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11 - 20 of 154 results for: all courses

AFRICAAM 150B: 19th-Century America (AMSTUD 150B, HISTORY 150B)

(Same as HISTORY 50B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Campbell, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 152G: Harlem Renaissance and Modernism (AMSTUD 152G, ENGLISH 152G)

Examination of the explosion of African American artistic expression during 1920s and 30s New York known as the Harlem Renaissance. Amiri Baraka once referred to the Renaissance as a kind of "vicious Modernism", as a "BangClash", that impacted and was impacted by political, cultural and aesthetic changes not only in the U.S. but Europe, the Caribbean and Latin America. Focus on the literature, graphic arts, and the music of the era in this global context.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Elam, M. (PI)

AFRICAAM 166: Introduction to African American History - the Modern Freedom Struggle (AMSTUD 166, HISTORY 66, HISTORY 166)

Using the unique documentary resources and publications of Stanford's Martin Luther King Jr. Research and Education Institute, this course will utilize multi-media materials to shed light on the relationship between grassroots activism and King's visionary leadership.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Carson, C. (PI)

AMSTUD 12A: Introduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature (AFRICAAM 43, ENGLISH 12A)

(Formerly English 43/143). In his bold study, What Was African American Literature?, Kenneth Warren defines African American literature as a late nineteenth- to mid-twentieth-century response to the nation's Jim Crow segregated order. But in the aftermath of the Jim Crow era and the Civil Rights movement, can critics still speak, coherently, of "African American literature"? And how does this political conception of African American literary production compare with accounts grounded in black language and culture? Taking up Warren's intervention, this course will explore African American literature from its earliest manifestations in the spirituals and slave narratives to texts composed at the height of desegregation and decolonization struggles at mid-century and beyond.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Rasberry, V. (PI)

AMSTUD 50N: The Literature of Inequality: Have and Have-Nots from the Gilded Age to the Occupy Era

Not since the turn of the last century have Americans experienced such a profound gap between those who have and those who do not, between wealthy and working poor, between defacto upper and lower classes, between those of the status quo and those who slip to the social periphery. We will be examining literary and artistic explorations of social and economic inequity, fiction and art that looks at reversals of fortune as well as the possibilities for social change. Readings include Jacob Riis¿ How the Other Half Lives, W.E.B. Du Bois¿ The Souls of Black Folk, Edith Wharton¿s House of Mirth , James Agee & Walker Evans¿ Let Us Not Forget Famous Men , T.C. Boyle¿s The Tortilla Curtain, Julie Otsuka¿s When the Emperor Was Divine and Occupy Movement art.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AMSTUD 68N: Mark Twain and American Culture (ENGLISH 68N)

Preference to freshmen. Mark Twain defined the rhythms of our prose and the contours of our moral map. He recognized our extravagant promise and stunning failures, our comic foibles and tragic flaws. He is viewed as the most American of American authors--and as one of the most universal. How does his work illuminate his society¿s (and our society¿s) responses to such issues as race, gender, technology, heredity vs. environment, religion, education, art, imperialism, animal welfare, and what it means to be ¿American¿?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Fishkin, S. (PI)

AMSTUD 101: American Fiction into Film: How Hollywood Scripts and Projects Black and White Relations

Movies and the fiction that inspires them; power dynamics behind production including historical events, artistic vision, politics, and racial stereotypes. What images of black and white does Hollywood produce to forge a national identity? How do films promote equality between the races? What is lost or gained in film adaptations of books?nLimited Enrollment, Instructor¿s Consent Required. Class meetings held in Manzanita Multipurpose Room.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AMSTUD 114Q: Visions of the 1960s

Preference to sophomores. Introduction to the ideas, sensibility, and, to a lesser degree, the politics of the American 60s. Topics: the early 60s vision of a beloved community; varieties of racial, generational, and feminist dissent; the meaning of the counterculture; and current interpretive perspectives on the 60s. Film, music, and articles and books.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AMSTUD 116: American Economic History (ECON 116, HISTORY 156)

The American economy from colonial times to the present, illustrating the role of history in economic life. Topics: U.S. economic development in global and comparative context; slavery as an economic system; emergence of American technology and business organization; economics of the Great Depression and the New Deal; post-World War II economic performance and social change; globalization, information technology, and inequality. Prerequisite: 1 or 1A or 1V.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AMSTUD 123G: Mark Twain: A Fresh Look at an Icon and Iconoclast, 100 Years after His Death

The vitality and versatility of a writer who has been called America's Rabelais, Cervantes, Homer, Tolstoy, and Shakespeare. Journalism, travel books, fiction, drama, and sketches by Mark Twain; how Twain engaged such issues as personal and national identity, satire and social justice, imperialism, race and racism, gender, performance, travel, and technology. What are Twain's legacies in 2010, the centennial of his death, the 175th anniversary of his birth, and the 125th anniversary of his most celebrated novel? Guests include actor Hal Holbrook.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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