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1 - 10 of 68 results for: PHIL ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PHIL 1: Introduction to Philosophy

Is there one truth or many? Does science tell us everything there is to know? Can our minds be purely physical? Do we have free will? Is faith rational? Should we always be rational? What is the meaning of life? Are there moral truths? What are truth, reality, rationality, and knowledge? How can such questions be answered? Intensive introduction to theories and techniques in philosophy from various contemporary traditions. Students must enroll in lecture AND and one of the discussion sections listed.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 13: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Modern (DLCL 13, FRENCH 13)

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? This third and final quarter focuses on the modern period, from the rise of revolutionary ideas to the experiences of totalitarianism and decolonization in the twentieth century. Authors include Locke, Mary Shelley, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Primo Levi, and Frantz Fanon.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 21N: Ethics of Sports (ETHICSOC 21N)

This seminar will be focused on the ethical challenges that are encountered in sport. We will focus on the moral and political issues that affect the world of sport and which athletes, coaches, sports commentators and fans are faced with. For instance, we will ask questions such as: what is a fair game (the ethics of effort, merit, success)? Is it ethical to train people to use violence (the ethics of martial arts)? Are divisions by gender categories justified and what should we think of gender testing? Is the use of animals in sport ever justified? Which forms of performance enhancements are acceptable in sport (the ethics of drug use and enhancements through technologies)? Should we ban sports that damage the players¿ health? Does society owe social support to people who hurt themselves while practicing extreme sports? nnThe class will be structured around small group discussions and exercises as well as brief lectures to introduce key moral and political concepts (such as fairness, more »
This seminar will be focused on the ethical challenges that are encountered in sport. We will focus on the moral and political issues that affect the world of sport and which athletes, coaches, sports commentators and fans are faced with. For instance, we will ask questions such as: what is a fair game (the ethics of effort, merit, success)? Is it ethical to train people to use violence (the ethics of martial arts)? Are divisions by gender categories justified and what should we think of gender testing? Is the use of animals in sport ever justified? Which forms of performance enhancements are acceptable in sport (the ethics of drug use and enhancements through technologies)? Should we ban sports that damage the players¿ health? Does society owe social support to people who hurt themselves while practicing extreme sports? nnThe class will be structured around small group discussions and exercises as well as brief lectures to introduce key moral and political concepts (such as fairness, equality, freedom, justice, exploitation, etc.). I will also bring guests speakers who are involved in a sport activity at Stanford or who have worked on sports as part of their academic careers. By the end of the seminar, students will have a good understanding of the various ethical challenges that surround the world of sport. They will be able to critically discuss sport activities, norms, modes of assessments and policies (on campus and beyond). They will also be prepared to apply the critical ethical thinking that they will have deployed onto other topics than sports. They will have been introduced to the normative approach to social issues, which consists in asking how things should be rather than describing how things are. They will be prepared to take more advanced classes in ethics, political theory, as well as moral and political philosophy.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PHIL 22C: Love in Moral Philosophy

A powerful objection concerning the partiality of love has, for a while now, rankled traditional moral theories that demand impartiality, like utilitarianism and Kantianism. When it comes down to it, all of us would put the interests of our loved ones - family members, close friends, romantic partners - above those of strangers. But love is a central, not a peripheral, part of our moral lives. In response some moral theorists have tried to develop richer views to accommodate the partiality that love demands of us. This tutorial will draw from both contemporary moral theory and from historical treatments to try to find the place of love within moral theory. Recommended background: Phil 2 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Lee, R. (PI)

PHIL 22E: Grad Tutorial: Phenomenology in perception and action

Is perception a passive capacity? Or is perception essentially active in some interesting sense? If the ability to perceive is partly the ability to do something, what is this ability? What might we learn about our relation to the world by studying this ability? Philosophical accounts of perception and action are two places in which the phenomenological tradition has provided exciting perspectives and useful criticism of orthodox accounts. In this tutorial, we will consider perception and action through some phenomenological lenses. Regarding perception, we will consider Merleau-Ponty's view on which the ability to move through our environment structures our perception as significantly as does our retina's sensitivity to light. This tutorial will be valuable to students seeking stimulating perspectives on the nature of thought and action, as well as to students who are curious about Continental philosophy and how its achievements can be of use in contemporary analytic philosophy and in cognitive science. Embodied cognition, the contemporary research program in cognitive science, has significant roots in phenomenology, and this tutorial will be useful to students seeking additional understanding of embodied cognition as a research program.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Turman, J. (PI)

