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1 - 10 of 14 results for: SLAVIC ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

SLAVIC 118N: Other People's Words: Folklore and Literature

What happens when you collect and use other people's words? This class considers folklore and literature based on it, focusing on the theme of objects that come to life and threaten their makers or owners (including Russian fairy tales and Nikolai Gogol's stories, the Golem legend and Michael Chabon's Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, and Ovid's and Shaw's Pygmalion). We read essays by Jacob Grimm, Sigmund Freud, Roman Jakobson, and others, to understand what folklore can mean and how the oral and the written can interact. Students collect living folklore from a group of their choosing. This course fulfills the second-level Writing and Rhetoric Requirement (Write-2) and emphasizes oral and multimedia presentation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Safran, G. (PI)

SLAVIC 147: Modern Russian Literature and Culture: The Age of War and Revolution (SLAVIC 347)

The Age of Revolution: Readings in Russian Modernist Prose of the 1920-30s: What makes Russian modernist prose special? Or is there anything special about Russian modernist prose? This course aims to answer these questions through close readings of works by Babel, Mandelstam, Zoshchenko, Platonov, Olesha and Bulgakov. Aesthetic issues such as hero, plot, and narrative devices will be addressed with the aid of contemporaneous literary theory (Shklovsky, Tynianov, Eikhenbaum, Bakhtin). Novels and theory will be read in English. (This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to satisfy a Ways requirement.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SLAVIC 165: City Myth: Soviet and Post-Soviet Sites of Memory (SLAVIC 365)

How does memory work in Soviet and post-Soviet space? How do cities create and transform memory? This course uncovers the layers of cultural history in four Russian and Ukrainian cities: Kyiv, Odesa, Moscow, and St. Petersburg. All four cities were imagined as utopian projects and all underwent transformation and destruction in the 20th century; their earlier layers exist only in literary texts and films. Readings combine literary and critical theory (Benjamin,Foucault, Barthes, Lotman) with fiction and films (Akhmatova, Andrukhovych, Babel, Bitov, Bulgakov, Bunin, Paradzhanov, Sokurov, Trifonov, Zhabotinsky, Vertov, Zeldovich) that display the ongoing collective memory work on the Soviet legacy. Students will create cartographic projects with Google Maps, Earth and Tour Builder, and HyperCities that visualize the urban palimpsest of cities undergoing major transformations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ilchuk, Y. (PI)

SLAVIC 179: Literature from Medieval Rus' and Early Modern Russia (SLAVIC 379)

This course offers a survey of the culture of the East Slavs from the 9th to the 17th centuries. The emphasis will be on written literature, visual arts, and religion. Most of the texts that the East Slavs had produced during the time period were influenced and borrowed from Byzantium therefore we will examine the regional variations in the adopted culture of early Rus', as well as its response to Mongol Rule, the impact on culture of political consolidation around Moscow beginning in the 15th century, and the responses to "Westernization" in the 15th-17th centuries. We will pay special attention to stylistics, poetics, and language transformation through the reading of the texts in the original Old Rus¿ian language. Knowledge of Old-Church Slavonic is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ilchuk, Y. (PI)

SLAVIC 184: Word & Image: From the Soviet Avant-Garde to the Late Soviet Post-Modernism (SLAVIC 384)

The course investigates the interaction and tension between visual and textual components present in the early Soviet avant-garde and the late Soviet postmodernism. It explores a broad range of materials: futurist books (Mayakovsky-Rodchenko; Khlebnikov, Kruchenykh), photo-montage experiments of the 1930s, Ilya Kabakov's art, Andrei Monastyrsky's performances, Vladimir Sorokin's experimental novels and Dmitrii Prigov media projects. Taught in English. (This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units to satisfy a Ways requirement.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Skakov, N. (PI)

SLAVIC 199: Individual Work for Undergraduates

Open to Russian majors or students working on special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SLAVIC 260: History and Politics of Russian Language (REES 260)

How did standard Russian develop? Who determines how the language is spoken and written? How does Russian interact with other languages of the region (such as Ukrainian and Yiddish)? This class examines the development of the standard literary Russian language, focusing on the 19th century, the Soviet period, and post-Soviet language politics. Taught in English, reading in Russian.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Safran, G. (PI)

SLAVIC 347: Modern Russian Literature and Culture: The Age of War and Revolution (SLAVIC 147)

The Age of Revolution: Readings in Russian Modernist Prose of the 1920-30s: What makes Russian modernist prose special? Or is there anything special about Russian modernist prose? This course aims to answer these questions through close readings of works by Babel, Mandelstam, Zoshchenko, Platonov, Olesha and Bulgakov. Aesthetic issues such as hero, plot, and narrative devices will be addressed with the aid of contemporaneous literary theory (Shklovsky, Tynianov, Eikhenbaum, Bakhtin). Novels and theory will be read in English. (This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to satisfy a Ways requirement.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SLAVIC 365: City Myth: Soviet and Post-Soviet Sites of Memory (SLAVIC 165)

How does memory work in Soviet and post-Soviet space? How do cities create and transform memory? This course uncovers the layers of cultural history in four Russian and Ukrainian cities: Kyiv, Odesa, Moscow, and St. Petersburg. All four cities were imagined as utopian projects and all underwent transformation and destruction in the 20th century; their earlier layers exist only in literary texts and films. Readings combine literary and critical theory (Benjamin,Foucault, Barthes, Lotman) with fiction and films (Akhmatova, Andrukhovych, Babel, Bitov, Bulgakov, Bunin, Paradzhanov, Sokurov, Trifonov, Zhabotinsky, Vertov, Zeldovich) that display the ongoing collective memory work on the Soviet legacy. Students will create cartographic projects with Google Maps, Earth and Tour Builder, and HyperCities that visualize the urban palimpsest of cities undergoing major transformations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ilchuk, Y. (PI)
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