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1 - 10 of 133 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HISTORY 1C: Global History: The Modern Age

This course explores the heterogeneous forces that have shaped our modern world. Analyzing a variety of documents and sources, including memoirs, novels, and films, we will investigate how key political ideas have transformed societies, cultures, and economies across the globe from the late eighteenth century through to the present.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Crews, R. (PI)

HISTORY 3: The Historical and Geographical Background of Current Global Events

This one-unit lecture course aims to provide the historical and geographical context necessary for understanding the most important global issues of the day. Weekly lectures will explore two or more major issues in some detail, illustrating them with maps, timelines, photographs, and other images. Topics are not planned in advance, but will instead reflect stories currently in the news.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 3B: Trans History: The Long View (FEMGEN 3B)

This mini-course explores the history of gender crossing and transgressions, broadly defined. A series of Stanford faculty and one visitor will present historical interpretations of who, why, and how individuals have crossed gender boundaries, as well as how different societies have reacted to gender crossing. The topics range across time from medieval to modern times and across geographic regions from Europe, China, and Iran to the Americas. Short reading assignments will be made available for each class meeting; students must attend all five sessions, complete the readings, and write a summary paper to receive one unit of credit for the series.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 3D: DANGEROUS IDEAS (ARTHIST 36, EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, MUSIC 36H, PHIL 36)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as equality, progress, and tradition have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like freedom of the press, fact versus fiction, and citizenship play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these dangerous ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Satz, D. (PI)

HISTORY 3E: Michelle Obama in American Culture (AFRICAAM 3E, AMSTUD 3E, CSRE 3E, FEMGEN 3E)

Never before has the United States had a First Lady like Michelle Obama. During her eight years in the White House, Michelle Obama transformed traditional meanings of womanhood, marriage, motherhood, and style and created new possibilities for what it means to be strong and what it means to be beautiful. No First Lady has ever been so scrutinized but also so beloved: from her J. Crew dresses to her Let's Move campaign, from her vegetable gardens to her chiseled arms, and from her powerful speeches to her casual and always authentic personality. This class examines the impact on American culture of the most popular First Lady in American history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 5A: History of Information: From Moveable Type to Machine Learning (HISTORY 105A)

Students who have taken HISTORY 205A/305A should not enroll in this course. Information has a history-- and it's not the one we've been told by Silicon Valley. In a series of propulsive, empirically rich, and provocative lectures and discussions, this course deep-dives into the history of information and IT, including moveable type, telegraphy, typewriting, personal computing, gaming, social media, algorithms, machine learning, Digital Humanities, and more. You will leave the course with entirely new perspectives on information, including how IT shapes-- and is shaped by-- culture, nationality, gender, ethnicity, economy, and environment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 7W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking Part II (FEMGEN 7W)

Prerequisite: HISTORY6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Continuation of HISTORY 6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Students will continue working on their projects with their community partners. Several class meetings and small group consultations throughout the quarter. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 9N: How to Start Your Own Country: Sovereignty and State-Formation in Modern History

What does it mean to start a country, or to acquire and possess sovereignty over a territory? This course will examine the historical evolution of fundamental concepts in our international system: state formation, statehood, and sovereignty. Each week will spotlight a case-study in which sovereignty and statehood have appeared greatly confused and hotly contested. These include: the UK-China lease for control of Hong Kong; the US Naval Station in Guantanamo Bay; the corporate state of the legendary British East India Company; and Disney World.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Press, S. (PI)

HISTORY 10B: Survey of Early Modern Europe

(Same as HISTORY 110B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 110B.) Few historical settings offer a more illuminating perspective on our world today than old-regime Europe. Few cast a darker shadow. Science and the enlightened ambition to master nature and society, the emergence of statehood and its grasp for human mobility, bloodshed and coexistence in the face of religious fragmentation, as well as capitalism and the birth of modern finance: this course surveys some of the most consequential developments in European societies between the late fifteenth and the early nineteenth century.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Scholz, L. (PI)

HISTORY 10C: The Problem of Modern Europe

(Same as HISTORY 110C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 110C.) From the late 18th century to the present. How Europeans responded to rapid social changes caused by political upheaval, industrialization, and modernization. How the experience and legacy of imperialism and colonialism both influenced European society and put in motion a process of globalization that continues to shape international politics today.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Daughton, J. (PI)
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