PHIL 36: DANGEROUS IDEAS (ARTHIST 36, EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, HISTORY 3D, MUSIC 36H)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as equality, progress, and tradition have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like freedom of the press, fact versus fiction, and citizenship play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these dangerous ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Satz, D. (PI)

PHIL 72: Contemporary Moral Problems (ETHICSOC 185M, POLISCI 134P)

This course considers some of the moral problems encountered on campus and elsewhere in our lives as citizens and individuals. We will begin with questions that pertain to our own classroom and gradually broaden our scope to include, eventually, questions about terrorism and torture. The primary aims of the course are to encourage students to recognize and address moral questions as they appear in the concrete messiness of life and to help students develop the skills necessary to do this. Questions to be considered include: What would make this a good class and is this very question a moral one? What is education and who is entitled to it? What is the value of equality on campus and beyond? What is institutional discrimination? Are Stanford athletes being exploited? What should count as sexual harassment and is it properly captured by Stanford sexual harassment policies? Should abortions be offered by the Stanford Division of Family Planning? Is it permissible to kill animals for the purpose of scientific experimentation? Should Stanford divest from coal companies? Ought the City of San Francisco allow the homeless to reside in its streets? Who has the standing to condemn acts of terror and how do such acts compare to torture?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PHIL 75: Philosophy of Public Policy

This course aims to train students in the normative analysis of public policies. It offers a critical examination of diverse policy proposals from the perspective of moral and political philosophy. From healthcare to parliamentary reforms to educational policies, social and public policies are underpinned by normative justifications ¿ that is by different conceptions of what justice and fairness require. By analyzing these assumptions and justifications, we can in turn discuss and challenge the rightness of policy X or Y. Drawing on theories such as political liberalism, republicanism and feminist theory we will ask question such as: is workfare ever justified? What is wrong with racial profiling? When (if ever) is compulsory voting justified? Should children have the right to vote? Does affirmative action promote equality? Should freedom of expression ever be restricted? What are the duties of citizens of affluent countries toward asylum seekers and economic migrants? Do we have a rig more »
This course aims to train students in the normative analysis of public policies. It offers a critical examination of diverse policy proposals from the perspective of moral and political philosophy. From healthcare to parliamentary reforms to educational policies, social and public policies are underpinned by normative justifications ¿ that is by different conceptions of what justice and fairness require. By analyzing these assumptions and justifications, we can in turn discuss and challenge the rightness of policy X or Y. Drawing on theories such as political liberalism, republicanism and feminist theory we will ask question such as: is workfare ever justified? What is wrong with racial profiling? When (if ever) is compulsory voting justified? Should children have the right to vote? Does affirmative action promote equality? Should freedom of expression ever be restricted? What are the duties of citizens of affluent countries toward asylum seekers and economic migrants? Do we have a right to privacy? Etc. We will work on a number of theories, texts and examples to make sense of the process of normative evaluation of public policy. By the end of the seminar, students will be prepared to take more advanced classes in ethics, political theory, as well as moral and political philosophy. They will have developed competences in the normative analysis of public policy and they will be able to deploy those competences to assess a broad range of other policies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 80: Mind, Matter, and Meaning

Intensive study of central topics in metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of language and mind in preparation for advanced courses in philosophy. Emphasis on development of analytical writing skills. Prerequisite: one prior course in Philosophy or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PHIL 97SI: Homeless Services in Silicon Valley

Through hands-on, meaningful projects with local service providers, students will engage with the issue of homelessness in the Bay Area. Students will partner with service providers to create a final deliverable while learning from a diverse set of guest speakers, including formerly unhoused individuals. As Stanford¿s only course dedicated to homelessness this academic year, it provides students with a unique opportunity to engage with a pressing issue in their neighborhood.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Wasow, T. (PI)
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