2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 56 results for: PSYCH

PSYCH 1: Introduction to Psychology

An introduction to the science of how people think, feel, and behave. We will explore such topics as intelligence, perception, memory, happiness, personality, culture, social influence, development, emotion, and mental illness. Students will learn about classic and cutting edge research, a range of methods, and discover how psychology informs our understanding of what it means to be human, addresses other fields, and offers solutions to important social problems.nnAn alternative version of the course, PSYCH 1L, is also offered for reduced (3) units, but does not count for major/minor requirements for Psychology or other disciplines. For more information on PSYCH 1 and PSYCH 1L, visit http://psychone.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 1L: Introduction to Psychology

A reduced-unit version of Stanford's popular Psych 1 class. An introduction to the science of how people think, feel, and behave. We will explore such topics as intelligence, perception, memory, happiness, personality, culture, social influence, development, emotion, and mental illness. Students will learn about classic and cutting edge research, a range of methods, and discover how psychology informs our understanding of what it means to be human, addresses other fields, and offers solutions to important social problems. nThe primary version of the course, PSYCH 1, is offered for 5 units and counts for major/minor requirements for Psychology and other disciplines. For more information on PSYCH 1 and PSYCH 1L, visit http://psychone.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 10: Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (STATS 60, STATS 160)

Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 45: Introduction to Learning and Memory

The literature on learning and memory including cognitive and neural organization of memory, mechanisms of remembering and forgetting, and why people sometimes falsely remember events that never happened. Cognitive theory and behavioral evidence integrated with data from patient studies and functional brain imaging. Required prerequisite: PSYCH 1.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 70: Self and Society: Introduction to Social Psychology (SOC 2)

Why do people behave the way they do? This is the fundamental question that drives social psychology. Through reading, lecture, and interactive discussion, students have the opportunity to explore and think critically about a variety of exciting issues including: what causes us to like, love, help, or hurt others; the effects of social influence and persuasion on individual thoughts, emotion, and behavior; and how the lessons of social psychology can be applied in contexts such as health, work, and relationships. The social forces studied in the class shape our behavior, though their operation cannot be seen directly. A central idea of this class is that awareness of these forces allows us to make choices in light of them, offering us more agency and wisdom in our everyday lives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 95: Introduction to Abnormal Psychology

Theories of and approaches to understanding the phenomenology, etiology, and treatment of psychological disorders among adults and children. Research findings and diagnostic issues. Recommended: PSYCH 1.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 103: Intergroup Communication (CSRE 103)

In an increasingly globalized world, our ability to connect and engage with new audiences is directly correlated with our competence and success in any field How do our intergroup perceptions and reactions influence our skills as communicators? This course uses experiential activities and discussion sections to explore the role of social identity in effective communication.nnThe objective of the course is to examine and challenge our explicit and implicit assumptions about various groups to enhance our ability to successfully communicate across the complex web of identity.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 103F: Intergroup Communication Facilitation (CSRE 103F)

This is a TA training course for Psych 103 - Intergroup Communication
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYCH 121: Ion Transport and Intracellular Messengers (PSYCH 228)

(Graduate students register for 228.) Ion channels, carriers, ion pumps, and their regulation by intracellular messengers in a variety of cell types. Recommended: 120, introductory course in biology or human biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wine, J. (PI)

PSYCH 123F: Navigating a Multicultural World: Practical recommendations for individuals, groups, & institutions (CSRE 123F)

The world is becoming increasing multicultural, as groups of different races, ethnicities, ages, genders, and socioeconomic classes are coming into closer and more frequent contact than ever before. With increased cultural contact comes the need to create spaces that are inclusive and culturally sensitive. In addition, individuals must learn to live, work, and communicate in a multicultural world. How can we leverage research from cultural psychology to promote the best possible individual, interpersonal, and institutional outcomes for all groups?nThis course will serve as an introduction on how to create multicultural worlds and individuals.nDrawing heavily on research, this course begins with a review of what culture is and how itninfluences individual thoughts, emotions, and behaviors. We then discuss multiculturalism (e.g.,nwhat is it, what are some costs and benefits) before addressing how to promote optimalnfunctioning in multicultural settings.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints