures, Charles O¿Reilly, and invited speakers who are leading investors and entrepreneurs. They include companies like Siri, Nuance, Intuitive Surgical, Sandisk, Facebook, and others. nnThink of this course as a ¿master class¿. You will work with the professors and invited speakers to create and build your venture concept. We focus on all elements of building a breakthrough company, starting with the source of breakthrough venture ideas, advancing to building a great value proposition and business plan, recruiting a team, finding investors and board members, scaling the company, deciding whether to sell or go IPO, and ending with what it takes to build a company that can sustain itself through continuous innovation. At each step, we follow examples of companies we've helped build, and provide lessons of success as well as failure. The course will be highly interactive, and engage students in elements of building their own venture concepts.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail

PHIL 275A: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Coyne, B. (PI)

SOC 220: Interpersonal Relations (SOC 120)

(Graduate students register for 220.) Forming ties, developing norms, status, conformity, deviance, social exchange, power, and coalition formation; important traditions of research have developed from the basic theories of these processes. Emphasis is on understanding basic theories and drawing out their implications for change in a broad range of situations, families, work groups, and friendship groups.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ridgeway, C. (PI)

SOC 356: Strategy and Organizations

Why are some organizations more competitive than others?  This is one of the defining questions of the interdisciplinary research field known as strategic management.  In this seminar, we will survey the field of strategic management as seen through the lens of organization theory, touching on the four main theoretical approaches that have developed there.nnnMost work in strategic management pays little attention to particular theoretical perspectives, and is organized more by the topic - the phenomenon being studied - such as market exit, growth, performance, mergers and acquisitions, innovation, and the like.  I have catalogued the research in strategic management both according to theoretical perspective and topic, and that structure is developed in this course.  Our goal is to help you to identify theoretical perspectives as you try to understand the strategy field.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOMGEN 275: Leading Value Improvement in Health Care Delivery

Successful leaders on the journey to better care delivery methods with lower total spending inevitably face pivotal crises. What confluence of attitude, strategy, and events allows them to prevail? Contexts will include entrepreneurship and early stage investing, spread of higher value care delivery innovations, health care delivery system management, and private and public policy making to reward value. Guest faculty will include nationally recognized leaders and change agents, who will invite students to recommend alternative approaches to managing pivotal challenges. The course is open to any member of the Stanford community aspiring to lead higher value in health care delivery including graduate students, undergraduates, and postdoctoral candidates, as well as medical center residents and clinical fellows. May be repeated for credit
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

SOMGEN 282: The Startup Garage: Design (CHEMENG 482)

(Same as STRAMGT 356) The Startup Garage is an experiential lab course that focuses on the design, testing and launch of a new venture. Multidisciplinary student teams work through an iterative process of understanding user needs, creating a point of view statement, ideating and prototyping new product and services and their business models, and communicating the user need, product, service and business models to end-users, partners, and investors. In the autumn quarter, teams will: identify and validate a compelling user need and develop very preliminary prototypes for a new product or service and business models. Students form teams, conduct field work and iterate on the combination of business model -- product -- market. Teams will present their first prototypes (business model - product - market) at the end of the quarter to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 284: The Startup Garage: Testing and Launch (CHEMENG 484)

This is the second quarter of the two-quarter series. In this quarter, student teams expand the field work they started in the fall quarter. They get out of the building to talk to potential customers, partners, distributors, and investors to test and refine their business model, product/service and market. This quarter the teams will be expected to develop and test a minimally viable product, iterate, and focus on validated lessons on: the market opportunity, user need and behavior, user interactions with the product or service, business unit economics, sale and distribution models, partnerships, value proposition, and funding strategies. Teams will interact with customers, partners, distributors, investors and mentors with the end goal of developing and delivering a funding pitch to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

STRAMGT 308: Entrepreneurship from Diverse Perspectives

This seminar showcases the diversity of entrepreneurs and the range of entrepreneurial paths they pursue. Thirty-five entrepreneurs and venture capitalists, primarily woman and under-represented minorities, will share their personal and professional journeys, and how each embodies the entrepreneurial mindset. Case studies, readings and videos, will complement in-class discussions with the speakers in exploring the entire entrepreneurial process from finding an idea and forming and building a team, to being an inclusive leader, raising money, assembling a board, and overcoming setbacks and challenges. The class teaches the entrepreneurial mindset, and how everyone can be entrepreneurial in their lives. Teams will work on creating an idea for a company during the quarter.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
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